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I’m looking at purchasing a travel trailer I’ve got a 14’ 1500 5.7 6sp. 4x4 with 3:55 gears. I have found a sweet deal on a 7500lb# dry weight. Am I being to ambitious in thinking my truck will handle this camper? I will be using a weight distribution hitch and will be purchasing air ride kit
 

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Payload is probably going to be an issue so that's what I'd look at first. Once loaded the trailer will likely be well over 8000lbs with a 1000lb+ tongue weight. You need 10-15% of loaded trailer weight for tongue weight - most travel trailers seem to do better in the 12-15% range. A reasonable rule of thumb to estimate tongue weight is to use 12% of the GVWR of the trailer. If you can post more details about the trailer such as the GVWR and overall length would be helpful for others to provide better feedback.

Look on the drivers door jamb/pillar for the tire loading sticker with the phrase "The combined weight of occupants and cargo should never exceed XXXX lbs" and post that number. That is the amount of payload your specific truck can carry as it left the factory. If you've added aftermarket accessories such as bed cover, side steps, etc. the weight of those items needs to be subtracted from that payload number.

Add together the estimated tongue weight + 100lbs for weight distributing hitch + weight of all passengers and cargo that you would load in the truck and compare that to the payload number from the door jamb. My guess is it will be very close if not over the available payload.
 

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From own experience- I would stay around 6000 - 6500# dry weight- which will be then ~8500# loaded, when you keep it low.
That's what I had and I felt after I bought mine, that I was right at the limit I was comfortable with. If I would had not felt comfortable, I would had probably upgraded to a 2500. I never told this to my wife (it's just one of those things, you better don't tell her, after you found out, that you're in the critical zone, even though you told her man-like: "I've got this, babe") that I'm at the limit this truck can do.
The closer you go to the limit, the more important is the quality of weight distribution hitch- with this weight, I, for example would never settle for one with chains and rather go with a 4-point wdh - either Hensley, equalizer or blue ox- depending on your budget.
Btw- oversizing the wdh is good- but if you go too high, it actually gets worse. For example- if your trailer has 900# tongue weight, a 1200# max wdh is recommended, but a 1500# wdh would be oversized in a way, that the dampening feature would be too stiff, as it's set up for a way heavier trailer and it's sway control features actually can't work, because the hitch also needs a certain minimum weight, as a 4-point uses the weight of the tongue to control the sway.
It's a complicated topic and I don't want to goo too deep into it, as I'm well aware, the deeper I go into the less I know, what I'm talking about- that's why I leave it here and just have to depend on "experts" (as there are many in the internet) and believe, what others found out.
I just can say- I did, what some credible people said and it was not a bad thing to do, after what I experienced.
Overall- even though I never done it so far (call me lazy bastard, as I'm aware, that I'm one of those who tell others what's best to do- because I also know- but never do it by my self, because I'm too lazy and always have better things to do with my money- and I also don't want to go in endless discussions with my wife, who then always put my decisions in question, why I bought this truck in the first place, knowing, that I need to put money in, to be able to do, what I told her it can in the first place- yeah- it's that complicated)- a set of progressive springs is also not a bad investment, regardless what kind of trailer you buy.
good luck with your search.
 

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I posted in your other thread, but here it is:

With an 8600# base rating, that dry weight is too high. I suspect that without very careful packing you will exceed your payload and rear axle rating. If you have a family of 4, forget it, you'll most likely be over your max by a fair margin.

Your terrain will also dictate what a comfortable towing limit is for you, just because something might fall within the limits doesn't mean it's a good idea. My last camper (26' and 4900-# dry) I took over Wolf Creek Pass in Colorado (almost 11,000 ft in elevation with 6.8% grade) and it was quite comfortable with a combined weight of 12,000+ pounds, so the camper was probably 6000-6500# loaded.

My new camper is 5' longer (31' plus)and 900-1000# heavier and nearly maxes my weight ratings in every category (axle, towing, GCWR). The truck tows it well, but I wouldn't put much more camper behind a 1500 as it becomes a lot to keep in check for the WDH and sway control. I would not take this setup over Wolf Creek Pass, even if I had 3.92 gears, it's just too much weight and length for the truck to try and keep in check.

Everyone's towing experience is different. I have over 8,000 miles of towing my trailers on this truck through the US and Quebec, mostly highways.
 

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oh I know that feeling of the camper is too heavy or the towing capacity of the truck, my 98 1500 is only weighted for 6600 pounds and my trailer is a 2017 29' Catalina Coachman tow along weighted 4780 dry weight, max is out at 7000. seems like sometimes my gas truck doesn't have enough pulling power even with a weight distributing tow hitch set up.





 
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