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I've recently got home from a family visit and the RAM isn't running the way it should. Not bad but just doesn't seem right..... Kind of hesitates on acceleration. I,m wondering if the gas I got in PEI is the problem, it was an ethanal blend. Something like 10% ethanol. I see in the manual that ethanol isn't recommended for the HEMI so will I be forced into buying "premium" fuel when I travel? Any thoughts.:smiledown:
 

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I have no choice but to run ethanol mix due to where I live. The hemi engine runs fine on it.

Edit: Please note that ethanol mix is NOT E85. E85 will overheat your engine and melt gaskets and other things that your engine needs in order to run.
 

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I've recently got home from a family visit and the RAM isn't running the way it should. Not bad but just doesn't seem right..... Kind of hesitates on acceleration. I,m wondering if the gas I got in PEI is the problem, it was an ethanal blend. Something like 10% ethanol. I see in the manual that ethanol isn't recommended for the HEMI so will I be forced into buying "premium" fuel when I travel? Any thoughts.:smiledown:
most gas stations sell gas with an ethonal mix of up to 10%. I'd try a different station and see if the problem persits.

I have no choice but to run ethanol mix due to where I live. The hemi engine runs fine on it.

Edit: Please note that ethanol mix is NOT E85. E85 will overheat your engine and melt gaskets and other things that your engine needs in order to run.
that's interesting because everything that I've ever read about E85 only has to do with the fuel system components (pumps, lines, injectors, etc) being different. the reason is that E85 is more corrosive and will deteriorate normal rubber gaskets and the like. E85 also requires higher volume pumps and injectors. never have I seen a case where engine gaskets were melted or overheated.
 

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that's interesting because everything that I've ever read about E85 only has to do with the fuel system components (pumps, lines, injectors, etc) being different. the reason is that E85 is more corrosive and will deteriorate normal rubber gaskets and the like. E85 also requires higher volume pumps and injectors. never have I seen a case where engine gaskets were melted or overheated.
E85 is the equivalent of 100+ octane and will make your engine temps skyrocket as well as corroding things. All in all, if you don't have the "flex-fuel" or "corn burner" stickers on your rig, don't run it.....
 

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there are plenty of cars that have been converted to E85 (fuel system changed) and have not melted down.

you really should do your homework. E85 burns cooler. Heat has to do with BTUs not octance. Octance is a fuels resistance to knock. Here are some quick copy and pastes from a google search.

"Ethanol's lower energy content (76,100 BTUs/Gal.) is a big contributor to its reduced fuel economy compared to gasoline (114,100 BTUs/Gal)."

"Using E85 in a gasoline engine has the drawback of achieving lower fuel economy, as more fuel is needed per unit air (stoichiometric ratio) to run the engine in comparison with gasoline. This corresponds to a lower heating value (units of energy per unit mass) for E85 than for gasoline."

"Ethanol has a lower ignition point than gas. It burns cooler and will extend engine life by preventing the burning of engine valves and prevent the build-up of olefins in fuel injectors, keeping the fuel system cleaner."

How Ethanol Works
"Ethanol helps keep engines clean, too. It burns more completely and at a slightly cooler temperature than gasoline. This means longer spark plug life and fewer combustion
deposits. Ethanol burns well because it is an oxygenate, meaning that ethanol molecules contain oxygen."
 

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My original post was an attempt at humor and summarized things I had heard/experienced. I did more research tonight and here is what I found. The best link I found that explains about E85 is below. There are many sites out there that have information but this was one I found that wasn't related to a company/organization that is pushing gasoline or ethanol. http://www.ehow.com/how-does_5382110_ethanol-flex-fuel-works.html

This link states that E85 has an octane rate of 105: http://www.ehow.com/facts_7342503_e85-octane-fuel_.html

E85 requires more fuel and your normal injectors+fuel map won't put enough in to keep the engine cool (it runs lean). This is probably why my friend melted his head gaskets when he tried running it in his truck (he was trying to mix it at the pump with gasoline and E85). Running lean is what caused the extra heat. It took about 2-3 tanks of doing this before his check engine light came on to warn him the damage was already done.

Engines that run pure E85 have to have special fuel maps (to use more fuel), bigger injectors (to deliver more fuel) and different guts (gaskets, fuel lines, etc) to deal with the difference between E85 and gasoline.

It is completely possible to convert an engine to run E85 (tuners, car makers do it all the time) and I never said it wasn't. What I said was don't run E85 in your vehicle if it isn't made for it.


To the OP: I've had similar issues when filling up. It sounds like you just got a bad batch of gas and I would only worry about it if the trend continues in later fill ups.


Hope that helps
 

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You have to really hunt around in my area for a station with 100% gasoline. There are a few, but most of the majors (Shell, Conoco) only carry the 10% ethanol blended fuel.

I've been using nothing but 89 octane from my local 7-11 convenience store with good results. The only stumbling/stuttering issues I notice are caused by the MDS on the Hemi, not by the fuel I'm using.

Darin
 

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U probly have "bad" gas or water in the gas. Try some dry gas and run it. My opinion... the only thing ethanal should be made for is sippin'!!!!:doh:
agree with sipping part of your post, but i have not used dry gas in many years, are there new "dry gases" out there to prevent damage to seals and rubber or do we have to use a specific type? tks
 

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My original post was an attempt at humor and summarized things I had heard/experienced. I did more research tonight and here is what I found. The best link I found that explains about E85 is below. There are many sites out there that have information but this was one I found that wasn't related to a company/organization that is pushing gasoline or ethanol. http://www.ehow.com/how-does_5382110_ethanol-flex-fuel-works.html

This link states that E85 has an octane rate of 105: http://www.ehow.com/facts_7342503_e85-octane-fuel_.html

E85 requires more fuel and your normal injectors+fuel map won't put enough in to keep the engine cool (it runs lean). This is probably why my friend melted his head gaskets when he tried running it in his truck (he was trying to mix it at the pump with gasoline and E85). Running lean is what caused the extra heat. It took about 2-3 tanks of doing this before his check engine light came on to warn him the damage was already done.

Engines that run pure E85 have to have special fuel maps (to use more fuel), bigger injectors (to deliver more fuel) and different guts (gaskets, fuel lines, etc) to deal with the difference between E85 and gasoline.

It is completely possible to convert an engine to run E85 (tuners, car makers do it all the time) and I never said it wasn't. What I said was don't run E85 in your vehicle if it isn't made for it.


To the OP: I've had similar issues when filling up. It sounds like you just got a bad batch of gas and I would only worry about it if the trend continues in later fill ups.


Hope that helps
CAUTION.....HIJACK! with all those changes how does the flex fuel engine burn regular gas and get decent mpg with all the changes, ie bigger injectors? not being a smart ass here, just wondering. tks
 

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CAUTION.....HIJACK! with all those changes how does the flex fuel engine burn regular gas and get decent mpg with all the changes, ie bigger injectors? not being a smart ass here, just wondering. tks
Sorry I don't know how factory vehicles can switch back and forth b/t E85 and gas. He is right in that E85 requires about 30% more fuel plus or minus. It requires bigger injectors, bigger lines and stronger or multiple fuel pumps on the high hp applications. The E85 guys that I've talked to don't use both just E85. The higher octance rating allows them to increae the timing and E85's natural cooling helps keep the temps down from all the boost they are running. These guys are all making 600-700+rwhp. I know it's a Ford mag but the newest issue of Muscle Mustangs & Fast Fords has a great article on switching to E85. Their test car picked up 50 rwhp after the new tune was written.
 

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CAUTION.....HIJACK! with all those changes how does the flex fuel engine burn regular gas and get decent mpg with all the changes, ie bigger injectors? not being a smart ass here, just wondering. tks
The computer in flex fuel vehicles are supposed to have a way to figure out the "mix" between gas and E85 and adjust the fuel mapping/timing (and probably other things) accordingly.

To answer why the flex fuel vehicles work for both while non-flex fuel vehicles don't then think of it this way. It's possible to program a big injector to reduce output to less than 100% while it is impossible for a small injector to output more than 100%. This is a big reason as to why flex fuel cars (big injectors by default) can adapt to gasoline and non-flex fuel vehicles (smaller injectors by default) cannot adapt to E85 (without major reworking of their parts). As stated, E85 needs more fuel in order to not run lean.


Hope that helps
 
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