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no, if they are in good shape, give them a good visual inspection and if they look good put them back on. replace if you have any cracks tares
 

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well..you'll be changin the e3's out when you start throwin codes..our coil packs don't like the resistence and the pcm will go nuts...
 

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well..you'll be changin the e3's out when you start throwin codes..our coil packs don't like the resistence and the pcm will go nuts...
Fred, we've talked about this before. I'm still searching and trying to find a definitive reason why some plugs would affect coil performance negatively or cause the ECM to detect an error and show a code. I've read quite a few studies and tests on many internet sites from companies and individuals about the issue of spark plug design, performance, and effects. Now, I will say I'm not a fan of multiple or form manipulated electrodes on spark plugs. Even many studies show a possible interference with the flame front in a combustion chamber depending on how the plug is indexed into the head when tightening. This can change with different engines and their specific plug location and combustion chamber design. However, the issue of precious metal plugs like platinum and iridium have a huge consesus of having almost no negatives in performance and only a slight negative in cost.

About the only things that can cause a coil or ECM grief in the area of plugs from what I've experienced and read on the issue is too much energy demanded to fire a plug or a great deal of RF or EMI energy being emitted to affect radio signal or electronic components...like the ECM, an ignition module, etc. These days, almost all spark plugs for modern vehcile use are resistor rated, and even the plug wires or coil boots/connectors are designed with resistance to stop these emissions. The spark plug, whether it's made of old-school, conventional materials or precious metal at the firing points, takes about the same energy to fire...when new. All precious metal plugs do is allow the firing contact points to resist breakdown over time and therefore preserve the quality of the spark. I'm still not finding anything in the research I've done to indicate why a precious metal plug should cause a problem in our trucks...as long as the heat range and other obvious design issues compared to the OEM plug are adhered to.

Again, I'm not saying there isn't something that won't cause a performance issue...just wishing there was a definitive answer from Dodge or someone that wasn't just speculative. With those police spec Chargers and such now equipped with precious metal plugs, there's obviously the capability of a hemi being able to run them. It would just be good to know if there was some other spec change in the ECM, coils, etc., that is allowing it...or nothing different at all.

Fred, I notice your truck in your profile is an '05 if I remember correctly. Is there something potentially different there that's causing the issue you experienced? And please understand...I'm not continually bringing this up to be argumentative. I truly want to know what he bottom line is on this plug issue.
 

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well..you'll be changin the e3's out when you start throwin codes..our coil packs don't like the resistence and the pcm will go nuts...
I agree! :)

Fred, we've talked about this before. I'm still searching and trying to find a definitive reason why some plugs would affect coil performance negatively or cause the ECM to detect an error and show a code. I've read quite a few studies and tests on many internet sites from companies and individuals about the issue of spark plug design, performance, and effects. Now, I will say I'm not a fan of multiple or form manipulated electrodes on spark plugs. Even many studies show a possible interference with the flame front in a combustion chamber depending on how the plug is indexed into the head when tightening. This can change with different engines and their specific plug location and combustion chamber design. However, the issue of precious metal plugs like platinum and iridium have a huge consesus of having almost no negatives in performance and only a slight negative in cost.

About the only things that can cause a coil or ECM grief in the area of plugs from what I've experienced and read on the issue is too much energy demanded to fire a plug or a great deal of RF or EMI energy being emitted to affect radio signal or electronic components...like the ECM, an ignition module, etc. These days, almost all spark plugs for modern vehcile use are resistor rated, and even the plug wires or coil boots/connectors are designed with resistance to stop these emissions. The spark plug, whether it's made of old-school, conventional materials or precious metal at the firing points, takes about the same energy to fire...when new. All precious metal plugs do is allow the firing contact points to resist breakdown over time and therefore preserve the quality of the spark. I'm still not finding anything in the research I've done to indicate why a precious metal plug should cause a problem in our trucks...as long as the heat range and other obvious design issues compared to the OEM plug are adhered to.

Again, I'm not saying there isn't something that won't cause a performance issue...just wishing there was a definitive answer from Dodge or someone that wasn't just speculative. With those police spec Chargers and such now equipped with precious metal plugs, there's obviously the capability of a hemi being able to run them. It would just be good to know if there was some other spec change in the ECM, coils, etc., that is allowing it...or nothing different at all.

Fred, I notice your truck in your profile is an '05 if I remember correctly. Is there something potentially different there that's causing the issue you experienced? And please understand...I'm not continually bringing this up to be argumentative. I truly want to know what he bottom line is on this plug issue.
I too have searched the bowls of the internet to find a definitive answer, but to not avail, so can only offer real world experience(s).

I have or have assisted in changing the plugs in multiple Ram Hemi engines from 2003 to 2011, in both 1500 (MDS version) and 2500 (non-MDS version). I have NOT had the same experience with the Hemi's in cars, but heard from numerous sources that the experiences I've had are repeated in the cars.

In all cases, the engines 'appeared' to run fine at first, and in some cases the owner of the truck registered a performance increase through the butt dyno. I never registered such increase, but am not going to burst anyone's bubble. In all cases, shortly after the plugs were changed (days) the engines started to show a poor idle condition and random misfires. This of course lead to the throwing of codes and in a few cases, coils went bad.

This is NOT a scientific test, nor does it explain why the issue shows up. All I can say is it has happened in 100% of the cases. My field test is by no means comprehensive, but does represent a sampling of over 30 units. IMO, a 100% failure rate using exotic plugs in over 30 different Hemi engines is good enough for me. Backing that with the real world results of others like chefred112 is just confirmation that my data is consistent with the results noticed by others.

I would really like to know why this is, but for now, I will do my best to inform as many members as possible of my findings in the hopes that they don't spend a bunch of $ on good intentions and worse yet, a bunch of $ trying to figure out why they have the problems they have.

Information on the science behind these observations would be gratefully accepted, because in my mind.....this simply does NOT make sense! :4-dontknow:
 

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I've know 2 guys locally that did e3's, both were 3rd gens and like said above, they ran great for about a week before odd misfires started to come around. i'm not an engineer and I may not understand as well as you guys exactly what happens...but i like to keep things simple...and the first thing i told these guys to do was reinstall the stock ones that came out...sure enough, problem went away.... now everyone locally here that knows me uses Ngk 4306's or 5306's now...one less thing to worry about, especially when i get asked for help trying to fix any issues locally...
 
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