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Old 02-19-2014, 01:51 PM
wolfman01 wolfman01 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BowHunter11 View Post
I don't have access to something like an OBD computer, although that would be nice. On the other hand, my dad has a volt meter he uses for working on pumps for people's houses. I don't know much at all about mechanics or electrical issues, so what/how do you mean looking at values the hard way?
What you need to get are the voltage ranges that the sensors operate in. You want to look for voltages that are outside the operational range of the sensor, most likely reading zero. When the car is running right, all of the sensors should be showing their voltages in their proper range. The one that doesn't show the proper voltage range (may toggle if it cycles), or shows wild numbers will be the one that is causing your issue. As others have mentioned, even though your TPS has been replaced, I would still suspect that circuit, or mass airflow sensor and its circuit. The car is apparently having issues knowing how much fuel to inject, causing your screwy idle. The time span you are discussing is proper for when the car changes from "open loop" (no sensors to dictate air/fuel mixtures) to "closed loop" (sensors determine quantity and duration of injection).

This is why electrical issues get expensive fast. They are a bitch to troubleshoot.

I would also clean that throttle body to make sure that being carboned up isn't the cause of your issue.
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