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-   -   tranny flush (http://www.ramforumz.com/showthread.php?t=142069)

02 Ram 05-12-2013 05:24 PM

tranny flush
 
i wanna do a flush since i dont know what the PO did before i bought the truck. fluid is a brown color. dont think it smells burnt yet. i know dropping the pan wont get it all out. should i drop the pan or have a flush done? ive read its not a good idea to do flushes, why i dont know. one said due to not knowing what fluids will mix when a shop does the flush. any help would be greatly appreciated. TAI

GTyankee 05-12-2013 05:47 PM

I talked to a local transmission guy about transmissions
he said that a particle of dirt can get caught in the valve body
He also suggested that GM vehicles should have a fluid changes quite often

I went with a complete flush & changed BOTH transmission filters at 44,000 miles on my Ram & i went with Royal Purple fluid, because i don't think i will be doing it again

Many people drop the transmission pan, pull out the valve body & clean & inspect it, change out the 2 filters & put everything back together & refill with new fluid
this process only leaves 5 quarts of the older fluid in the torque converter & the lines that go to the trans cooler & it mixes with the new fluid when you drive it

02 Ram 05-12-2013 06:07 PM

so will that be OK to do if 5 quarts are left? thanks for the help BTW

GTyankee 05-12-2013 07:51 PM

I can only say that i have not heard anything bad about doing it that way
just use the MOPAR compatible transmission fluid

I wouldn't put Royal Purple, AMSOIL, or another costly brand while doing it that way

you can watch this crazy guy do some of it

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gWO_DCjd0ck

Hermes1 05-12-2013 09:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GTyankee (Post 1096411)
I can only say that i have not heard anything bad about doing it that way
just use the MOPAR compatible transmission fluid

I wouldn't put Royal Purple, AMSOIL, or another costly brand while doing it that way

you can watch this crazy guy do some of it

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gWO_DCjd0ck

Or if you do not mind the added expense, you could just drop the pan to drain the fluid, put the pan back on add the fluid of your choice. Then drive it a bit, drop the pan, change the filters etc. and then add more of the fluid of choice. Then you should have all clean fresh fluid.

TransEngineer 05-13-2013 08:45 AM

When changing your fluid and filters, any fluid that is labeled as MEETING the ATF+4 spec will work fine. Do not use fluids that are marketed as "replacement for" or "compatible with" ATF+4 (etc.). Some dealers stock Mopar ATF+4 in bulk (55 gallon drums). Last time I checked, this bulk fluid (sold by the quart) cost $5.15 list per quart. So you could check with your dealer and see if you can bring your own jug and buy some that way. The part number (for one quart of bulk fluid) is 68055894AA. Or see if you can find it cheaper at your local parts store, Wal-Mart, etc.

Changing the fluid and filters should not cause a trans to get screwed up, UNLESS one of the filters (usually, the main sump filter) is installed incorrectly. The main sump filter has a snout that plugs into a bore in the pump housing. There is a seal at this connection (which is pressed into the pump bore). If the old seal is OK (no cuts or nicks, and won't easily pop out) then leave it in and re-use it. If you replace the seal, the new seal MUST be installed into the pump bore, and tapped in flush against the casting all the way around (not cocked). Do NOT put the seal on the filter snout!! The other filter (the spin-on one) goes on like a conventional engine oil filter. Spin it in until the gasket contacts the case face, then turn it another 1/2 turn or so BY HAND until it's snug. Do NOT overtorque it, since the threaded snout on this filter is plastic and will crack if you crank it down too tight.

You can actually "flush" your own trans if you want. Here is how to do it with an RFE-series trans (545RFE / 65RFE / 66RFE / 68RFE): First, do a fluid drain and refill (and filter change) by dropping the oil pan. Then, you need to get the old oil out of the converter. When running in Park (or Neutral), oil from the converter is sent to the cooler. So you can disconnect one of the cooler lines and then pump out the converter by idling it in Park. But you don't want to run the trans dry. You also need to PLUG the other side of the cooler line (the return side) because otherwise the pump will suck air through that line. Note that the UPPER line at the trans is "to cooler" and the lower line is the return line.

On an RFE trans, you can typically run it down about 1 gallon low before the pump starts sucking air. So overfill it by 1 quart, and then do the pump-out-the-cooler-line routine until you've drained 4 quarts. That should leave you 3 quarts low. Refill and repeat.

The diesel (68RFE) converter holds just a hair under 2 gallons. Gas engine converters hold less than that. So draining two gallons out the cooler line should flush out the converter pretty well.

Hermes1 05-13-2013 11:57 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TransEngineer (Post 1096793)
When changing your fluid and filters, any fluid that is labeled as MEETING the ATF+4 spec will work fine. Do not use fluids that are marketed as "replacement for" or "compatible with" ATF+4 (etc.). Some dealers stock Mopar ATF+4 in bulk (55 gallon drums). Last time I checked, this bulk fluid (sold by the quart) cost $5.15 list per quart. So you could check with your dealer and see if you can bring your own jug and buy some that way. The part number (for one quart of bulk fluid) is 68055894AA. Or see if you can find it cheaper at your local parts store, Wal-Mart, etc.

Changing the fluid and filters should not cause a trans to get screwed up, UNLESS one of the filters (usually, the main sump filter) is installed incorrectly. The main sump filter has a snout that plugs into a bore in the pump housing. There is a seal at this connection (which is pressed into the pump bore). If the old seal is OK (no cuts or nicks, and won't easily pop out) then leave it in and re-use it. If you replace the seal, the new seal MUST be installed into the pump bore, and tapped in flush against the casting all the way around (not cocked). Do NOT put the seal on the filter snout!! The other filter (the spin-on one) goes on like a conventional engine oil filter. Spin it in until the gasket contacts the case face, then turn it another 1/2 turn or so BY HAND until it's snug. Do NOT overtorque it, since the threaded snout on this filter is plastic and will crack if you crank it down too tight.

You can actually "flush" your own trans if you want. Here is how to do it with an RFE-series trans (545RFE / 65RFE / 66RFE / 68RFE): First, do a fluid drain and refill (and filter change) by dropping the oil pan. Then, you need to get the old oil out of the converter. When running in Park (or Neutral), oil from the converter is sent to the cooler. So you can disconnect one of the cooler lines and then pump out the converter by idling it in Park. But you don't want to run the trans dry. You also need to PLUG the other side of the cooler line (the return side) because otherwise the pump will suck air through that line. Note that the UPPER line at the trans is "to cooler" and the lower line is the return line.

On an RFE trans, you can typically run it down about 1 gallon low before the pump starts sucking air. So overfill it by 1 quart, and then do the pump-out-the-cooler-line routine until you've drained 4 quarts. That should leave you 3 quarts low. Refill and repeat.

The diesel (68RFE) converter holds just a hair under 2 gallons. Gas engine converters hold less than that. So draining two gallons out the cooler line should flush out the converter pretty well.

Interesting post and sounds like a good option for the do-it-yourselfer.

02 Ram 05-13-2013 01:58 PM

thanks guys!! TransEngineer, exactly what i was looking for, thanks!!

TransEngineer 05-13-2013 02:17 PM

I should also point out that if you start the engine (and run it, to set the oil level after doing the pan drain and refill), you will be blowing all the old oil (from the converter) into the sump.

So DON'T start the engine until you've got the cooler line disconnected (or ready to disconnect). Then, ALL the old oil from the converter will end up in your bucket (or, if you're like me, probably on the driveway!) instead of mixed into the pan. It normally takes about 7 quarts to refill an RFE trans after a pan drop, so I would throw in 8 quarts and then start it up and pump a gallon out the cooler line. Then shut it off, add another gallon of fresh oil, and pump out another gallon. Then shut it off, reconnect the cooler line, add 2-3 quarts, then start it up again and set the final level.

snrusnak 05-13-2013 02:50 PM

Quote:

Then, ALL the old oil from the converter will end up in your bucket (or, if you're like me, probably on the driveway!)
LOL

And they say engineer's don't have a sense of humor... :LOL:


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