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My 2019 Ram 5.8L Hemi went in for an oil change, and the dealer strongly recommended a fuel injection cleaning service for $149.99. Obviously that seems really high for that, and I have no signs of needing one. Mileage is almost 20k. They then sent me an email once again recommending it, as shown below.

I know there are gas additives that claim to do the same thing, but I haven't used any.

What are the rest of you doing for this? What works well? What doesn't?

Screen Shot 2020-05-08 at 6.48.46 AM.png


Thanks!
 

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Not needed. Certainly not at 20k miles. I use a bottle to Techron once a year or Redline fuel system cleaner just as a preventative thing.
 

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Symptoms of clogged injectors

Symptoms of dirty fuel injectors may include:

  • hard starting
  • rough idle
  • throttle “tip-in” hesitation
  • pre-ignition (sometimes heard as that ‘pinging sound’)
  • poor overall performance
  • decreased gas mileage
We recommend cleaning fuel injectors at least every 36 months or 45,000 miles.
The only do-it-yourself fuel system cleaner that works and won’t damage your car is Techron from Chevron For real benefit, Techron must be used at least every 4,000 miles or so
Info from Tom Dwyer
So with this info, You decide.
 

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Or use top tier gas and not really worry about it ever.
For the most part it is an upsell service that very few people ever notice a difference after - other than a lighter wallet.
There are several that are as good and even better than Techron - but it is easily available.
 

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Yep just an upsell service. I use Lucus fuel system treatment in my truck every couple of months. I just used it in my zero turn mower because it would not idle correctly and it cleaned out the carb and now runs fine.
 

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I wont go so far as to say unnecessary just not needed at your current milage. Sea Foam works well also. You may want to disconnect the air hose at TB and take a peak in side there. If its carbonded up a can of throttle body cleaner and a old tooth brush work pretty well. Another trick to help out cleaning intake is pull the brake booster vaccum hose, have your can of sea foam or techron whatever your weapon of choice is. Block so no leak start truck let idle and then quickly put hose in can and let it suck the fluid in. None of this is actually running thru the injectors.
 

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First, find a new dealer to do your servicing, if that dealer is trying to sell you a bogus recommendation then that dealer is completely untrustworthy. Research Fuel Injection Cleaners, easily done, and draw your own conclusions as to which are more "reputable" than others.
 

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I have a 2005 1500 5.7 with 106,000 miles. have never cleaned the injectors. The truck runs great and get the same mileage as when new. I’ve always used shell fuel.
 

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Suggestion: In any case, try and find 100% gasoline (no alcohol added) and you should never need injector cleaning. Ethanol is bad for engines not designed to burn the pure stuff. Add it to gasoline and it doesn't burn completely. If you ride a motorcycle like I do, I can easily smell the cars' exhaust with ethanol in it. My late uncle was always finding garage sale weed whackers and lawnmowers that had gasohol used in them. They had scored pistons and sometime holes in the tops of the piston. Why risk a $6400 crate Hemi for 30-40 cents a gallon? That's the current price in the big blue plastic box. Just needs A/C, starter, power steering pump and hoses/electrical connected.
 

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I would steer clear of a dealer trying to scam you like he is. I have a 2014 Challenger with 5.7 Hemi, 2014 SRT Charger with 6.4 hemi, 2019 Ram with 5.7 Hemi, and my work car is a 2018 Charger with 5.7 Hemi. I put 1 can of Gumout multi system cleaner in the white can (same can as Sea Foam) a year in the gas tank. It works really well. It has also cured the “HEMI tick” in all my vehicles. It seems to quiet the tick where as Sea Foam never did.
 

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My 2019 Ram 5.8L Hemi went in for an oil change, and the dealer strongly recommended a fuel injection cleaning service for $149.99. Obviously that seems really high for that, and I have no signs of needing one. Mileage is almost 20k. They then sent me an email once again recommending it, as shown below.

I know there are gas additives that claim to do the same thing, but I haven't used any.

What are the rest of you doing for this? What works well? What doesn't?

View attachment 132488

Thanks!
My 2019 Ram 5.8L Hemi went in for an oil change, and the dealer strongly recommended a fuel injection cleaning service for $149.99. Obviously that seems really high for that, and I have no signs of needing one. Mileage is almost 20k. They then sent me an email once again recommending it, as shown below.

I know there are gas additives that claim to do the same thing, but I haven't used any.

What are the rest of you doing for this? What works well? What doesn't?

View attachment 132488

Thanks!
Sounds fishy,I just changed my injectors at 5k but they looked fine,just needed larger ones
My 2019 Ram 5.8L Hemi went in for an oil change, and the dealer strongly recommended a fuel injection cleaning service for $149.99. Obviously that seems really high for that, and I have no signs of needing one. Mileage is almost 20k. They then sent me an email once again recommending it, as shown below.

I know there are gas additives that claim to do the same thing, but I haven't used any.

What are the rest of you doing for this? What works well? What doesn't?

View attachment 132488

Thanks!
My 2019 Ram 5.8L Hemi went in for an oil change, and the dealer strongly recommended a fuel injection cleaning service for $149.99. Obviously that seems really high for that, and I have no signs of needing one. Mileage is almost 20k. They then sent me an email once again recommending it, as shown below.

I know there are gas additives that claim to do the same thing, but I haven't used any.

What are the rest of you doing for this? What works well? What doesn't?

View attachment 132488

Thanks!
Sounds fishy I just removed mine at 5 k for larger ones procharger supplied.They
looked fine,don’t let that dealer anywhere near your vehicle,granted new ones cost around $65ea 20 k mi.is ridiculous unless the gas is 10 yrs old. Sea foam it.
 

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As you can tell, everyone has one that they like. On all of our vehicles (except my 6.7). I put a pint of Marvel Mystery Oil in the fuel tank when I change the oil. Works great for me and is inexpensive. I have been doing that for more years than I can remember and never had any problems.
 

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Unless you can stand the fumes of going catless,a lot of these fuel system cleaners will mess up sensors. If I was sure of the injectors needing cleaning I would do them individually. I think that’s easier then the 16 spark plug change.
 

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Suggestion: In any case, try and find 100% gasoline (no alcohol added) and you should never need injector cleaning. Ethanol is bad for engines not designed to burn the pure stuff. Add it to gasoline and it doesn't burn completely. If you ride a motorcycle like I do, I can easily smell the cars' exhaust with ethanol in it. My late uncle was always finding garage sale weed whackers and lawnmowers that had gasohol used in them. They had scored pistons and sometime holes in the tops of the piston. Why risk a $6400 crate Hemi for 30-40 cents a gallon? That's the current price in the big blue plastic box. Just needs A/C, starter, power steering pump and hoses/electrical connected.
What are you talking about? What just needs: (A/C, starter, power steering pump and hoses/electrical connected.)
What’s a big blue plastic box?
 

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A new Hemi engine in the plastic shipping crate. The complete engines have jumped in price again. I saw one at the dealership parts department and asked about it. I think that includes the little pre-cats. I think somebody did a bad no-no.
 

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If for no other reason than to muddy the waters even further, here I go:

1. I don't know...

2. I had a buddy was a professional diesel mechanic for a municipal bus service and a Caterpillar dealer in is previous life. He had an LLC side-hustle fixing regular cars. So i think he's pretty qualified, but possibly his "conventional wisdoms" might be out of date as things do change incrementally in an industry. For example, "warming up the car" was a real thing and today they say that isn't a thing anymore.
To the point: my buddy claimed you never ever needed to add anything (along the lines of what we're talking about) to your gas tank, ever. He said the gasoline is made well enough as it is. He said the law of unintended consequenes applies - you might be doing good for water in the line, or injection tips, but you might be corroding another part or weakening seals somewhere.

3. On my own volition - before I met my buddy - I would put in some kind of "gas treatment" or "injector cleaner" or whatnot at least every month, and as my vehicles got older sometimes every other fill up. (I used to run the vehcles to near empty as a practice).
My buddy told me i was killing my fuel system. I had a 14-y.o. ram 1500 hemi 5.7 with 250,000 miles, and it needed two fuel pump replacements in its lifetime; the first replacement wasn't needed until about 11 or 12 years in but the second replacement came within a couple/three years after that.

My buddy told me that the multiple fuel pump failures were due to either - I used too much of those treatments too often, or I ran the tank down to empty too often (the fuel punps in the ram use the fuel in the tank as a coolant and lubrication for its pump. Running a truck to low fuel exposes a lot of the pump motor to air which doesn't cool as well.)

I have had other mechanical folk tell me it was because i kept using cheap gas at the PX on base for my 20-year military career. I've had others tell me it was 14 yo and a quarter million miles, the parts are just plain old, nothing i did shortened its lifespan. Still others claim that the first replacement died too soon becuase it was cheap china [email protected] from Autozone or O'Reilly or whatever strip mall I bought the parts from. ( i did the work by myself).


Me thinks you'd get a more direct answer if you go to the oil thread and ask "what oil is best?" or "5w20 or 5w30?"

Fuel and oil questions about the Rams.... It's like asking horse people for horse behavior advice - if you want three opinions on what's going on, ask two people.
 

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The same exact advice I have got for the last 10+ yrs.from my friend who has a corvette shop and who allowed me to help on the ram procharger install,and never has given me bad advice.Truth is where you fill up matters.
 

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1st I will state I am not a mechanic, however I do have 1st hand experience working on my own cars, specifically issues with drive by wire TBs like we have, as well as disassembling intake on a GMC 4.3L as part of the intake gasket replacement. Rebuilding of 2.8L in S10 Blazer and cleaning valves due to coking / carbon build up. With that I base my statements below:
1. Intake cleaning is needed periodically...... A cleaning service at 20K not really, but tank additives would not hurt and would be helpful for the long term.
2. Tank additives may not stop, but will assist in decreasing the speed at which build up takes place in the lower section of the intake where coking and carbon buildups are most likely to take place due to heat from cylinders. The more often the slower it happens.
3. Regardless of fuel used, carbon and "sludge" buildup in the intake will take place due to the fact that our PVC system directs gases and oil particles back in to the intake manifold for burn off. This can be minimized thru the use of catch cans, but will continue at some level regardless.
This sludge (oil particles, gases) will collect in the intake, and stick to injectors, intake walls and runners as well as on the back of the valves. The back of the valves it will be cooked in to a dry, hard "carbon" deposit that becomes rock solid over time with the heat from the cylinder. The injector location with respect to the valve will also be susceptible to this at a lessor rate. Throughout the intake manifold as well as behind the butterfly on the TB (throttle Body) you will find a semi dry sludge adhered to everything. The fact that we have drive by wire, our throttle body butterflies can be affected by this build up resulting driveability issues or actual loss of throttle.

Now what to do and what can be done:
Carbon build up on valve stem: Not much as any work would require head removal and valves removed and cleaned. But regular use of additives can help decrease the build up, and upper intake cleaning systems such as Seafoam can help decrease some of the build up.
Injectors are similar to valves, except easier to remove, and much more responsive to additives and cleaning systems.
Semi-Dry sludge build up on upper intake and back side of TB; additives and fuel do not get to this area as injection is done closer to valve. However, cleaning systems can assist in decreasing the amount of build up. The good news is that most cars today the intake is a 2 piece and has a reusable gasket, and therefore can usually be disassembled for a through and complete cleaning. In addition the TB can easily be removed and manually clean. However, these are usually only done by most of us when there is other work that requires the intake to be removed, or a throttle body issue. I am not aware of any mechanic that would offer to remove the intake and TB for a manual clean as it is really not needed, with the exception of the TB for a problem with the butterfly sticking due to build up.

Again, many will disagree with me. By no means do I believe that I know everything with respect to this aspect of the induction system. My opinion comes strictly from a been there and done that experiences on different vehicles of different ages. The only changes that have taking place over the years with respect to naturally aspirated induction is the point in which fuel is added to the air flow. Old carbureted engines had fuel introduced at the "start" of the airflow with respect to the internal part of the engine, TBI basically was the same with respect to fuel being introduced to the airflow and allowed the intake to be "washed" with fuel from top to bottom. Tune port injection / fuel injection moved the fuel introduction down to the intake runner, and therefore left the butterfly and upper intake dry with respect to being "washed" by fuel. Direct injection takes the fuel introduction in to the cylinder itself just prior to combustion, resulting in the least amount of "washing / cleaning" of the induction system with fuel and or fuel additives. In short GDI will require regular intake cleaning systems to be used, and will result in fuel system additives being obsoleted, as combustion tends to a very good job of removing deposits from with in the cylinder and burning or blowing them down the exhaust.

My 2 cents, regular fuel injection systems (i.e. non-GDI) should have a bottle of additive added to fuel every 10 - 12K miles when new, and more often with high mileage as the oil particles and materials that cause deposits increase with age and mileage. Induction cleaning systems should most likely be done every 40 to 50K miles, and more often with high mileage (high mileage depends on build, 2005-ish and older year 100 - 110K miles 2010 and newer 130 - 150k miles). Those that install catch cans most likely could double most of the treatment cycles I suggest. But as I do not have direct experience with catch cans I cannot say. I do know they will substantially decrease the amount of oil particles being introduced into the induction system thru the PCV system.
 

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Soon all we’ll be discussing will be direct injection since it has proven so far as being far superior when GMs 3.6 indirect injection gets 263/253 17 mpg and the same 3.6 with the optional direct injection on 87oct.gets 304/274 18 mpg.. Soon very soon.
 
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