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Old 01-13-2010, 07:21 PM
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Post Throttle Body Cleaning Procedure

The best way to clean a throttle body is to remove it from the manifold. While the one in the following photos is from a 4.0L, most without electronic throttle control are similar. Basic hand tools, a T20 torx bit, throttle body or carb cleaner, old toothbrush, scotchbrite pad (optional) and possibly a new gasket for the throttle body are all you need. Most of the time the gaskets will come off cleanly and can be reused but it's a good idea to at least make sure you can get one if needed before starting. Bear in mind this procedure is for non-ETC applications ONLY. ETC applications won't have the IAC motor and the use of carb or throttle body cleaners can harm the electronics on an ETC throttle body. Chrysler recommends the use of brake parts cleaner for the ETC assembly.




A typical Dirty throttle body after removal from the intake. (bottom view)



Remove the IAC motor with a T20 Torx bit. Be careful not to lose the rubber o-ring. Soak the pintle with Carb or throttle body cleaner and scrub with a toothbrush or scotchbrite pad until the carbon is removed, spray again to rinse, and allow to dry.




Your IAC should look something like this when finished.





Next, spray cleaner into the IAC passages and allow to soak and then use the toothbrush to scrub the passages until clean. You may need to scrub and rinse a few times.



I put the throttle body in a vise to make cleaning and photographing easier. If you use a vise, be careful not to clamp any sensors. Again, soak the buildup and scrub with a toothbrush or scotchbrite pad until clean. You'll likely need to work on it from both ends. Once finished, rinse thoroughly and rinse the IAC passages again if needed.




This is what the bore should look like when finished and ready for reassembly and installation. Just install the IAC (again, make sure the o-ring is in place), bolt the throttle body back on, reconnect the sensors and cables and fire it up.
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