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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all, just got a new 2019 Ram Laramie and it came with a conventional rear and not the limited slip. Any idea how it will do in the snow? My last ram was a 2010 with limited slip and it pretty much required four wheel drive in any thing more then just a dusting of snow. Thanks for any input.
 

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Not to worry, my 14 Sport doesn't have limited slip but in four wheel auto, with good tires, the traction control does a fine job here in Michigan. Just be sure it's in 4 auto.
 

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I had a 2013 Quad Cab Tradesman without LSD. I was OK with it. Then I got a 15 Crew Cab with the LSD.

I live in MT and they don't "scrape" the roads clean or use salt. They generally leave a couple of inches of snow on the roads and you drive through that. It would be totally unacceptable east of the Mississippi. I like it, but I gotta 4WD truck. Two wheel sedans consider winters an adventure here. That is why the majority of the vehicles are AWD or 4WD. They don't even sell 2WD trucks here except for special order.

For me, the difference was amazing. You can feel it when it kicks in on the snow in particular. My best example where I really noticed it is the slight incline in front of our mailboxes for the neighborhood. That area gets slicked up from everyone stopping. It is a slight incline, but with the old quad cab I would spin and have to make sure I got into something not slicked up. I'd have to back up occasionally and the rear end would slide over until it gripped on something.

With the crew cab (LSD), I just step lightly on the gas and feel it start to go and it starts with spinning wheels and then I feel the LSD kick in and it bites and I'm on my way. I feel it in curves, and as you feel that slight slide, you let off the gas and then hit it and feel it bite, and you feel safer knowing that it is searching for traction instead of just sliding into the corner.

I used to race go carts in high school and was taught and learned that once a rear end starts to slide, and if you just let off the gas and let it, one you just lost the race, second, mass and momentum will have their way and the slide will tend to continue. The key is to know that "feeling" or anticipate it as you enter a corner when the rear end loses bite, and so you just let up just a split second as you hit the turn and then hit the gas hard. You then have control as your increased speed will then "plant" the tires and the force of acceleration causes the vehicle to "set" itself into the corner as you go around increasing speed up to a point. Knowing that point is critical and is a function of "feel" not understanding.

It is a whole different more subtle deal with snow and six thousand lbs of truck but the dynamics are the same if you have a "feel" for the laws of physics and your truck and the surface you are on. A dumb rear end is a big swinging ass simply following the laws of physics. An LSD is less "dumb" as it mechanically recognizes the slip and seeks a different grab point.

Now for the disclaimer. This "thing" ONLY applies to rear wheel drive vehicles. Not everyone is able to internalize this process or connect the "feeling" I am talking about to their ability to react. I was "offered" a ride in sponsored midgets when I graduated from high school (first step to an Indy 500 career) but had signed the papers for the Marine Corps, so a road not taken. Finally, tires are everything in this equation representing the final qualitative element of success or failure. Soft sticky (or with the blizzard symbol for snow) will grip, hard long lasting will send you into the grass or nearest obstacle as a general rule.

LSD is another important qualitative element toward maintaining traction. I frankly wouldn't want it in a race car but I recommend it if you have the opportunity to get it in any other vehicle even after market, some of which are said to be superior to OEM.

Oh, I grew up in Speedway Indiana and many of my friends dads worked crew/mechanicals for the racers. We all raced. Most weekend warrior racers do not understand that "setting" into the corner thing or don't have the "feel" to do it. If you do get it, it is one of the most awesome feelings in the world having other vehicles preferably at your side or in back of you and you enter a corner at speed (50 mph in carts) and set the cart into the corner and stomp on the gas all the way through the corner coming out, flat out. Have you ever seen race cars going back and forth under yellow flags in the straights? The drivers do that to keep their tires hot and sticky because once the green flag comes out and they hit it and they hit that first turn and "set" into it they want those tires to "bite." It is awesome and if you make one slight mistake like overestimating the bite you have, the whole thing just lets go and you fly literally taking everything and everyone around you into, hopefully the grass... I'd probably be dead if I had continued to race.

But I digress.
 

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As long as you have 4wd you should be fine. People seem to be split on whether they prefer LSD or open diffs in the snow
 

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I’ve had both in my trucks and there’s no doubt in my mind that the Anti-Slip is WAY better in the snow. My current truck has a conventional rear differential and I drive a lot in the snow with it, 4 wheel drive overcomes that for sure.

If I can drive in it with a conventional anyone can. If anything it’s the Goodyear tires that come stock that cause the biggest issue, so if your worried get a better set of tires.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hay guys, thanks for all the input. I definitely agree w/chrisze1 , every truck I have ever bought always came with good year tires and they have all sucked! I do believe that a good set of tires will determine how well a conventional rear will perform.
 
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