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Sure! Why not? This guy put his inverter in the Ram Box.



You can put one in the dash, you just have to get the inverter and associated parts and wiring. You don't have to go as far as this guy though.
 

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Seems logical that the parts could be added, though oftentimes logic doesn't seem to have much to do with how vehicles are designed.

A quick internet search makes it appear that you'd need at least these parts:

Power Outlet: 68159295AB
Inverter: 05026486AA

There are also a bunch of references to seat modules, meaning that perhaps additional wiring is contained in the wiring for power seats. However, it's 4 am on a Saturday and I haven't finished my first cup of coffee so I could be wrong.

Edit: I found a discussion on another forum regarding this same thing. I will PM you the link (they probably don't want me posting link to other forums here).
 

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The 2009 Ram SLT had a 115vac inverter mounted on the passenger seat frame, under the cushion
It was a Low Amp unit though
 

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That inverter in the the Ram box would be a HUGE help with what I do for a living. (HUD property inspector) Anyone have an idea where I can get one similar to the one pictured? Much better then lugging around my 8000 watt generator. I need at least a 8000 watt one with a 240V outlet. I searched thru google but am not finding one like this. It looks like a Rigid product but I did not see it on their site. Thanks in advance!
 

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That inverter in the the Ram box would be a HUGE help with what I do for a living. (HUD property inspector) Anyone have an idea where I can get one similar to the one pictured? Much better then lugging around my 8000 watt generator. I need at least a 8000 watt one with a 240V outlet. I searched thru google but am not finding one like this. It looks like a Rigid product but I did not see it on their site. Thanks in advance!
Not much of a chance for 8000 watts & 240 volts. The amperage draw from that size inverter would be huge. You would have to have a bank of batteries and a couple of alternators that would probably tax the biggest alternators you could get with the Cummins 6.7L. I have a 2000 watt Xantrex pure sine wave inverter that draws 250-300 amps DC at full load @ 115 volts. The one I have can be paired with one just like it to produce 240 volts but it would draw close to 600 amps at full load. Even that would be only half of the 8000 watts you want. I think the generator is your best option and far cheaper. Just one of the inverters I have is $2500 and you can only combine two of them together.
I'm sure an electrical engineer could make up something for you but the price and the extra battery reserve would kill you. The only thing I have ever saw that big, are off grid power supplies for houses that use wind or solar power to run their homes and they usually have a bank of 8D batteries for power storage consisting of 10 to 20 batteries weighing close to 4000 pounds and even they only have about 4000 to 5000 watts available to them.

The one you see pictured might be a 6600 watt peak for just a few seconds but from what I see from the size of the cables feeding it, there isn't anyway you would get 6600 watts out of that inverter not to mention the paired receptacles are only good for 1800 watts each (120 volts x 15 amps = 1800 watts). So the maximum is 3600 watts and that amount would trip the circuit breakers. Do the math and don't be misled.

The bottom line is Cheap inverters are very misleading and are all about marketing for the uneducated in electrical theory.
 

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Let's see:

0000 gauge will conduct 340 amps and 0 gauge 240, assuming zero voltage drop. So to conduct the current of 550 amps at 12v (6600 watts) you would need two 0000 cables.

0000 cable has a 0.46" diameter conductor, so add some insulation and you'd be up around 5/8" diameter.

I don't believe that's what's shown in the picture.
 

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Let's see:

0000 gauge will conduct 340 amps and 0 gauge 240, assuming zero voltage drop. So to conduct the current of 550 amps at 12v (6600 watts) you would need two 0000 cables.

0000 cable has a 0.46" diameter conductor, so add some insulation and you'd be up around 5/8" diameter.

I don't believe that's what's shown in the picture.
Definitely not.
 

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I just checked into this on Thursday. Like above, the service guy found the two parts listed above and thought this was too easy so he got the service guy who said, it was a royal pain and would end up costing a bunch on labor due to wiring issues. It is not just a module plug in. He said go buy a good one and plug it in the 12 volt. Sounds like a plan to me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I just checked into this on Thursday. Like above, the service guy found the two parts listed above and thought this was too easy so he got the service guy who said, it was a royal pain and would end up costing a bunch on labor due to wiring issues. It is not just a module plug in. He said go buy a good one and plug it in the 12 volt. Sounds like a plan to me.
Thanks for the info!
 
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