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Discussion Starter #21
Isn't there two schedules for changing the oil, one for what they call severe service which includes short commutes, towing and dirty dusty conditions among a few other things and then the normal schedule where you have longer trips of 20 miles or more and do not encounter dirty dusty conditions and do not idle the engine for long periods of time. I would follow the manual if you meet the severe conditions then change the oil at that point the manual calls for, if you meet normal conditions then run the full 15,000 miles. If the oil change is the same for severe and normal than follow the manual. Cummins does not want their engines blowing up so there 15,000 miles oil change interval is sound.

Oil today can handle well over 15,000 miles, if you really want to know the condition of your oil send a used oil sample to a company like Blackstone or one of the others. Just remember that they are measuring in parts per million so don't get spooked by readings, every engine wears differently one engine might show more iron wear than another, or one might show more aluminum wear than another.

I run Redline oil because it is a Group V Ester Synthetic 15w-40 oil, were you live you will need to run a 5w-40, if you wanted to run Redline in that weight you would have to use their professional series oil which is a Group III/Group IV PAO blend 5w-40.

I live in Southwest Florida where our winters are mild and a 15w-40 oil works fine for the temperatures we see. If I lived up north I would look for a 5w-40 oil that is a Group IV PAO with Group V Ester blend synthetic or if you can find one a Group V Ester synthetic.

Apparently Normal operating and Severe operating condition call for the same mileage schedules for the 2019 plus 6.7 Cummins, for an oil change it is 15,000 miles for either one. Transmission and differential fluid changes are different schedules for 2019 plus.

Here is a link to that schedule for 2019 plus: 5th Generation 6.7L Cummins Maintenance Guide And Service Schedule
Thanks for this, as I mentioned I am new to the diesel world and have plenty to learn just like I did with any of my other vehicles.

With regards to oil change intervals and best oils to use, my inexperience in diesels or any other engine for that matter, tells me to error on the side of caution and more frequent is best. In this case, the fresh oil (I’ve only done one oil change on the truck) is black almost as soon as I put it in the engine so does it not make sense to change it more often given that the truck sits most of the winter? Come the spring it will be used more for what it was built for, in our case pulling a 43 foot RV, and perhaps oil change intervals can be extend.
 

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All diesels turn the oil black just as soon as they run with new oil, nothing to worry about.
The filtration system is designed to keep harmful debris out, that is why it is imperative to always use the best oil filter you can get.
 

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Discussion Starter #23
Very much appreciate all of the advice from all responders as my inexperience in this field is why I joined this forum!

As technically sophisticated as our trucks are, I do not believe, or I have yet to see, that we are to follow the maintenance minder for oil changes to the letter or am I wrong to assume that? Before the truck I owned an Acura and would be turned away by the dealer if I went in for maintenance before the 15% oil life point. Should I just be following the truck’s ability to advise me when and what maintenance is due?
 

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Discussion Starter #24
Very much appreciate all of the advice from all responders as my inexperience in this field is why I joined this forum!

As technically sophisticated as our trucks are, I do not believe, or I have yet to see, that we are to follow the maintenance minder for oil changes to the letter or am I wrong to assume that? Before the truck I owned an Acura and would be turned away by the dealer if I went in for maintenance before the 15% oil life point. Should I just be following the truck’s ability to advise me when and what maintenance is due?
Perhaps this is better handled in it’s own post as I feel my original topic here has taken a left turn...
 

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Very much appreciate all of the advice from all responders as my inexperience in this field is why I joined this forum!

As technically sophisticated as our trucks are, I do not believe, or I have yet to see, that we are to follow the maintenance minder for oil changes to the letter or am I wrong to assume that? Before the truck I owned an Acura and would be turned away by the dealer if I went in for maintenance before the 15% oil life point. Should I just be following the truck’s ability to advise me when and what maintenance is due?
You just need to follow the schedule in the owner's manual diesel supplement.
There are time and mileage points for maintenance, the oil change and fuel filter change monitors only go by miles and to a certain extent operating conditions, they don't monitor time.
So, if you don't put many miles a year on your truck, you will get to the time point before miles, so you should do the maintenance then.
And, this is particularly important for trucks under warranty so you don't lose that for not maintaining the vehicle properly according to the manufacturer's schedule.
 

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Discussion Starter #26
You just need to follow the schedule in the owner's manual diesel supplement.
There are time and mileage points for maintenance, the oil change and fuel filter change monitors only go by miles and to a certain extent operating conditions, they don't monitor time.
So, if you don't put many miles a year on your truck, you will get to the time point before miles, so you should do the maintenance then.
And, this is particularly important for trucks under warranty so you don't lose that for not maintaining the vehicle properly according to the manufacturer's schedule.
Thanks, great advice!
 

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Ok guys, I’m new to the truck, a 2014 Ram 3500 DRW, which just turned 50k kms, and diesels so please forgive any stupid questions.

I keep the truck on a battery tender as I do not, or try not to, use it as a daily driver during these Canadian cold months.

When I went to start it yesterday, the DEF gauge did not move to full, as usual, even though I just had filled it the weeks before with fresh DEF and all was fine on my last trip. I got the °Fill DEF Soon° message but I could see that the gauge kept creeping up as the truck got warmer until it went to half full. This took a good 5 minutes. Turned the truck off and then on and then all seemed normal. I did not have the engine block heater on for a long enough period, maybe 15 minutes, so not sure if that caused this that has never happened before.

So is this what to expect on cold weather starts or am I seeing the signs of worse things to come with either a bad DEF system or other areas that will need attention? By the way, I normally start the engine then place it on fast idle until oil temp is above 15 degrees celsius (what is that in F?), before driving it.

Thank you for any advice and suggestions.
Just curious... do you notice a Battery Save Mode message when (or just after) doing a cold start?
 

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Discussion Starter #28
Just curious... do you notice a Battery Save Mode message when (or just after) doing a cold start?
No nothing on the center screen for that but I do see other messages that do not last and nothing is stored on the message screen.
 

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Ok guys, I’m new to the truck, a 2014 Ram 3500 DRW, which just turned 50k kms, and diesels so please forgive any stupid questions.

I keep the truck on a battery tender as I do not, or try not to, use it as a daily driver during these Canadian cold months.

When I went to start it yesterday, the DEF gauge did not move to full, as usual, even though I just had filled it the weeks before with fresh DEF and all was fine on my last trip. I got the °Fill DEF Soon° message but I could see that the gauge kept creeping up as the truck got warmer until it went to half full. This took a good 5 minutes. Turned the truck off and then on and then all seemed normal. I did not have the engine block heater on for a long enough period, maybe 15 minutes, so not sure if that caused this that has never happened before.

So is this what to expect on cold weather starts or am I seeing the signs of worse things to come with either a bad DEF system or other areas that will need attention? By the way, I normally start the engine then place it on fast idle until oil temp is above 15 degrees celsius (what is that in F?), before driving it.

Thank you for any advice and suggestions.
15 X 9 divided by 5 plus 32 = 59
 

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The way the DEF tank works on most trucks is the DEF pump runs after the engine is shut down for a few seconds to remove the DEF from the lines and pump it all back into the DEF tank so the heater can do it's job. DEF will gel when it's very cold so the tank has a low amp DEF heater built into the sending unit. The correct engine oil is important when operating in very cold climates. The block heater can help warm the engine coolant and oil, which helps oil flow when the engine is first started. The engine also has an intake air heater that will draw a lot of amps from a battery after the engine is started.
 

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The way the DEF tank works on most trucks is the DEF pump runs after the engine is shut down for a few seconds to remove the DEF from the lines and pump it all back into the DEF tank so the heater can do it's job. DEF will gel when it's very cold so the tank has a low amp DEF heater built into the sending unit. The correct engine oil is important when operating in very cold climates. The block heater can help warm the engine coolant and oil, which helps oil flow when the engine is first started. The engine also has an intake air heater that will draw a lot of amps from a battery after the engine is started.
A few misconceptions about the DEF system there...

DEF doesn't gel, it freezes at -11c.
The heater is part of the pump assembly, heat elements extend from the bottom of the pump, laying in the bottom of the DEF tank. And, the DEF lines are also heated.
Also, the DEF pump only pumps one way, does not pump the DEF in the injector line back into the tank.
 

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Discussion Starter #33
All great information to know what’s going on when I push the start button!

Not sure if I missed it but is frozen DEF and the procedure of the DEF heater doing it’s job whenever it gets at or below -11c, what I should be expecting during these starting conditions? I suspect that the engine block heater has no bearing on the DEF system so even if I keep the block heater plugged in at all times, DEF will still freeze in these temperatures, right?

I also understand that the batteries should not be struggling under these conditions so the fact that they did tells me they are failing to hold a charge since they are kept on a trickle charger at all times due to the truck’s limited use. Kinda like a 5 year old tire ready to blow just because it is out of date.
 

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All great information to know what’s going on when I push the start button!

Not sure if I missed it but is frozen DEF and the procedure of the DEF heater doing it’s job whenever it gets at or below -11c, what I should be expecting during these starting conditions? I suspect that the engine block heater has no bearing on the DEF system so even if I keep the block heater plugged in at all times, DEF will still freeze in these temperatures, right?

I also understand that the batteries should not be struggling under these conditions so the fact that they did tells me they are failing to hold a charge since they are kept on a trickle charger at all times due to the truck’s limited use. Kinda like a 5 year old tire ready to blow just because it is out of date.
The DEF(SCR) system is designed with cold weather in mind, you don't need to do anything to compensate. When you turn the key on in cold weather the DEF heater will start warming it up and the system will compensate until the DEF liquifies.

Get your batteries tested, LOAD TESTED, not just voltage tested. And, the batteries are interconnected in the truck so at least one battery needs to be disconnected before the load test is performed or you will get a false reading.
If one or both batteries test bad, replace both, or else the older battery can kill the new one when it goes bad.
 
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