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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Selling my '17 2500 Laramie 2500 6.4 4x4 and buying a 2018 2500. Undecided about the Cummins. And since the Aisin is not available, the 68RFE will have to suffice. Pull a 18' fish and ski boat and maybe a small utility trailer with a smoker/cooker Santa Maria grill. Nothing very large. If I buy another 6.4, I will get 4.10's. Drive about 20 miles back and forth to work from home. Have not heard too many complaints on the 68RFe; just don't need a 3500 house mover. Thoughts?
Thx
 

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You're swapping a '17 2500 for another 2500 one year newer, and can't decide whether to get the diesel?

I don't get it. If you don't get the diesel, what have you gained?

Anyway, you don't need the Cummins to pull an 18 foot ski boat or small trailer and in the 2500 models the extra weight of the Cummins digs a pretty big hole in the truck's payload capability, to the point at which can even be only a little bit more than some 1500 configurations.

Thunderhorse says it over and over, and he's right. If you're towing so heavy that you really do need the extra Cummins' torque, you're almost certainly going to have enough pin/hitch weight to need the 3500 suspension.

The Cummins in a 2500 doesn't make a whole lot of sense in so many ways, but they sure sell a lot of them.

Yeah, it's better mileage, but with more expensive fuel, higher maintenance costs and that $10K (with tax) upcharge for the Cummins, it takes a lot of miles driven to start breaking even.
 

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Thunderhorse says it over and over, and he's right. If you're towing so heavy that you really do need the extra Cummins' torque, you're almost certainly going to have enough pin/hitch weight to need the 3500 suspension.
Dang, I guess just call me "horse" now because 9thousandfeet just stole my thunder :LOL:

ok ok that was cheesy...

OP I do have the same question though: are you getting a different trim, or you just want a new truck to go from 3.73 to 4.10 gears? Because I find it hard to believe you could trade up to a one year newer truck for less than the cost of a diff regear.


If you get the diesel make it a 1 ton
 

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I have to agree. With the kind of weight that you're pulling, you're not going to see much, if any difference, between the 3.73 and the 4.10 rear end. Maybe a slightly better oomph on the really steep grades.


Like others here, I don't see much sense in going from a 2017 to a 2018, especially when you're sticking with the 2500.


Put hey, it's your money. I have a friend who trades in his Challenger every 2 years for the latest model. Too each his own. /shrug
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
2500 vs 3500

The '17 was the first Ram I have ever owned. So I found other options, colors, and trim levels that I would like to have. It is a matter of specifics. I am not looking for judgement, just some owners with experience that have an opinion about my questions. and if a man can afford it...why not
 

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The '17 was the first Ram I have ever owned. So I found other options, colors, and trim levels that I would like to have. It is a matter of specifics. I am not looking for judgement, just some owners with experience that have an opinion about my questions. and if a man can afford it...why not

I hear ya on that. More power to you.

If you want the 4.10 rear end, I will warn ya now....you'll have to order it. I looked everywhere for a 2018 6.4L 3500 with a 4.10 rear end before I ordered mine, and couldn't find one anywhere. Seems to be the same with the 2500, as well, as when I first started looking, it was for a 2500. Had to order the 3500 with the 4.10, so you'll be looking at 8-12 weeks, maybe longer after ordering. Mine took 12 weeks. Just got here last week.

So be aware that you'll have to wait for it if you want the 4.10 rear end. Also be aware that the colors can possibly be quite limited when ordering. At least they were when I ordered it on March 28th of this year.

I will be able to tell you more on the 4.10 rear end in a couple weeks after a horse camping trip where the truck will be hauling a 10'2" camper(2600 lb dry weight) and towing a 3 horse trailer(7-8k fully loaded) over some pretty good high mountain passes here in Oregon.

On my old 2001 Ram 2500 V10, the 4.10 rear end was excellent. But that was with 16" tires and a completely different engine. And I am hauling a lot more weight than you are.
 

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For what you're moving, I don't think the 3.73 are going to be an issue. With that said, as others mentioned, it's very difficult to find trucks with 4.10's on dealer lots.
You may have luck finding the truck equipped as you want it minus having the 4.10 gears and leveraging the dealer to do a gear swap as part of the deal.
 

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The '17 was the first Ram I have ever owned. So I found other options, colors, and trim levels that I would like to have. It is a matter of specifics. I am not looking for judgement, just some owners with experience that have an opinion about my questions. and if a man can afford it...why not
Well if you would have explained about your desire for additional/different colors and options initially, your post would have been easier to comprehend.


You've decided to change trucks from a '17 2500 Laramie to an '18 2500 in a different color and maybe a different trim level and options, and you're looking for input about whether to go with the Cummins or stick with the 6.4 but with the 4.11 rear.
OK, fine.
I don't think that changes the balance of the input you've already received much at all.

You totally don't need the Cummins for the uses you describe, the 6.4 can handle that duty and then some.
That's just a stone-cold fact.

However, if you want a Cummins for some reason other than needs, that's a different question entirely, and a personal choice driven by something other than practical considerations.

All the points made in this thread about the Cummins/6.4 choice are valid practical considerations, to which you have responded by saying it's all about "specifics" and you're not looking for "judgement", just opinions on your questions.
But you didn't actually ask any specific questions, you simply asked for "thoughts".

Well, guess what, you got some.

In a nutshell; as a practical matter, you don't need the Cummins, and in many ways putting a Cummins in a 2500 doesn't make a whole lot of sense for some very practical reasons.
But in particular, for the applications you have described, there would be no real advantage to the Cummins except possibly saving some pocket change on down the road by reason of its fuel efficiency, but you'd have to drive the truck for a long time and many many miles before you'd start tapping into that savings.
 

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You totally don't need the Cummins for the uses you describe, the 6.4 can handle that duty and then some.
That's just a stone-cold fact.
The 5.7 would handle that without blinking and I'm not a fan of the 5.7 / 3.73 combo in the HD trucks.

The OP didn't say anything about his previous towing experiences / impressions with the 6.4 / 3.73 combo he currently has, which may offer some insight as to the need / desire for 4.10 gears.
 

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On my old 2001 Ram 2500 V10, the 4.10 rear end was excellent. But that was with 16" wheels and a completely different engine. And I am hauling a lot more weight than you are.

FIFY



But in particular, for the applications you have described, there would be no real advantage to the Cummins except possibly saving some pocket change on down the road by reason of its fuel efficiency, but you'd have to drive the truck for a long time and many many miles before you'd start tapping into that savings.



Probably not then either, because the fuel savings is offset by more expensive maintenance
 

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the fuel savings is offset by more expensive maintenance
I have to disagree with that. Oil change, the gasser will get two and in some usage cases three oil changes to the one 15,000 mile for the Cummins.

Fuel filters, changed once ever 15,000 miles at a cost of around $70 to $90 for the filters.

No ignition system to mess with.

Fuel costs, well gas is very volatile with prices on a constant roller coaster and diesel prices remaining practically steady. Last year at this time, gas was running around .25$ a gallon higher than diesel. Today it is a break even or a +- between gas and diesel (Michigan market).
 

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I have to disagree with that. Oil change, the gasser will get two and in some usage cases three oil changes to the one 15,000 mile for the Cummins.

Fuel filters, changed once ever 15,000 miles at a cost of around $70 to $90 for the filters.

No ignition system to mess with.

Fuel costs, well gas is very volatile with prices on a constant roller coaster and diesel prices remaining practically steady. Last year at this time, gas was running around .25$ a gallon higher than diesel. Today it is a break even or a +- between gas and diesel (Michigan market).
But the oil change is more expensive and you have the added cost of DEF. Diesels go through front suspension parts faster because of the added weight
 

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But the oil change is more expensive and you have the added cost of DEF. Diesels go through front suspension parts faster because of the added weight
The front ends are designed to support the additional weight (give RAM's engineers a little credit). I've seen no cases of front end issues on the Cummins forums for stock trucks. There are the folks that lift and run much bigger tires that have issues, but not for those that stay stock.

I can change the oil on my Cummins using a Mopar filter and Rotella T6 for under $60 and I only have to do the change once every 15,000 miles. My 2013 Hemi I can get about 7,000 miles on an oil change which runs me just under $30. I call it a wash.

DEF, really, $8 for 2 1/2 gallons. While how much DEF one uses is based on how many miles you drive, under what towing conditions, if any, with respect to fuel usage, it just isn't enough money to justify a comment about. Six pack of beer is $10, a pack of smokes is $6, a cup of coffee is $1 and if you like Starbucks, then its $3.50.
 

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All this talk about maintenance cost and fuel economy is ok but for me it was a numbers game with towing capacity and payload. The 2500 with a diesel has a high towing capacity, but a lower payload, which means that you may not be able to tow what you want within limits.

My example is a 7600 lb travel trailer, on the 2500, with the tounge weight, passengers, hitch, and bed cargo I was at 2300 lbs payload. That was right at the limit of most Crew cab 2500 diesels, which meant no room grow. With the 6.4L the payload was better, but not great. If you reverse it and look at maxing the payload on the 6.4L in the 2500, you GTW you can tow to stay within GCVW drops to about 8000 lbs. On the diesel it is more, but the payload can't support the tongue weight at 15%.

For these reasons, I went with a 3500 6.4L with 4.10. I can max payload and still put a 12000 lb trailer behind me, tounge weight is supported along with passengers, and bed cargo.

I just can't justify using all of my payload on tongue weight.
 

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All this talk about maintenance cost and fuel economy is ok but for me it was a numbers game with towing capacity and payload. The 2500 with a diesel has a high towing capacity, but a lower payload, which means that you may not be able to tow what you want within limits.

My example is a 7600 lb travel trailer, on the 2500, with the tounge weight, passengers, hitch, and bed cargo I was at 2300 lbs payload. That was right at the limit of most Crew cab 2500 diesels, which meant no room grow. With the 6.4L the payload was better, but not great. If you reverse it and look at maxing the payload on the 6.4L in the 2500, you GTW you can tow to stay within GCVW drops to about 8000 lbs. On the diesel it is more, but the payload can't support the tongue weight at 15%.

For these reasons, I went with a 3500 6.4L with 4.10. I can max payload and still put a 12000 lb trailer behind me, tounge weight is supported along with passengers, and bed cargo.

I just can't justify using all of my payload on tongue weight.

Exact same reason we went with a new 3500 (srw) long bed 6.4L, 4.10 rear end. With our 2360 dry weight camper, and then with a 7-8k fully loaded 3 horse trailer with no wdh, we were maxing out our old 2001 2500(with air bags).

With the new 3500, and a wdh(even without the wdh), we will be well under the limits on the 3500.


And we didn't go with a diesel because we don't tow enough weight to justify the 9k extra cost, and the higher cost of diesel. And yea, the diesel cost has been pretty consistent. Consistently quite a bit higher per gallon than 87 here in Oregon.


Plus, I just love the sound of that 6.4L Hemi. :)
 

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I would wait another year or two for the next gen HD Ram. Interested to see what they do to the drive train as well as the interior. I am going to keep mine for the next 4 to 5 years and then trade it in on the next gen Ram HD. Love my truck!
 
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