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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all, anybody have input on what gas to use in the 2019 hemi ? The book recommends mid grade but says octane 87 will be ok to use. Anybody tried both yet, was there any difference ? I've only had my truck for two week now and been using only 87 octane. Thanks for any input.
 

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Hi all, anybody have input on what gas to use in the 2019 hemi ? The book recommends mid grade but says octane 87 will be ok to use. Anybody tried both yet, was there any difference ? I've only had my truck for two week now and been using only 87 octane. Thanks for any input.
In Colorado our cheap grade is only 85. Over the years I have tried all 3 grades, both empty and towing, and have never found any difference in mileage or power.
 

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Personal preference and your thoughts. I use 89 when tank low, just filling up a lil, use 87.. OP correct, book says 87 acceptable, 89 recommended...
 

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Even the truck is new, the engine is the same- don't waste your money- you will not notice the higher grade. 87 is fine.
 

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I stick with 89 not because I think the truck will explode or anything ........I just do. Per tank, FOR ME, the price is negligible and I'm getting almost 14 days to a tank, so it's all good.

I actually save much much much more money bringing my lunch to work daily and also not eating out regularly. I guess we all have to decide where we want to save money. Again...I don't think the truck will explode on 87, I just follow the recommendation personally.
 

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Ram has had that same recommendation for years. I bought 89 for awhile then the price differential between the gas grades started going up and I switched to 87. Never noticed a bit of difference.



Ram must get some tiny improvement in EPA mileage rating or some such or they would not do it because I'm sure it must cost them a few sales with Ford recommending 87 for theirs.
 

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I stick with 89 not because I think the truck will explode or anything ........I just do. Per tank, FOR ME, the price is negligible and I'm getting almost 14 days to a tank, so it's all good.

I actually save much much much more money bringing my lunch to work daily and also not eating out regularly. I guess we all have to decide where we want to save money. Again...I don't think the truck will explode on 87, I just follow the recommendation personally.


That's ok.
I bring my lunch to work, too- don't know, where those guys get the money from, going out every day for $10+... But I have to admit- Fridays I go with them. That's my treat.
My full tank lasts a week- so I depend a little more on some saved $$$.


Technically it absolute doesn't matter, what you get in your tank, as long as it's gasoline.


The combustion pressure of the Hemi is still in a low range, which allows 87 octane. Also the ignition point is regulated through PCM via knock sensor. The only difference would be in full power demand- but the Hemi has so much power, that it barely ever really needs it- except you pull 10000# up the rocky mountains or so- and even then...
Here the difference is about 30ct. 20 gallons are already $6.00 - 4 tanks $24/ month- well- that's where I save, because I would not get anything out of 89 or higher.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Appreciate all the input guys, unfortunately here in NY the difference is like .50 cents a gallon so if it's not going to make any difference in how the truck will perform then I'll save a few bucks and go with 87 octane.
 

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Copied and pasted from a previous post of mine;

To get the full performance out of your Hemi, you need to use 89 octane or higher. Anything higher than 89 in the hemi, won't give you any additional performance and would give you the equivalent performance of using 89 octane. People in general have a misunderstanding of what octane levels mean. To put it in simple terms, the higher the octane the more difficult it is to ignite the fuel. In high performance motors, designed to put out large HP figures, typically compression is raised to help achieve this higher level of performance. The more you compress a gas/air mixture, the more likely it is to detonate on its own without a spark. That's why high performance motors ask for higher octane, to prevent early detonation by using a fuel with higher octane figure which means it is more difficult to ignite and has a higher tolerance to compression, heat and other factors. If you use a lower octane gas, such as 87 octane in the Hemi, the computer will retard or adjust the timing to compensate and protect the motor from damage, but you will lose some of the performance the engine was designed to put out. The performance lost by using 87 octane is real subtle and won't be noticed by most in normal driving conditions. If you did notice it, it would more likely be at higher RPM under full throttle acceleration or while towing.
 

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@JoeBlow- The problem is, that there are so many internet- mechanics and web sites or Facebook- groups founded by some people who distribute their "Wikipedia- Knowledge" to the world, thinking, they telling something new.
Fact is, that most of the ones, telling the folks, what they want to hear and if you tell the truth, they think, you're a moron.
I see this over and over in Exhaust discussions, Cold Air Intake discussions, K&N Filter Discussions and absolutely in Power-Commander- Discussions, where people study somewhat the box, where it tells the buyer what this thing "can" do, but have actually no idea, what they do with the engine- beside they are absolutely resistant to the fact, that manufacturers pay some people really big bucks to program PCM's. And then, there is some backyard- men shed guy, selling some box with wires and a circuit board for $150.00 (some are really selling the same crap for $750 or more- makes it more powerful, obviously), and people believe, that this thing can enhance performance (without real proof, because when it comes to dyno-test results, there are actually none available or they send out some fake ones - friend of mine is in the dyno test business and I know- a reliable dyno test result cost you $50000 and more) and people buying it, connecting it and have no idea, what they actually do to their engine. There are just a very few, who really know, what they're doing. And if you understand engines, you understand, you can not just simply do one thing and expect better performance.
And when people argue about Octane in an ancient dinosaur engine, which was some time pepped up with some electronic, I usually just sit there and shake my head, tell my 5 cents about it and be done with.
The real reason, why, FCA recommends 89 Octane fuel is, due to the combustion chamber design, the burn-process (yes- it's not an explosion) is more effective and smoother, building up a more steady pressure curve, reaching a slight higher max- pressure than with 87 Octane fuel. A compression ratio up to 10:1 can be easily fueled with 87 Octane fuel.
Turbos are the ones, I would not recommend low grade Octane fuel due to the way higher combustion pressures.
If you want to get around all those Octane confusions: buy a diesel. but there you have the cetane grades.
 

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@JoeBlow- The problem is, that there are so many internet- mechanics and web sites or Facebook- groups founded by some people who distribute their "Wikipedia- Knowledge" to the world, thinking, they telling something new.
Fact is, that most of the ones, telling the folks, what they want to hear and if you tell the truth, they think, you're a moron.
I see this over and over in Exhaust discussions, Cold Air Intake discussions, K&N Filter Discussions and absolutely in Power-Commander- Discussions, where people study somewhat the box, where it tells the buyer what this thing "can" do, but have actually no idea, what they do with the engine- beside they are absolutely resistant to the fact, that manufacturers pay some people really big bucks to program PCM's. And then, there is some backyard- men shed guy, selling some box with wires and a circuit board for $150.00 (some are really selling the same crap for $750 or more- makes it more powerful, obviously), and people believe, that this thing can enhance performance (without real proof, because when it comes to dyno-test results, there are actually none available or they send out some fake ones - friend of mine is in the dyno test business and I know- a reliable dyno test result cost you $50000 and more) and people buying it, connecting it and have no idea, what they actually do to their engine. There are just a very few, who really know, what they're doing. And if you understand engines, you understand, you can not just simply do one thing and expect better performance.
And when people argue about Octane in an ancient dinosaur engine, which was some time pepped up with some electronic, I usually just sit there and shake my head, tell my 5 cents about it and be done with.
The real reason, why, FCA recommends 89 Octane fuel is, due to the combustion chamber design, the burn-process (yes- it's not an explosion) is more effective and smoother, building up a more steady pressure curve, reaching a slight higher max- pressure than with 87 Octane fuel. A compression ratio up to 10:1 can be easily fueled with 87 Octane fuel.
Turbos are the ones, I would not recommend low grade Octane fuel due to the way higher combustion pressures.
If you want to get around all those Octane confusions: buy a diesel. but there you have the cetane grades.
It's far worse in the Harley world. Come to our forum where ppl argue about oils all day and which is the best and which one made their Harley grow wings and fly to the moon. They always some company "paid research" or some unscientific study from a guy who truly wanted it to feel better.......and thus, it felt better. And silly me on the same tried/true oil, riding thousands of miles a year on a number of Harleys for years.

I'm with you......manufacturers spend a lot of money on R&D and I'll stick with their knowledge. I do see claims of "just" a cold air intake increase HP by XYZ and it's so not true, as you said. I increased performance/HP/Torque/ and decreased temp on my Harley, but it took a combination of performance upgrades and a reputable dyno... not just one 'out the box' thing.
 

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It's far worse in the Harley world. Come to our forum where ppl argue about oils all day and which is the best and which one made their Harley grow wings and fly to the moon. They always some company "paid research" or some unscientific study from a guy who truly wanted it to feel better.......and thus, it felt better. And silly me on the same tried/true oil, riding thousands of miles a year on a number of Harleys for years.

I'm with you......manufacturers spend a lot of money on R&D and I'll stick with their knowledge. I do see claims of "just" a cold air intake increase HP by XYZ and it's so not true, as you said. I increased performance/HP/Torque/ and decreased temp on my Harley, but it took a combination of performance upgrades and a reputable dyno... not just one 'out the box' thing.


Funny, that you say this- I was an Yamaha FZR enthusiast and in some Yamaha Forums, especially in a specific FZR forum. Try to convince some wannabe- expert, that if you want high grade silicone- prepped oil, it does exactly the opposite in those ancient engines, of what you expect- and first, you will experience, that your clutch ain't catching anymore, unless you upgrade to a acrylic carbon clutch, which last you approximately 1000 miles. Unless you ain't got a gold- shitting donkey in your backyard, you should distance yourself from such upgrades- this oil is for race-engines with race components and they don't have to last 20000 miles.
And there was the guy wanted to race me, after I told him, that I'm pretty good with my 160 rear wheel and a 190 is just a handicap in curves- we went into the mountains and I smoked 3 cigarettes till he finally showed up at the meeting point. He said, he missed a turn and went the wrong way... :LOL:
Or the one who thought, he has to install racing brake pads against my advise and found out, that it ruined his rotors within 500 miles... but yeah... I'm just a moron who thinks he knows it all... ( I don't know all, but I know, when I'm talking about something)
 

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My 2019 1500 Limited 2WD 22" wheels, 3.21 axle with 1700 miles i try 87 and 89 and Premium and non ethanol rec90 best mileage with rec90 performance same with all grades but burn gas like crazy 12mpg nothing better and always drive alone with no cargo in the back but driving almost on city all the time when get HWY maybe 14mpg after 20 miles it is no traffic
 

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My 2019 1500 Limited 2WD 22" wheels, 3.21 axle with 1700 miles i try 87 and 89 and Premium and non ethanol rec90 best mileage with rec90 performance same with all grades but burn gas like crazy 12mpg nothing better and always drive alone with no cargo in the back but driving almost on city all the time when get HWY maybe 14mpg after 20 miles it is no traffic


The reason is, because ethanol mix is not as efficient as non- ethanol gas. you can drive ethanol and you might see single digit mileage with your driving habits.
short distance driving kills mpg. Also- your engine is not even broke in yet. wait till 10000 miles and check.
if you want to see the real mpg, make a trip through city, country roads and highway and set the counter back before you start. you'll see- 22mpg should be no problem on highway and in mix it should be somewhere around 18-19 mpg.
your mileage tells me- you drive short distance and only city. Ain't I'm right?
 

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Just use 87 octane in your Hemi if you're cruising around ie: not towing or drag racing. Try to get it from a top-tier gas station when at all possible. :smileup:
 

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The reason is, because ethanol mix is not as efficient as non- ethanol gas. you can drive ethanol and you might see single digit mileage with your driving habits.
short distance driving kills mpg. Also- your engine is not even broke in yet. wait till 10000 miles and check.
if you want to see the real mpg, make a trip through city, country roads and highway and set the counter back before you start. you'll see- 22mpg should be no problem on highway and in mix it should be somewhere around 18-19 mpg.
your mileage tells me- you drive short distance and only city. Ain't I'm right?
Yes you Right i drive short distance in city with stop light and stop sign i hope when make long trip follow your advice and set the counter back i let you know thanks
 
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