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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Yup, it's another thread about supercharging the 5.7. I've read a decent amount of the posts on here regarding supercharging the 5.7 and gathered as much info as I could before posting myself, so I'm sorry if I ask any questions that have already been answered.

I have a 2015 Ram 1500 Crew Cab 4x4 with a 5.7 Hemi, and other than a K&N cold air intake and a Spintech muffler, it's bone stock. I've heard people saying that the stock 5.7 is fine and the stock 8HP70 can handle 8lbs of boost with no problem, but not much more.

Now when I pitched the idea of supercharging (without giving many details), I got a lot of concern back from very good dealership technicians, one of which is a master tech (not a Chrysler dealership though), saying that I would "blow up my engine" and that the transfer case, differential, and axles can't handle the extra power. I haven't seen a single person on here so much as mention the drivetrain (other than transmissions).

I have the 3.92 rear end, 215mm front axle, 235mm rear axle, anti-spin differential (rear), and a conventional differential on the front. I'm no expert, but I can't imagine why it wouldn't hold the power.

I'm hoping someone that has done this and preferably someone that has lived with this on their daily driver for some time can give me some insight as to how their trucks and all of the parts on it have been holding up post-supercharging, and if there is absolutely anything mechanical that I need to worry about, big or small.

I plan on running the 2011-2016 Procharger D1SC complete system, btw.

Also, I thought I saw someone saying such extensive modification on the engine can cause the company to default on my loan and take my truck, and honestly that's the only thing that scares me. Any information on that?

edit: possibly dumb question, but will I have to use a different kind of oil with the power increase or is the factory recommended oil fine?
 

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Use full synthetic oil in the same weight.


He is wrong. I nearly doubled the power of my vehicle and nothing blew up in the driveline at 160000 miles of use already on everything. I'm shooting to more than triple it this go around and I was only concerned about the trans (already had it built to take 850 RWHP) and actual drive shaft. All I am gonna do is replace the u joints with billet units and add safety loops. If it blows it blows and even though that is very unlikely given I would only do a full power launch in 4x4 (some TQ goes to the front) and if I tried it in 2wd it would just break traction. Probably won't blow up but I always like shooting for a 50% overkill margin on all my parts, the stock shaft would probably running close to only 10% margin and I don't know how I feel about that. The hemi is a MUCH MUCH MUCH better engine than the 360 magnum and can take way more crap before anything becomes a problem.

Let me put it this way. The axles and T-case and driveshafts can all handle 4x4 low with a 2.63 TQ multiplication ratio without blowing anything up and I have tried to get something to blow to test this very question, I turned it on on pavement and did two figure 8s then inspected the entire system for damage. Aside form my tires eating it all was fine (it was an old set at the time). You won't blow the driveline even at 3x stock TQ output with full traction. It's the trans that will blow before anything else.



My only disclaimer is going to be my truck was babied and is a garage queen that is "over maintained" and I tend to go overkill on my hobbies.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thank you, this was the exact information I needed. I gotta say, I've seen a lot of the threads on here regarding supercharging, and I saw you commented and just about all of them, so it was definitely a relief to see that silver truck on my thread! Seems like you know quite a bit about this specific topic.
 

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Striker is pretty knowledgeable about adding power to a truck, so he weighed in on most of what you asked.

The 9.25 diff is a robust unit (stronger than a Dana 60-some just prefer the Dana because the 9.25 is a c-clip axle) and has been used on 1/2 and 3/4 ton trucks since the 80s if not the 70s. It is still used as the front diff on the HD Rams. I would not be worried about blowing it, it is not like a GM G80 or whatever POS Toyota puts in the Tacoma. Actually the Tundra's 10.5 is probably weaker than a 9.25-I've seen more of them broken.

I am confused by your statement about defaulting though; I am not sure who you mean by "the company," but neither the bank not Chrysler can default on your loan. Only you can do that since you are making payments. The loan is a contractual relationship, and as long as you make your payments nobody can take your truck from you (breach of contract and violation of due process/search and seizure)
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I am confused by your statement about defaulting though; I am not sure who you mean by "the company," but neither the bank not Chrysler can default on your loan. Only you can do that since you are making payments. The loan is a contractual relationship, and as long as you make your payments nobody can take your truck from you (breach of contract and violation of due process/search and seizure)
I recall seeing someone on here post something along the lines of "just read your loan statement very carefully", though I tried looking for the post and I could not find it again, so I couldn't go over it. Just wanna be very sure that I'm safe in doing this when the time comes to actually do it.

Thanks a ton guys, this has all been very helpful!
 

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I've run the D1SC on a hemi in my truck for a few years and as long as it's tuned properly you won't have any issues with the engine. The hypereutectoid pistons do have an issue with popping the upper ring land if the cylinder temps get to high which causes the piston ring ends to touch, expand, and pop the top. This is commonly caused by either a poor tune or an extended lean condition. Bone stock pistons can handle up to 8psi if tuned properly and if you run water/meth you can take that up to 10psi and you can either run it straight for the cooling or you can tune for the water/meth. If you tune for it be aware that you can't ever have the tank run dry or you'll be seriously lean and bad things can happen.

The 8hp70 will handle any bolt-on supercharger kit and has been handling up to 600hp in stock form in several trucks at this point. With the 8 speed you don't have to worry about your trans. Since yours is a crew cab you don't have to worry about the driveshaft critical speed for a while unlike the reg cab trucks. The diffs and transfer case will handle the power as well. I've never seen or heard of any failing from too much power and my 9.25/8.0" combo was taking 680ft-lb for 3 years with 4wd launches. I have seen diffs blow out gears from various forms of abuse like from burn-outs. The OEM trac-loc carrier has a problem with burning up the clutches and turning it into an open diff so if you want to handle things before they become a problem you can do a Tru-Trac swap from the 9.25 Chrysler into the ZF rear diff. We've done several of these and no failures to date with that swap.

The thing you might be confusing the 'loan statement' is with the insurance coverage. They can't take your truck away unless you stop paying the required payments, there is no other agreement beyond that, however your insurance can drop coverage without warning if they find out you have added performance mods to the vehicle. I contacted my insurance company and told them straight up that I was going to put a supercharger on my truck and I wanted it noted on my policy which they did so now if I'm ever in an accident there is record of it and they can't deny coverage for the mod. Now, you don't need to tell them what supercharger it is or how much power you're making unless you're looking to get racing coverage but don't go down that road unless you're looking at getting into roll-cage requiring ETs. My insurance knows I have a supercharger, they don't know that it's a F-1A pushing 17psi and making ~700hp in a lowered truck capable of 273km/hr.
 

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I've run the D1SC on a hemi in my truck for a few years and as long as it's tuned properly you won't have any issues with the engine. The hypereutectoid pistons do have an issue with popping the upper ring land if the cylinder temps get to high which causes the piston ring ends to touch, expand, and pop the top. This is commonly caused by either a poor tune or an extended lean condition. Bone stock pistons can handle up to 8psi if tuned properly and if you run water/meth you can take that up to 10psi and you can either run it straight for the cooling or you can tune for the water/meth. If you tune for it be aware that you can't ever have the tank run dry or you'll be seriously lean and bad things can happen.

The 8hp70 will handle any bolt-on supercharger kit and has been handling up to 600hp in stock form in several trucks at this point. With the 8 speed you don't have to worry about your trans. Since yours is a crew cab you don't have to worry about the driveshaft critical speed for a while unlike the reg cab trucks. The diffs and transfer case will handle the power as well. I've never seen or heard of any failing from too much power and my 9.25/8.0" combo was taking 680ft-lb for 3 years with 4wd launches. I have seen diffs blow out gears from various forms of abuse like from burn-outs. The OEM trac-loc carrier has a problem with burning up the clutches and turning it into an open diff so if you want to handle things before they become a problem you can do a Tru-Trac swap from the 9.25 Chrysler into the ZF rear diff. We've done several of these and no failures to date with that swap.

The thing you might be confusing the 'loan statement' is with the insurance coverage. They can't take your truck away unless you stop paying the required payments, there is no other agreement beyond that, however your insurance can drop coverage without warning if they find out you have added performance mods to the vehicle. I contacted my insurance company and told them straight up that I was going to put a supercharger on my truck and I wanted it noted on my policy which they did so now if I'm ever in an accident there is record of it and they can't deny coverage for the mod. Now, you don't need to tell them what supercharger it is or how much power you're making unless you're looking to get racing coverage but don't go down that road unless you're looking at getting into roll-cage requiring ETs. My insurance knows I have a supercharger, they don't know that it's a F-1A pushing 17psi and making ~700hp in a lowered truck capable of 273km/hr.
There is the rest of the info needed, as I already mentioned you will be fine with your stock driveline and a super. Good mention with the ZF LSD swap, I totally forgot about that.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
A differential swap, hmm. Wouldn't have thought of that on my own. That's good to know. Thanks for all the help here guys, hopefully the next clueless guy can use this whole thread for reference.
 
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