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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Took it to the dealership and they charged it up told me to come back the next day so they could try to find the leak so I did. It ran fine for the rest of the day. Next morning no ac. Took it to the shop and they said its leaking from the condenser behind the dash and its $1300. They didn't take the dash apart so he can they tell that's where its leaking from? I'm a truck driver and gone from home so I'm going off what my wife says. Anybody else have that problem with losing the ac charge overnight?
 

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take it to a a/c shop if you have one in your area. At the very least you could get a second opinion and also another quote. I'd never go to a dealer for a/c problems, the overhead costs are ridiculous. Also, many places now have sniffers to help find a leak.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I was gonna take it to another place once I got home. I just thought it was weird that they can tell me where it's coming from with out seeing the dash. They also didn't have that sniffer
 

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Losing overnight is probably a pretty decent size leak.

What you could try is refill it yourself with one of those refill cannisters from parts store, Walmart, etc but make sure to get one with dye in the refrigerant. Fill it up, let it leak out and then get a blacklight and try to find where its leaking.

The 2 A/C leaks Ive dealt with in vehicles were both where a soft (rubber) line turns to a hard (aluminum) line. They like to leak at the crimp fittings right where they change over.

If it really is behind the dash, thats one fix Im not sure I would tackle (not because I cant do it, but because of how much work Im guessing is involved to actually get to the leak). I have fixed the lines myself, though. Lots of YouTube research, a set of manifold gauges and a Harbor Freight vac pump worked just fine and saved me a TON of $$$.
 

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The AC system contains oil. Look for oil residue buildup on any of your AC parts - compressor and bearing, condenser (in front of radiator), hoses, hard lines, dryer, connectors, and at the charge valves. The evap coil is under the dash but not sure if you can see it if you pull the blower motor or check the evap drain tube under the truck for oily residue.

I was once told my evap was leaking on an old car I have but the evap was clean and the compressor had been slinging oil (is a mess). The leak was the shaft seal on that one.

Another old car had leaked it precious R12 out from the charge valves, as the sealing gaskets shrunk from age and a tire tool would have fixed it.
 

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Fill it up, using UV De, as mentioned. Two most common leaks spots tend to be the coils. Though front is most common since it gets hit by bugs and stuff. Inside the dash is not really very common. either way, sniffers are handy but dye is best method.
 

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FYI, it's the evaporator that's in the interior behind the dash, not the condenser. Evap leaks can be detected in vents on low blower and sometimes by sniffing the condensate drain. Using the dye might be difficult to detect unless the condensate happens to drag some of the oil out with it. I don't recommend servicing it yourself without some sort of prior experience. Today's systems are very charge sensitive mostly due to very small condenser volume & tube diameters. You can easily pop the PRV or cause system damage by overcharging.
 
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