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I like Toyo Open Country tires, there are others that have used the Falken Wildpeak I think they are called and like them.

Yokohama Geolanders are good tires as well, those would be my three picks. When my current tires are worn out on my 2019 Ram 1500 Classic I am going with a set of Yokohama Geolanders.
 

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Go to Discount Tire web site and look around. Cooper, Falken, General, Nitto, Maxxis, Hankook and many more make some good all terrain tires.
 

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19 RAM 1500 5.7 Etorque. Falcon Wildpeak AT3W/ JMS PedalMax/weatherTech TechLiner/Gator Quad fold
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I need help choosing a good/great all-terrain tire for 2016 ram 1500 bighorn 4x4 w/2in level kit
My top pick ...Falken Wildpeak AT3W (used in gravel, snow, rock, full off road trails so far) LT version is a little heavy though.

2. Ridge Grapplers or Trail Grapplers
3. Open Country A/T
I would avoid Cooper only because the sidewall tread is almost non-existent. Also would avoid KO2's as many people have told me after about 20k miles the traction declines rapidly.
 

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The question is- what do you want to do with them? If it's just regular driving around, like 98% of every American person, you don't need those expensive super duper tires- to be honest- the only difference you would notice- the ones are a little bit louder than the others.
I did not want to have a Chinese no name thingens, so I am now hooked for years on cooper tires- I have the 17" rims- so 265/70 R17 is my tire size- I pay incl. mounting $130. per tire. They last me around 40k miles - which is about 2 years- and that's ok. My strategy is: I put the new ones to the front axle, when the rear are done, I move the front to the rear and put new ones to the front. this way, I just have to buy 2 new tires every year instead of 4 at the same time.
I worked for 20 years at the dealer and I can tell you one thing- If you go there, the best tire is always the one they bought a good badge of for a discounted price. From there- If you don't have some high expectations, want to ride like a government- limousine through the world, you need Michelins.
If you drive bit offroad and need grip in the pasture, get a bit rougher profile.
If you just drive to work and back and once a year in vacation, get the cheapest name brand.
If you tow heavy trailers, get a E-Rated tire.
Other than that- make sure, they're black and round. that's it.
 

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The question is- what do you want to do with them? If it's just regular driving around, like 98% of every American person, you don't need those expensive super duper tires- to be honest- the only difference you would notice- the ones are a little bit louder than the others.
I did not want to have a Chinese no name thingens, so I am now hooked for years on cooper tires- I have the 17" rims- so 265/70 R17 is my tire size- I pay incl. mounting $130. per tire. They last me around 40k miles - which is about 2 years- and that's ok. My strategy is: I put the new ones to the front axle, when the rear are done, I move the front to the rear and put new ones to the front. this way, I just have to buy 2 new tires every year instead of 4 at the same time.
I worked for 20 years at the dealer and I can tell you one thing- If you go there, the best tire is always the one they bought a good badge of for a discounted price. From there- If you don't have some high expectations, want to ride like a government- limousine through the world, you need Michelins.
If you drive bit offroad and need grip in the pasture, get a bit rougher profile.
If you just drive to work and back and once a year in vacation, get the cheapest name brand.
If you tow heavy trailers, get a E-Rated tire.
Other than that- make sure, they're black and round. that's it.
I know typically we see eye to eye and all. Buuut....2 new tires every year is the most absurd thing I've ever heard. Plus...that whole statement wasnt even on topic. Lmao.
 

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I know typically we see eye to eye and all. Buuut....2 new tires every year is the most absurd thing I've ever heard. Plus...that whole statement wasnt even on topic. Lmao.
The statement summary is: as long as they're black and round they're just fine for every day use.

And yes 2 tires make more sense than buying every 2 year or earlier 4 of them. I do that for over 35 years now and never had an issue with it.
 

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The statement summary is: as long as they're black and round they're just fine for every day use.

And yes 2 tires make more sense than buying every 2 year or earlier 4 of them. I do that for over 35 years now and never had an issue with it.
But that's a complete waste of money. Nowadays good quality All-Terrain tires will last 4 years. That's why they're more expensive now. Not only that but if there's a tread depth difference on the old two compared to new 2 tires...that can cause serious problems if you're running a 4wd or even AWD vehicle. Sorry man, I mean no disrespect...just can't wrap my head around that logic. Also ..the OP requested good All Terrain tire recommendations, which you're statement did not address.
 

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But that's a complete waste of money. Nowadays good quality All-Terrain tires will last 4 years. That's why they're more expensive now. Not only that but if there's a tread depth difference on the old two compared to new 2 tires...that can cause serious problems if you're running a 4wd or even AWD vehicle. Sorry man, I mean no disrespect...just can't wrap my head around that logic. Also ..the OP requested good All Terrain tire recommendations, which you're statement did not address.
I drive about 20000 miles highway per year. My tires don't last 4 years. Yes, I have 4wd, but I only use it in my pasture. And here, every tire works with 4wd. Besides, in the RAM, which is a 4x4, the 4wd is not made for the roads- so either you go with one with 4wd auto or you drive a lot of wasteful weight around. And for those 3x a year I put it in 4wd auto, it will not hurt. I always make sure, I have good profile in winter- 2-3 mm profile difference does not hurt the 4wd.
All terrain tires are a waste, if you don't live somewhere in the boonies and have to feed your cows or horses somewhere on your 100 acre farm in all weather conditions. Or maybe in Alaska.
But for normal driving, there is more disadvantages than advantages. Noisy, fuel consuming and wear vs. A not noticeable increase of traction for 20 minutes per year.
Yeah- they look cool. That's about it.
I'm 35 years in the business, 20 years at the dealership. I had tire trainings at Michelin, Goodyear and Bridgestone. You would be surprised, how much false information is carried around for generations already. Trust me- a normal person might feel the difference between a cheap Chinese plastic tire vs. A normal, in the US produced one- everything else is imagination and difference in noises- which is in case of all terrain tires neglectible.
 

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I drive about 20000 miles highway per year. My tires don't last 4 years. Yes, I have 4wd, but I only use it in my pasture. And here, every tire works with 4wd. Besides, in the RAM, which is a 4x4, the 4wd is not made for the roads- so either you go with one with 4wd auto or you drive a lot of wasteful weight around. And for those 3x a year I put it in 4wd auto, it will not hurt. I always make sure, I have good profile in winter- 2-3 mm profile difference does not hurt the 4wd.
All terrain tires are a waste, if you don't live somewhere in the boonies and have to feed your cows or horses somewhere on your 100 acre farm in all weather conditions. Or maybe in Alaska.
But for normal driving, there is more disadvantages than advantages. Noisy, fuel consuming and wear vs. A not noticeable increase of traction for 20 minutes per year.
Yeah- they look cool. That's about it.
I'm 35 years in the business, 20 years at the dealership. I had tire trainings at Michelin, Goodyear and Bridgestone. You would be surprised, how much false information is carried around for generations already. Trust me- a normal person might feel the difference between a cheap Chinese plastic tire vs. A normal, in the US produced one- everything else is imagination and difference in noises- which is in case of all terrain tires neglectible.
But you're assuming that the OP doesn't live In a place where A/T tires are needed or recommended. He didn't ask if they're a waste of money...he asked for good recommendations. So not only have you not used A/T tires and can't recommend any good ones ...you don't have any experience running true 4WD from what I've read. I Have A/T tires...I live in the city of Las Vegas, but take trips to the mountains, forests of Flagstaff/Prescott AZ where A/T tires are very much needed. Not only that...but in Mt Charleston during the winter...if we're spotted by LE not having either snow or A/T tires...we get fined and towed back to the city lol. A/T tires make a huge difference and good ones work great on the highway too. Anyone that says otherwise just doesn't have any experience with them.
 

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But you're assuming that the OP doesn't live In a place where A/T tires are needed or recommended. He didn't ask if they're a waste of money...he asked for good recommendations. So not only have you not used A/T tires and can't recommend any good ones ...you don't have any experience running true 4WD from what I've read. I Have A/T tires...I live in the city of Las Vegas, but take trips to the mountains, forests of Flagstaff/Prescott AZ where A/T tires are very much needed. Not only that...but in Mt Charleston during the winter...if we're spotted by LE not having either snow or A/T tires...we get fined and towed back to the city lol. A/T tires make a huge difference and good ones work great on the highway too. Anyone that says otherwise just doesn't have any experience with them.
Well, I gave my advise, as you was able to read and still are. And bold of you to assume I don't have 4wd experience. I worked 20 years at VW/ Audi- pioneer of Quattro. And I have 4wd vehicles all the time. I put my 4wd in, when I need it- and that's when my property is wet and sucky- if it's dry- I don't even need it. If I would think like you, I would be tempted to say, that you have no idea, what 4wd is, what all wheel drive is, what the differences are and what their advantages and disadvantages are and where they are used. And I can tell you- a 4wd concept like in the RAM is absolute no concept for the road, as there is no clutch between front wheels and rear wheels, which allows the slip in curves, forcing the drive train into destructive tensions. the 4wd in a RAM is only for slippery ground- such as gravel, sand, mud, etc- and also- the 4wd in a ram is actually a joke, as it lacks locking differentials, which has to be either ordered separately or you have to buy a special model- like the power wagon or the rebel to have it. The only 4wd useful for the road is the 4wd with auto function, where the 4wd only adapts, when it's needed and the sensors detect spinning wheels - it comes on and off. If you're an offroad enthusiast, yes- you need 4wd differently, than someone like me- and 98% of all 4wd owners, who simply want to have it, in case they get stuck. For me, especially, as I was pulling a heavy camper and if you know the gravel laden camp grounds, you know, without 4wd sometimes you have a hard time to get out of the camp site. But even the 4wd is no guarantee to get out, as if you really get stuck, one rear wheel and one front wheel will simply just spin- as result of missing lock. True 4wd is also only to be used in offroad. and trust me- I've been in some situations and the tires really don't do a thing, when the technical factor is not there- if you have a normal Truck with normal 4wd- it really doesn't matter. Or you put real offroad tires on there, which are ruined within 10000 miles on the road- there yes- you have a difference- but intermedium tires- they are just for the looks- ergo- the best tires are the black round ones which are not coming from china.
 

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Well, I gave my advise, as you was able to read and still are. And bold of you to assume I don't have 4wd experience. I worked 20 years at VW/ Audi- pioneer of Quattro. And I have 4wd vehicles all the time. I put my 4wd in, when I need it- and that's when my property is wet and sucky- if it's dry- I don't even need it. If I would think like you, I would be tempted to say, that you have no idea, what 4wd is, what all wheel drive is, what the differences are and what their advantages and disadvantages are and where they are used. And I can tell you- a 4wd concept like in the RAM is absolute no concept for the road, as there is no clutch between front wheels and rear wheels, which allows the slip in curves, forcing the drive train into destructive tensions. the 4wd in a RAM is only for slippery ground- such as gravel, sand, mud, etc- and also- the 4wd in a ram is actually a joke, as it lacks locking differentials, which has to be either ordered separately or you have to buy a special model- like the power wagon or the rebel to have it. The only 4wd useful for the road is the 4wd with auto function, where the 4wd only adapts, when it's needed and the sensors detect spinning wheels - it comes on and off. If you're an offroad enthusiast, yes- you need 4wd differently, than someone like me- and 98% of all 4wd owners, who simply want to have it, in case they get stuck. For me, especially, as I was pulling a heavy camper and if you know the gravel laden camp grounds, you know, without 4wd sometimes you have a hard time to get out of the camp site. But even the 4wd is no guarantee to get out, as if you really get stuck, one rear wheel and one front wheel will simply just spin- as result of missing lock. True 4wd is also only to be used in offroad. and trust me- I've been in some situations and the tires really don't do a thing, when the technical factor is not there- if you have a normal Truck with normal 4wd- it really doesn't matter. Or you put real offroad tires on there, which are ruined within 10000 miles on the road- there yes- you have a difference- but intermedium tires- they are just for the looks- ergo- the best tires are the black round ones which are not coming from china.
VW/Audi don't make 4wd vehicles. I don't even know how that comes into play here. I apologize for accusing you of not knowing anything about 4wd.... knowing about it and actually knowing how to use it are two different things. TC and ESC need to be disengaged in order for 4wd to really be effective in harsh conditions. But I agree with the 4WD Auto statement...on the off road trails with snow...the Auto comes in handy for sure which is what I like about it. As far as 4wd not having a clutch....really? We both know without a clutch the transfer case wouldn't be able to lock into 4wd. Clutch PACK is what I hope you meant. But again... recommending "black, round tires" is not a A/T recommendation at all.
 

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VW/Audi don't make 4wd vehicles. I don't even know how that comes into play here. I apologize for accusing you of not knowing anything about 4wd.... knowing about it and actually knowing how to use it are two different things. TC and ESC need to be disengaged in order for 4wd to really be effective in harsh conditions. But I agree with the 4WD Auto statement...on the off road trails with snow...the Auto comes in handy for sure which is what I like about it. As far as 4wd not having a clutch....really? We both know without a clutch the transfer case wouldn't be able to lock into 4wd. Clutch PACK is what I hope you meant. But again... recommending "black, round tires" is not a A/T recommendation at all.
Ah... VW/Audi does not make 4wd vehicles. didn't know that. Thanks for telling me.
And the clutch for the 4wd to engage the front axle is there to create a connection- but if the connection is instated, the front and the rear axle have no slip- that's why you get tension, when you turn. In a AWD vehicle, where all wheels are permanently propelled, there is a visco clutch- or Torson Differential installed, which allows for the rear and the front axle to have different rpm's in certain range- this is, what makes it paved road capable. Today, those vehicles are also with intelligent wheel management equipped, which allows with different systems to make sure, all wheels having power- you can do that either with brake application or with slip differentials, where you have, like in the visco clutch for either front or rear wheels, multiple disks floating in a silicone based mass, which hardens, when it detects slip and creates the connection progressively. you don't have this in a 4wd. There you have the differential lock, which locks the left and the right wheel, so both spinning at the same time. This is the same lock, how you switch from 2- to 4wd- either manually or automatic. The clutch for the 4wd auto is somewhat capable of slipping- but if you drive permanently with 4wd auto, you will burn it- it's not made and not meant to be a permanent drive, as it then would be an AWD vehicle- then, the clutch would be also differently designed.
As I said- a 4wd is only good, if you either drive offroad or just use it for getting out, when you're somewhat stuck to a certain degree. Fact is- 90% with 4wd don't even use it more than 3 times during ownership- they just have it for bragging. I understand, in the north, I would want it too, to be able to get more traction on snow and ice- but below a certain line- if you don't go offroad or pull a heavy trailer and need it every once in a while because you sit on gravel uphil, its' a waste of money. From this point of view- you can put offroad tires on it, as much as you want- if you get stuck, mostly one wheel will spin and the other will just sit there- on both axles. And actually- the heavy duty profile increases this, as the wheel with grip can't slip, which would make it possible to get part of the rpm to the wheel on hard(er) ground. If the wheel would slip, it could get a just enough grip to get out. - so if you really want to have 4wd and drive offroad, you can't get around a lock differential and true 4wd lock, how you have in a Power Wagon ( I'm not sure at this point, if the Rebel even has it).
If you look at those facts, Offroad tires are not needed at all, as long as you don't plan to go in an offroad park and crawl up the mud-piles and waddle through the creeks, like jeeps do- and can- because they have the axle and differential locks- and there- again- offroad tires make sense.
 

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Ah... VW/Audi does not make 4wd vehicles. didn't know that. Thanks for telling me.
And the clutch for the 4wd to engage the front axle is there to create a connection- but if the connection is instated, the front and the rear axle have no slip- that's why you get tension, when you turn. In a AWD vehicle, where all wheels are permanently propelled, there is a visco clutch- or Torson Differential installed, which allows for the rear and the front axle to have different rpm's in certain range- this is, what makes it paved road capable. Today, those vehicles are also with intelligent wheel management equipped, which allows with different systems to make sure, all wheels having power- you can do that either with brake application or with slip differentials, where you have, like in the visco clutch for either front or rear wheels, multiple disks floating in a silicone based mass, which hardens, when it detects slip and creates the connection progressively. you don't have this in a 4wd. There you have the differential lock, which locks the left and the right wheel, so both spinning at the same time. This is the same lock, how you switch from 2- to 4wd- either manually or automatic. The clutch for the 4wd auto is somewhat capable of slipping- but if you drive permanently with 4wd auto, you will burn it- it's not made and not meant to be a permanent drive, as it then would be an AWD vehicle- then, the clutch would be also differently designed.
As I said- a 4wd is only good, if you either drive offroad or just use it for getting out, when you're somewhat stuck to a certain degree. Fact is- 90% with 4wd don't even use it more than 3 times during ownership- they just have it for bragging. I understand, in the north, I would want it too, to be able to get more traction on snow and ice- but below a certain line- if you don't go offroad or pull a heavy trailer and need it every once in a while because you sit on gravel uphil, its' a waste of money. From this point of view- you can put offroad tires on it, as much as you want- if you get stuck, mostly one wheel will spin and the other will just sit there- on both axles. And actually- the heavy duty profile increases this, as the wheel with grip can't slip, which would make it possible to get part of the rpm to the wheel on hard(er) ground. If the wheel would slip, it could get a just enough grip to get out. - so if you really want to have 4wd and drive offroad, you can't get around a lock differential and true 4wd lock, how you have in a Power Wagon ( I'm not sure at this point, if the Rebel even has it).
If you look at those facts, Offroad tires are not needed at all, as long as you don't plan to go in an offroad park and crawl up the mud-piles and waddle through the creeks, like jeeps do- and can- because they have the axle and differential locks- and there- again- offroad tires make sense.
Yep. I know...not sure why you posted all of that. But no one said anything about off-road tires (those are M/T) we're talking about All-Terrain tires. And yes ..there is a difference. Any 4wd and even some AWD vehicles can benefit from A/T tires. Even if it's just for improved wet road traction. So what brand/model of A/T do you recommend? Or have you never used any A/T tires?
 

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My top pick ...Falken Wildpeak AT3W (used in gravel, snow, rock, full off road trails so far) LT version is a little heavy though.

2. Ridge Grapplers or Trail Grapplers
3. Open Country A/T
I would avoid Cooper only because the sidewall tread is almost non-existent. Also would avoid KO2's as many people have told me after about 20k miles the traction declines rapidly.
I too have the Falken Wildpeak AT3W and will get another set when these wear out!
 

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I would check out Kenda Klever RTs. They are a in between an AT and MT. Very well built and icing on the cake is that they are inexpensive compared to most AT tires. You can find them through Walmart. Best tire I ever had on my Toyota and will be going on my Ram Minotaur soon.
 

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I’ve had a great experience with the Cooper STT Pro’s on ny truck. You will need to go up to at least a 295/60/20 but they hold up great, not noisy, and handle great in all weather. I would highly suggest getting them.
 

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Since everyone is talking about tires and differentials, I would like some advice. I have a 2015 1500 Ecodisel 2-wheel drive with KUMHO Road Venture LT 285/65 R18 tires. To my embarrassment, I had to use my 2005 Cadillac SRX AWD to pull it out of my front yard the first week after purchasing. My house is a regular residential home, grass in front, driveway, concrete sidewalk in front with grass strip and curb between sidewalk and street. I park the RAM in the dirt next to the driveway and I back it in. I pop over the curb, over the sidewalk and onto the dirt. Well, one time that week, and never again, when the front wheels hit the curb, I let it stop me instead of going a little faster to go over the curb. Turns out, the rear wheels just past the sidewalk. So when totally stopped, I couldn't get enough traction from the rear wheels to pull the front wheels over the curb, so I dug 2 holes with the rear wheels. Then when I tried to go forward, the sidewalk was now like the curb and I couldn't get traction to climb that. So I had my SRX to pull it.

Now my 2 questions are. Would a better tire have gotten me out? And with 2 holes dug by both my rear tires mean I have limited slip differentials or some else?
 

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Since everyone is talking about tires and differentials, I would like some advice. I have a 2015 1500 Ecodisel 2-wheel drive with KUMHO Road Venture LT 285/65 R18 tires. To my embarrassment, I had to use my 2005 Cadillac SRX AWD to pull it out of my front yard the first week after purchasing. My house is a regular residential home, grass in front, driveway, concrete sidewalk in front with grass strip and curb between sidewalk and street. I park the RAM in the dirt next to the driveway and I back it in. I pop over the curb, over the sidewalk and onto the dirt. Well, one time that week, and never again, when the front wheels hit the curb, I let it stop me instead of going a little faster to go over the curb. Turns out, the rear wheels just past the sidewalk. So when totally stopped, I couldn't get enough traction from the rear wheels to pull the front wheels over the curb, so I dug 2 holes with the rear wheels. Then when I tried to go forward, the sidewalk was now like the curb and I couldn't get traction to climb that. So I had my SRX to pull it.

Now my 2 questions are. Would a better tire have gotten me out? And with 2 holes dug by both my rear tires mean I have limited slip differentials or some else?
If you didn't disable your traction control before those holes were dug it is a possibility that's it's LSD, but hard to say without seeing the truck for myself. As far as whether or not tires would've helped...what kind of tires do you currently have on it?
 

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I too have the Falken Wildpeak AT3W and will get another set when these wear out!
For sure. I was even thinking if I end up trading in my Ram for a Grand Cherokee or Gladiator I would still put the Wildpeaks on lol.
 
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