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Is anyone running 295 70 17 on after market rims? Was looking to lose my 20's and drop to 17's. If you have similar set up post pic
 

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No, I don't, Rah. I only had them on for a week before I put my OEM rims with my GY Silent Armors back on for the winter. I'm running the black aftermarket with the Duratracs as my sping/summer/fall tires. :) Do not want the salt to ruin my aftermarkets.
 

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I had the same idea when I had my 1500. Ended up dropping to 18s instead, mostly because I was able to find the combo I wanted in 18s and was having difficulty finding 17s with the proper offsets and finding the tires I wanted, etc. A lot of guys gave some very helpful advice in my thread and there are pics of the setup I ended up going with on pages 2&3.

http://www.ramforumz.com/showthread.php?t=156850
 

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I looking to do the same to my truck. I believe that some of the newer Laramie's came with nice looking 17's that's what i'm leaning towards to keep the stock look.
 

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Is anyone running 295 70 17 on after market rims? Was looking to lose my 20's and drop to 17's. If you have similar set up post pic
I ditched the 20's before I even left the dealer, 20's don't belong on a truck IMO








LT285/70/17 Load D
 

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Does this hurt gas mileage at all? I was looking at some 18s as well but didn't want to kill my mileage....
The things that hurt mileage when going with new wheels and tires are weight, diameter, and width; these must be measured by the wheel/tire assembly though for it to matter. For example, if you go from 20" wheels to 17" wheels but the tires on the 17s have a taller sidewall that makes the overall diameter the same, then all else being equal your mileage won't change.

Think about it: If you increase the diameter you will lose mileage because this typically increases weight and the truck is at a relative mechanical disadvantage to turn them compared to the original size tires.

Weight increases rotational mass which also makes it more difficult to get the wheels turning.

Wider tires have a greater contact patch and consequently increased rolling resistance.
 

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The things that hurt mileage when going with new wheels and tires are weight, diameter, and width....
Shack.

The same debate about 15s vs 17s took place a decade ago, and the same logic about diameter, width, and weight were true then too. Now it's 17s vs 20s. Most are pretty decent compared to some of the old cruddy retreads we drove long ago.

In a year or two the number of 20 inch options may be as broad as current 17 inch options. I'll use the imperfect stock tires and wear them down a bit for now and see what happens.
 

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Shack.

The same debate about 15s vs 17s took place a decade ago, and the same logic about diameter, width, and weight were true then too. Now it's 17s vs 20s. Most are pretty decent compared to some of the old cruddy retreads we drove long ago.

In a year or two the number of 20 inch options may be as broad as current 17 inch options. I'll use the imperfect stock tires and wear them down a bit for now and see what happens.

Shack?
 

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