View Single Post
  #2  
Old 01-25-2012, 04:04 PM
CdnoilRAM's Avatar
CdnoilRAM CdnoilRAM is offline
I push the skinny pedal


 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Calgary, AB, CA
Age: 30
Posts: 17,123
Gender: Male
Vehicle: 2009 Blown 349 Hemi
Trim Level: Sport - Modified
Color: Brilliant Black/Snake Skin Green
Engine: 2009-2012 345ci (5.7L) Hemi V8 390hp 407lb/ft
Rep Power: 20
Rep:3269
CdnoilRAM has a reputation beyond reputeCdnoilRAM has a reputation beyond reputeCdnoilRAM has a reputation beyond reputeCdnoilRAM has a reputation beyond reputeCdnoilRAM has a reputation beyond reputeCdnoilRAM has a reputation beyond reputeCdnoilRAM has a reputation beyond reputeCdnoilRAM has a reputation beyond reputeCdnoilRAM has a reputation beyond reputeCdnoilRAM has a reputation beyond reputeCdnoilRAM has a reputation beyond repute
Default

Warm up time is really dependant on temperature with the diesels, it also makes a difference if you have a high-idle function as well since that cuts the warm up time down. Generally you should allow a diesel to warm up in the winter for at least 5 min since the most damage occurs to a diesel when it's cold due to the low oil pressure not lubricating the piston skirt properly. The diesels are a lot harder on the sleeved walls because they run at a much higher chamber pressure and you can start having ring/side wall scoring issues if you don't have the proper lubrication; you can also overheat the top piston ring and crack the top of the piston.

Unless you're running a propane heater under the engine (which we do is extremely cold temperatures!) you can't heat the block too fast on a diesel, but you can definately do damage by putting load on it when it's cold.
__________________
Sponsored by Bully's Performance
Green Mamba '09 Ram 1500 QCRB 4x4 Sport - dropped, blown, and bottle fed
Kurtis
Reply With Quote