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So, I have been going back and forth, literally losing sleep over this first world problem.

I'm looking at a 2017 Dodge Ram 1500 Laramie Crew Cab 4x4 with the 8 speed 3.21 rear end (payload 1510, max trailer weight 7,990). Our rig is a Keystone Cougar X-Lite 29bhs that comes in at 32.5 total feet long, 6302 dry weight, payload of 1498, which puts POTENTIAL weight at 7800 lbs and tongue weight at 850 lbs before weight distribution hitch. Once hooked to the w/d hitch, tongue weight is probably closer to 550. We never are near that potential weight, as we only camp at parks and fill up when we pull in and dump when we exit. Yup, we are those campers. Normally I would guess we are between 7000-7200 lbs loaded.

Payload wise between me, the wife, the three kids, and dog I am overshooting at 700 lbs. 700 lbs plus the 550 hitch weight (after w/d hitch) puts us at 1250 lbs give or take, and add another 100 lbs for random crap that comes with the 5 of us.

My question now that I have thrown out all those numbers....anyone have a similar setup and how does it tow? We are in Indiana and will mostly stay here in Indiana, no mountains but an occasional hill or two. We might take a trip every couple years to Arkansas and have to go thru the Ozark Mountains, but nothing too crazy.

Thanks for any input that you can give.
 

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So, I have been going back and forth, literally losing sleep over this first world problem.

I'm looking at a 2017 Dodge Ram 1500 Laramie Crew Cab 4x4 with the 8 speed 3.21 rear end (payload 1510, max trailer weight 7,990). Our rig is a Keystone Cougar X-Lite 29bhs that comes in at 32.5 total feet long, 6302 dry weight, payload of 1498, which puts POTENTIAL weight at 7800 lbs and tongue weight at 850 lbs before weight distribution hitch. Once hooked to the w/d hitch, tongue weight is probably closer to 550. We never are near that potential weight, as we only camp at parks and fill up when we pull in and dump when we exit. Yup, we are those campers. Normally I would guess we are between 7000-7200 lbs loaded.

Payload wise between me, the wife, the three kids, and dog I am overshooting at 700 lbs. 700 lbs plus the 550 hitch weight (after w/d hitch) puts us at 1250 lbs give or take, and add another 100 lbs for random crap that comes with the 5 of us.

My question now that I have thrown out all those numbers....anyone have a similar setup and how does it tow? We are in Indiana and will mostly stay here in Indiana, no mountains but an occasional hill or two. We might take a trip every couple years to Arkansas and have to go thru the Ozark Mountains, but nothing too crazy.

Thanks for any input that you can give.

I would recommend finding a truck with a 3.91 gear. I have a 30 footer that weighs about the same with a 16 1500 with the 3.91 gear tows great.
 

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The 3.21 has plenty of power with 8500+ lbs, you should be concerned about payload primarily
 

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Discussion Starter #5
1350 lbs (worst case max payload with extra crap too) out of 1510 lb capacity, would you consider that pushing it?
 

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1350 lbs (worst case max payload with extra crap too) out of 1510 lb capacity, would you consider that pushing it?

Not at all
 

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Thanks, just wanted to make sure I wasn’t missing something. From everything I’ve read I should be good, just wanted some others input on it. I like to error on the side of caution....
 

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Are you sure that is the payload, seems high for a Laramie CC.
My CC Outdoorsman is less than 1300 lb payload and the Laramie tends to be equal or less than the Outdoorsman as far as payload.
 

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So, I have been going back and forth, literally losing sleep over this first world problem.

I'm looking at a 2017 Dodge Ram 1500 Laramie Crew Cab 4x4 with the 8 speed 3.21 rear end (payload 1510, max trailer weight 7,990). Our rig is a Keystone Cougar X-Lite 29bhs that comes in at 32.5 total feet long, 6302 dry weight, payload of 1498, which puts POTENTIAL weight at 7800 lbs and tongue weight at 850 lbs before weight distribution hitch. Once hooked to the w/d hitch, tongue weight is probably closer to 550. We never are near that potential weight, as we only camp at parks and fill up when we pull in and dump when we exit. Yup, we are those campers. Normally I would guess we are between 7000-7200 lbs loaded.




Check the door sticker, but according to the Ram chart neither that payload or trailer weight comes up.


https://www.ramtrucks.com/towing-guide.html
 

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Discussion Starter #11
But I wonder if that chart doesn’t take into account the extra weight the Laramie package could have....
 

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But I wonder if that chart doesn’t take into account the extra weight the Laramie package could have....



Exactly, those are the best case.
The payload is listed on your door jamb or door. Go off of it.


AND even then, the only accurate way is to weigh the actual truck, because if you added side steps, undercoating, toneau cover, normal extras carried in the truck, etc, etc. It all adds up and has to be taken into consideration.


It isn't that the truck can't handle it, but more so, god forbid, something happens and there is a fatality or serious injury and you are overweight. Things can get real ugly legally quickly. Not something you expect, but you just never know.


That is one of the many reasons people go up to a 2500 when towing a decent size trailer.
 

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But I wonder if that chart doesn’t take into account the extra weight the Laramie package could have....
Reading the fine print at the bottom of the page on the Towing Chart document it states that payload and max trailer weights are estimated values. Further down the fine print it details some of the variables that come into play in those estimates. I've not found this particular document all that useful when it comes to a specific truck/trailer combination like you are trying to assess.

As pacofortacos points out for working this specific scenario it's best to use the values of the truck itself. I think that you'll find the actual payload on the Laramie is going to be a bit less than the 1510 off the Towing chart document. Based on the Towing & Payload Capacity page on ramtrucks.com a Laramie trim level in the crew cab/4x4/5.7L Hemi/3.21 axle config has a max payload of 1290 (6.4 bed) or 1330 (5.7 bed). Max towing is 7820 (6.4 bed) or 7860 (5.7 bed). You'll notice as you scroll through that chart how the max payload and towing vary based on trim level. The Laramie Longhorn and the Limited trim levels have the lowest payloads. All those goodies on the higher trim levels amount to reductions in available payload.

Look on the drivers door jamb for the yellow "Tire and Loading Information" sticker and find the phrase "The combined weight of occupants and cargo should not exceed XXXX". This is the available payload for that truck as delivered from the factory. Add up the weight of all passengers/cargo that would be loaded for a trip plus the estimated tongue weight + ~75lbs for the wdh and see if that comes in under the amount of available payload. Loading the truck up as if you were heading out and running it over a CAT scale will give you a much more accurate assessment of how much tongue weight it can handle. Just subtract the truck's loaded scale weight from the GVWR list on the other drivers door sticker.

As for the trailer - is the 6302 dry weight from the brochure or web site? If so those weights generally don't include full propane or options added at the factory, etc. The actual empty weight is going to be higher. Check the yellow sticker on the trailer for actual empty weight as delivered which would include full propane plus any options added at the factory. I think payload on the truck is going to be a problem once fully loaded and ready to roll.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
You guys have truly been awesome! Knowing the little bit that I have learned in the past 48 hours I have come to two conclusions.

1) A good number of people that I see driving on the roads and in the campgrounds have severely underrated vehicles for what they are pulling. I thought I was somewhat intelligent when it came to towing capabilities and have found that I have a lot to learn. I can only imagine what some people who buy a trailer on Monday and truck on Tuesday are running.

2) I’m buying a 2500.

Thanks again everyone!!
 

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Part of the problem is the trucks are easily capable of pulling the load, they have the power.

But the big problem is the legality. It just isn't worth the risk if something happens. Unfortunately, the risk factor often isn't in your hands either.



Also stability can become a factor when you start to get into long heavy loads , the 2500 and 3500 are heavier, have beefier brakes, suspension, the whole works.

There's a guy on here (there is one post where he goes through what he does) that tows professionally.

He can legally tow an impressive load with a 1500 BUT he has everything setup perfectly and weighs the setups often to verify.
It can be done with the correct knowledge.
Though, I don't think he has much weight as far as passengers and cargo :)
 

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There's a guy on here (there is one post where he goes through what he does) that tows professionally.

He can legally tow an impressive load with a 1500 BUT he has everything setup perfectly and weighs the setups often to verify.
It can be done with the correct knowledge.
Though, I don't think he has much weight as far as passengers and cargo :)

You must be referencing Verndiesel. He runs a 1500 Ecodiesel and tows Airstream Trailers from the manufacturer. He also tows boats and other trailers. He is up around 470k miles these days.
 

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Ideally, you're looking at a 2500, but it sounds like you made the decision already to go that route.
3.92 vs 3.21 doesn't change the payload or, which is the most limiting factor on the 1500's. I typically tow within a few hundred pounds of the GCWR with my 1500 and it does it well (31.5' trailer) but I'm sure a 2500 would do it with more stability.

Looking for a 2500, I would look for a truck with a 6.4 and 4.10 gears, which is usually difficult to find.

Good luck in your search!
 

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You guys have truly been awesome! Knowing the little bit that I have learned in the past 48 hours I have come to two conclusions.

1) A good number of people that I see driving on the roads and in the campgrounds have severely underrated vehicles for what they are pulling. I thought I was somewhat intelligent when it came to towing capabilities and have found that I have a lot to learn. I can only imagine what some people who buy a trailer on Monday and truck on Tuesday are running.

2) I’m buying a 2500.

Thanks again everyone!!
With the 2500/6.4L Hemi you can have the nice trim level and not eat into your payload that much so good choice! As 14Hemi points out if you can find one with the 4.10 gears that would be preferable. I'm looking at upgrading to a 2500 soon - waiting to see what the refresh looks like. My dealer says there is supposed to be some details on that coming early spring 2019. Hopefully we see some nice improvements like with the refreshed 1500's.

Good luck with the new truck and enjoy the much improved towing experience.
 

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I'm looking at upgrading to a 2500 soon - waiting to see what the refresh looks like. My dealer says there is supposed to be some details on that coming early spring 2019. Hopefully we see some nice improvements like with the refreshed 1500's.

Good luck with the new truck and enjoy the much improved towing experience.

From what I have seen the Heavy Duty 5th generation trucks will look better than the 5th gen 1500s
 
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