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Old 08-08-2011, 10:36 PM
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Studdlygoof Studdlygoof is offline
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After letting the last two layers of fiberglass dry, the entire piece was rigid enough to remove from the truck. There is a total of 5 layers of glass right now with nylon rope in the middle. After I get all the MDF sides done my plan is to come back and add a couple more layers to the specific "box area" to make it even sturdier.



Now that the piece was out I needed to trim it up a bit so that I could get some better measurements for my MDF sidewalls. I see alot of people use jigsaws when cutting their fiberglass boxes. With all the contours on my piece i was worried I wouldn't get a good clean cut with all the vibrations. After a quick trip to Home Depot I found a cutting blade for my Dremel that was made for fiberglass. Other then the massive amounts of dust, this blade worked 10 times better then I wanted it to. I was able to get nice clean fine tuned cuts in a rather quick time.



With the bottom all trimmed up I was able to finish the final details with the actual enclosures for the woofers. I'm going with two Crossfire DB3 12" Subwoofers. I lost the paperwork for them somewhere in a move and couldn't find any of the specifications for the cubic air space required for each sub to work properly. I ended up calling the technical support technician at Crossfire and he told me that they require optimally 1 cubic ft of airspace per woofer. I then added another 15% of space ontop of that to make up for the displacement of the woofer itself so I end up with 1.15 cubic/ft per enclosure.
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