View Single Post
  #7  
Old 12-06-2011, 09:47 PM
CdnoilRAM's Avatar
CdnoilRAM CdnoilRAM is offline
I push the skinny pedal


 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Calgary, AB, CA
Age: 30
Posts: 17,047
Gender: Male
Vehicle: 2009 Blown 349 Hemi
Trim Level: Sport - Modified
Color: Brilliant Black/Snake Skin Green
Engine: 2009-2012 345ci (5.7L) Hemi V8 390hp 407lb/ft
Rep Power: 20
Rep:3236
CdnoilRAM has a reputation beyond reputeCdnoilRAM has a reputation beyond reputeCdnoilRAM has a reputation beyond reputeCdnoilRAM has a reputation beyond reputeCdnoilRAM has a reputation beyond reputeCdnoilRAM has a reputation beyond reputeCdnoilRAM has a reputation beyond reputeCdnoilRAM has a reputation beyond reputeCdnoilRAM has a reputation beyond reputeCdnoilRAM has a reputation beyond reputeCdnoilRAM has a reputation beyond repute
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by 2010 ram View Post
I have the Poweraid tbs and didnt really noticed any mpg change or much or a power change.
That's because a throttlebody spacer was intended for use on non-efi engines where you want to increase the cyclonic movement of the air which results in more air/fuel mix time before it enters the cylinders. If you spin the air after the throttlebody, all you're doing is slowing it down fractionally. Look at how our intake runners are positioned, the air gets forces down to the bottom of the manifold, then up and around, through each runner, do you honestly thing that there's any change to the airflow characteristics by helically accelerating the air? If we had a ram-style or a single plane manifold, then absolutely, they'd have a use, but on our keg-style, they are a $100 way to make it sound like you have a small supercharger.
__________________
Sponsored by Bully's Performance
Green Mamba '09 Ram 1500 QCRB 4x4 Sport - dropped, blown, and bottle fed
Kurtis
Reply With Quote