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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I see everyday lots of questions about wheels and tires showing up, we would be more than happy to help ya'll out we will monitor this thread daily so if you have questions about wheels/tires, what will fit, what won't etc, etc. Feel free to post them up and we will answer as efficiently and quickly as we can :)

Thanks
Jeremiah

p.s. What this thread is NOT is a quote thread, please do not ask for pricing in this thread as that is not this threads intention, if you need a quote please ask in our vendor thread as that is the appropriate location for that, or you can email us.
 

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295-65-20 on a 13' Sport 4x4?

I have the HBS Leveling kit I bought from you a few months ago, really like the sport wheels (20x9) so trying to keep them and just powdercoat them. I am trying to get to around 35" All Terrains if possible but would also like a good stance (I like the tire to stick out just a little past the fender if possible).

Thoughs on the 295/65/20s? or something else? Thanks for your time, and I will shoot you an email if itll workout so I can order.
 

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I'm also interested in the 295/65R20 on the stock rims. Would I be able to fit these with no rubbing with just a leveling kit?

Also, just from reading on here, it seems like most people are against spacers. What are they and what are the disadvantages/why don't people like them?

Thanks!
 

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Typically a 285 is the widest tire you can fit on the stock rims without any rubbing. However some guys have gotten away with up to a 305. The problem is that each truck is built slightly differently so it's hard to fully judge exactly what will fit on each truck.

A 295/65/20 will fit no problem height wise with a leveling kit but you will most likely need 1/4" spacers to clear the width. I understand why people are against larger spacers (such as 1" or greater) but you shouldn't have any problems with 1/4" spacers. There's more than enough stud length to accommodate them.
 

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Typically a 285 is the widest tire you can fit on the stock rims without any rubbing. However some guys have gotten away with up to a 305. The problem is that each truck is built slightly differently so it's hard to fully judge exactly what will fit on each truck.

A 295/65/20 will fit no problem height wise with a leveling kit but you will most likely need 1/4" spacers to clear the width. I understand why people are against larger spacers (such as 1" or greater) but you shouldn't have any problems with 1/4" spacers. There's more than enough stud length to accommodate them.
Thanks Brandon! Where could I get spacers if I need them? And is there any way to measure before ordering the tires to check if I'll need spacers?
 

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There's no real way to measure first to see if you'll need them. What you could do is buy them and then try to mount your wheels and tires without them first and if it works, return the spacers. But you will want to have them on hand in case you do need them.

I know Rough Country makes them as well as a few other companies. You can get them through Bully's Performance or maybe check with your local auto suppliers if you want to get some in person which might make returning them easier if you don't need them.
 

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Does Bully's recommend using spacers?

Why or why not?
 

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Hi,

regarding a 2006-2008 4x4 1500: 17x9 wheels with -12offset and 35x12.50 A/T tires, will they fit with a 2" level?

how much will the stick out of the fenders?
They should fit but it might be a little tight. There's a possibility you'll have to do some trimming/remolding on the inner fender to fully clear them without rubbing.

You'll be sticking out about 2" past the fender with that set up. Checkout some of gonefishin776's pictures. He's running a similar set up on his '07.
 

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Ok I'm gonna be honest, I don't know a single thing about tires/wheels. I have a 2008 Dodge Ram 1500 ST 4X2 V8 4.7L. It has stock 20" rims on it, I love them and I am thinking about keeping them and placing some nice muds on them. What is the tire numbers, I get so thrown off with all the numbers and what they mean.

But then again I really like the look of the XD Rockstar II Rims. With maybe 33" tires or 35" tires. I just don't know what side the tire needs to be if I go with 18" rims. Someone please help me!!!
 

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Ok I'm gonna be honest, I don't know a single thing about tires/wheels. I have a 2008 Dodge Ram 1500 ST 4X2 V8 4.7L. It has stock 20" rims on it, I love them and I am thinking about keeping them and placing some nice muds on them. What is the tire numbers, I get so thrown off with all the numbers and what they mean.

But then again I really like the look of the XD Rockstar II Rims. With maybe 33" tires or 35" tires. I just don't know what side the tire needs to be if I go with 18" rims. Someone please help me!!!
Others on here have way more knowledge than I do, but I'll offer up the little bit that I do have. A lot of the time, tires are sized using metric units (mm). For example: a 295/65R20 is 295 mm wide, the sidewall size is 65% of the width (65% of 295mm = 191.75mm or ~7.54"), and it fits on a 20" rim. You can use this to find the overall height (diameter) of the tire.

With some of the larger sizes, manufacturers seem to use inches. I don't know what all those sizes mean, so someone else with have to chime in.

Hope this little bit makes sense and helps answer your question.
 

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Others on here have way more knowledge than I do, but I'll offer up the little bit that I do have. A lot of the time, tires are sized using metric units (mm). For example: a 295/65R20 is 295 mm wide, the sidewall size is 65% of the width (65% of 295mm = 191.75mm or ~7.54"), and it fits on a 20" rim. You can use this to find the overall height (diameter) of the tire.

With some of the larger sizes, manufacturers seem to use inches. I don't know what all those sizes mean, so someone else with have to chime in.

Hope this little bit makes sense and helps answer your question.
This is some good info ^^

Here's some figures/calculations for a 295/65/20.

The tread width is 295mm (11 5/8")
The aspect ratio (ratio of sidewall to width) is 0.65 or 65%
To find the total height of the tire you would calculate 295x0.65x2(for both sidewalls within the diameter). You will then have the height of the tire in mm. Divide that number by 25.4 (1" = 25.4mm) and you will have the height of the tire in inches. Then simply add the diameter of the rim for the total height of the tire.
So your calculation would look like this ((295x0.65x2)/25.4)+20=35 1/8" So your total tire height will be 35 1/8" tall by 11 5/8" wide.

With the tires that are measured in imperial that work is simply done for you already. Keep in mind, with any tire you are looking at it's a good idea to check out the manufacturers website to see what the actual size of the tire is when mounted. For example: The 35x12.5 Toyo MT's on my 1500 were actually 34.5" tall when mounted and the overall width was 13.4".
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
Does Bully's recommend using spacers?

Why or why not?
We generally do not recommend using spacers over having the proper offset rims, mostly because the cheaper spacers that most want to run instead of getting the proper offset rim are not hub centric spacers so this puts all the weight of the wheel on the studs instead of mostly on the hub. The wheel spacers that we do recommend (if this is the only option for the specific application) is true hub centric wheel spacers, depending on how wide of a spacer you are wanting to run these can range from $85-$200 per spacer, you generally need 4 of them so sometimes it is better to just get new rims and a few times it ha actually been cheaper. If you do go the hubcentric wheel spacer route you will want to make sure you retourque the luf nut holding the spacer onto the factory studs at minimum after 100 miles and 500 miles when you first put them on, and then every couple thousand mile or when you rotate your tires, we have seen a lot of people forget to do this and it will work itself just a little loose and start wearing stuff improperly and prematurely.

With that said we generally do not recommend unless you have no other option or it is just temporary, we would much rather see someone run the proper offset rim to minimize possible issues, minimize the amount of maintenance, while still having the looks they want. The biggest non hub centric wheel spacers we would recommend using is a 1/4" anything over that you really should go hub centric and make sure you check them frequently as stated above for proper torque.

For every one who might be thinking of running a hub centric wheel spacer/adapter we have found the B.O.R.A wheel adapters are very good quality and not as expensive as most however they are still from $85-$200 each before shipping, there are other companies that sell wheel spacers that are pretty much the exact same thing for up to 3 times that amount, I have only seen a few that are less expensive and they are no where near the same quality. We do not sell B.O.R.A wheel spacers or adapters however a quick google search and you can find them, when we run spacers on our own vehicles (temporarily while waiting on rims) we never even think about using anyone else and it is never a permanent solution either.

Here are a couple pics of what a proper wheel spacer/adapter look like for reference for anyone looking into this as a solution.

Thanks
Jeremiah




 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I have the HBS Leveling kit I bought from you a few months ago, really like the sport wheels (20x9) so trying to keep them and just powdercoat them. I am trying to get to around 35" All Terrains if possible but would also like a good stance (I like the tire to stick out just a little past the fender if possible).

Thoughs on the 295/65/20s? or something else? Thanks for your time, and I will shoot you an email if itll workout so I can order.
I'm also interested in the 295/65R20 on the stock rims. Would I be able to fit these with no rubbing with just a leveling kit?

Also, just from reading on here, it seems like most people are against spacers. What are they and what are the disadvantages/why don't people like them?

Thanks!
as brandon stated generally 285 is the most however some do run bigger than that, most I have seen end up using some kind of a wheel spacer to prevent rubbing, as I stated above if you only need 1/4" then you do not need to go hubcentric, if you end up needing more than that then you will want to get a hubcentric wheel spacer if you do not want to get new rims. (the proper offset rim is almost always better than using a wheel spacer, however with proper care, and the proper wheel spacer you should be just fine) to run a 295 you will likely need at minimum 1/4" wheel spacer, there are many on the market rough country seems to have a very popular 1/4" wheel spacer that I have seen many run with no problems at all.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Hi,

regarding a 2006-2008 4x4 1500: 17x9 wheels with -12offset and 35x12.50 A/T tires, will they fit with a 2" level?

how much will the stick out of the fenders?
As brandon stated should be fine, might require some minor trimming though to prevent rubbing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Others on here have way more knowledge than I do, but I'll offer up the little bit that I do have. A lot of the time, tires are sized using metric units (mm). For example: a 295/65R20 is 295 mm wide, the sidewall size is 65% of the width (65% of 295mm = 191.75mm or ~7.54"), and it fits on a 20" rim. You can use this to find the overall height (diameter) of the tire.

With some of the larger sizes, manufacturers seem to use inches. I don't know what all those sizes mean, so someone else with have to chime in.

Hope this little bit makes sense and helps answer your question.
This is some good info ^^

Here's some figures/calculations for a 295/65/20.

The tread width is 295mm (11 5/8")
The aspect ratio (ratio of sidewall to width) is 0.65 or 65%
To find the total height of the tire you would calculate 295x0.65x2(for both sidewalls within the diameter). You will then have the height of the tire in mm. Divide that number by 25.4 (1" = 25.4mm) and you will have the height of the tire in inches. Then simply add the diameter of the rim for the total height of the tire.
So your calculation would look like this ((295x0.65x2)/25.4)+20=35 1/8" So your total tire height will be 35 1/8" tall by 11 5/8" wide.

With the tires that are measured in imperial that work is simply done for you already. Keep in mind, with any tire you are looking at it's a good idea to check out the manufacturers website to see what the actual size of the tire is when mounted. For example: The 35x12.5 Toyo MT's on my 1500 were actually 34.5" tall when mounted and the overall width was 13.4".
very good info here ^^^
 

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We generally do not recommend using spacers over having the proper offset rims, mostly because the cheaper spacers that most want to run instead of getting the proper offset rim are not hub centric spacers so this puts all the weight of the wheel on the studs instead of mostly on the hub. The wheel spacers that we do recommend (if this is the only option for the specific application) is true hub centric wheel spacers, depending on how wide of a spacer you are wanting to run these can range from $85-$200 per spacer, you generally need 4 of them so sometimes it is better to just get new rims and a few times it ha actually been cheaper. If you do go the hubcentric wheel spacer route you will want to make sure you retourque the luf nut holding the spacer onto the factory studs at minimum after 100 miles and 500 miles when you first put them on, and then every couple thousand mile or when you rotate your tires, we have seen a lot of people forget to do this and it will work itself just a little loose and start wearing stuff improperly and prematurely.

With that said we generally do not recommend unless you have no other option or it is just temporary, we would much rather see someone run the proper offset rim to minimize possible issues, minimize the amount of maintenance, while still having the looks they want. The biggest non hub centric wheel spacers we would recommend using is a 1/4" anything over that you really should go hub centric and make sure you check them frequently as stated above for proper torque.

For every one who might be thinking of running a hub centric wheel spacer/adapter we have found the B.O.R.A wheel adapters are very good quality and not as expensive as most however they are still from $85-$200 each before shipping, there are other companies that sell wheel spacers that are pretty much the exact same thing for up to 3 times that amount, I have only seen a few that are less expensive and they are no where near the same quality. We do not sell B.O.R.A wheel spacers or adapters however a quick google search and you can find them, when we run spacers on our own vehicles (temporarily while waiting on rims) we never even think about using anyone else and it is never a permanent solution either.

Here are a couple pics of what a proper wheel spacer/adapter look like for reference for anyone looking into this as a solution.

Thanks
Jeremiah




Great detailed reply.

I agree!

Points when I can.
 
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OK here goes...

I have a 2009 4x4 CC Hemi w/ 3.55 gears on the stock 20x9's with 275/60/20 rubber.
I have the Bilsteins in front set at 2.1 and Bilstein rears with a .75 inch coil spacer.
I want to run 35 inch tires on either a 17 or 18 inch wheel. Most of the wheels I have looked at are either 0 offset or -6 to -12 offset. I know the stockers are +19 roughly so I think that the 0 offsets will give me the clearance I need. I will likely be adding the RCX 1.25 body lift in the near future so that will help as well.

So how will I do with an 18x9 0 offset wheel and 35x12.50 mud terrains?
 
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