Thread: Knock Sensor?
View Single Post
  #3  
Old 11-10-2010, 03:26 PM
RamTech's Avatar
RamTech RamTech is offline
Dodge Ram Forum Senior Member!

 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Johnson City, TN
Age: 44
Posts: 12,120
Gender: Male
Vehicle: 2004 Dakota Club Cab 4X4
Trim Level: SXT
Color: Bright Silver
Engine: 2002-2008 226ci (3.7L) Magnum/PowerTech V6 215hp 235lb/ft
Rep Power: 14
Rep:1824
RamTech has a brilliant futureRamTech has a brilliant futureRamTech has a brilliant futureRamTech has a brilliant futureRamTech has a brilliant futureRamTech has a brilliant futureRamTech has a brilliant futureRamTech has a brilliant futureRamTech has a brilliant futureRamTech has a brilliant futureRamTech has a brilliant future
Default

I can't help with the data logging but here is a description of the knock sensor operation.

When the knock sensor detects a knock in one of the cylinders on the corresponding bank, it sends an input signal to the Powertrain Control Module (PCM). In response, the PCM retards ignition timing for all cylinders by a scheduled amount.
Knock sensors contain a piezoelectric chrystal which constantly vibrates and sends an input voltage (signal) to the PCM while the engine operates. As the intensity of the crystal's vibration increases, the knock sensor output voltage also increases.
The voltage signal produced by the knock sensor increases with the amplitude of vibration. The PCM receives the knock sensor voltage signal as an input. If the signal rises above a predetermined level, the PCM will store that value in memory and retard ignition timing to reduce engine knock. If the knock sensor voltage exceeds a preset value, the PCM retards ignition timing for all cylinders. It is not a selective cylinder retard.
The PCM ignores knock sensor input during engine idle conditions. Once the engine speed exceeds a specified value, knock retard is allowed.
Knock retard uses its own short term and long term memory program.
Long term memory stores previous detonation information in its battery-backed RAM. The maximum authority that long term memory has over timing retard can be calibrated.
Short term memory is allowed to retard timing up to a preset amount under all operating conditions (as long as rpm is above the minimum rpm) except at Wide Open Throttle (WOT). The PCM, using short term memory, can respond quickly to retard timing when engine knock is detected. Short term memory is lost any time the ignition key is turned off.
Reply With Quote