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EV 1/2 ton pickups are almost here. Would you consider an electric pickup if it fit your needs?

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The Ford F-150 Lightning EV pickup arrives in one year with impressive specs and aggressive pricing. There's a lot of discussion on the relative merits of gas vs EV, with a strong concern over long trips and towing. Fact is most owners seldom take extended trips, with towing limited and confined to lighter trailers.

RAM has promised an EV pickup; not much is known yet. Agree or not as to whether 1500-segment EVs can compete with gas/Diesel, we're about to find out. EVs are rapidly expanding into all segments, and the 1500s are in the pipeline. They're not aimed at the drivers that require 35 gal tanks and 5th-wheel towing capacity. These EV pickups will appeal to many that use a pickup locally and only drive within the ranges from home.

I'm looking forward to RAM being competitive on specs and pricing. Here's the bar:
  • Five-passenger SuperCrew cab with a 5.5-foot bed. Same dimensions as its conventional counterpart. Common accessories and equipment will work and fit just the same.
  • Maximum payload of 2,000 pounds, of which 400 pounds can go in the frunk where the engine used to be.
  • Maximum tow up to 10,000 pounds.
  • With extended battery: 563 horsepower, 775 lb-ft of torque, and a driving range of about 300 miles on a single charge.
  • With standard battery: 426 hp, 775 lb-ft, and a range of about 230 miles.
  • Front and rear motors provide standard all-wheel drive, and skidplates protect the underbody while off-roading.
  • It retains the full-size spare tire in the back.
2022 F-150 Lightning First Look
 

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I would suspect that the range when towing would drop quite a bit just like with an ICE.
 
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I’ll leave this here, add in subfreezing temps and you’d have to haul a generator around to even get out of your own driveway. $40-90,000 depending on package, yeah sure Ford. 👌

 

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Electric motor vehicle power numbers are always impressive, but you need to remember that an electric motor produces maximum torque right a way, it does not have to build torque like a gas or Diesel engine does. The more load you put on an electric motor the more energy it uses, wait until you get to that long hill. Further how long is it going to take to charge that electric motors battery pack and where are the charging stations going to be?

I can fill up my Diesel in 10 minutes and be back on the road again, will I have to go out of my way to even find a charging station and then will I have to sit there for the next several hours waiting for it to recharge? I know they claim a Tesla will fast charge to 80% in about 30 to 45 minutes but damn that is a long time to wait for a partial charge with less range now.

A range of 300 miles on a 100% charge is reduced to only 240 miles on an 80% charge.

If you only have the standard battery pack that gives you a 230 mile range an 80% charge reduces your range down to only 184 miles.

Sorry but they can keep all their electric vehicles.
 

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Even if just five percent of the vehicles were electric I doubt the power grid could handle the extra load of the chargers , 32 amps @ 240 volts is a LOT of power ! California already has brownouts , how would they handle the load when everybody gets home from work and plugs in ?
 

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For what we use our RAM for— mostly extended camping trips pretty close to fully laden—no electric truck anywhere on the horizon would really work, so I don't forsee getting an electric version of a 3500 in my lifetime.

That said, when it comes time to retire our Subaru Outback in a few years, I can easily see us seriously considering an electric vehicle.
Pretty close to 100% of the round-trips in that vehicle are well within the driving range of current electric options. I doubt we'd choose a pickup as a Subaru replacement though.
I see more and more charging stations popping up all around too, even in smallish towns out here Colorado.

But if they really catch on, and they will, we're going to have to spend a crapton of money on upgrading electric grid infrastructure as well as roads and bridges.
Well, we have to spend that money to take our infrastructure into the 21st century anyway, 'cos so much of it is already past its service life— bridges, roads, fresh water distribution, sewage systems, electric grid, rail transport, you name it and it's all in such bad shape that if we don't upgrade, fast, we're gonna be left in the dust internationally.
 

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Wonder how this rig or any EV will work during a Minnesota winter?
I live in the Colorado mountains and we get plenty of winter.
My neighbor has a Tesla which seems to hold up just fine. He commutes two or three times a month to Denver (about 175 miles one way) as well as using it for local grocery runs etc (60 mile round trips).
He leaves it plugged in when at home, which keeps the charge topped off. He makes it over to Denver easily on a single charge then plugs in to a charging station which tops it off in less than 20 minutes for just a few bucks while he gets lunch. Then he comes back home.
Below zero temps in the early morning are not uncommon. Doesn't seem to be a problem.

I think for local use, with occasional longer trips of less than 300 miles, electric vehicles are going to be a hot item going forward regardless of where you live, providing there's adequate build-out of recharging infrastructure.

I can even see a market for electric LD trucks for tradespeople in urban settings (carpenters, plumbers, electricians etc) who need to haul tools and sometimes supplies regularly, but mostly run short trips in stop and go city traffic.
I used to do restoration work on Victorian houses years ago, and a half-ton pickup with toolboxes and a roof rack was just the ticket.
Most days my travel distance was less than 50 miles, sometime a lot less. An electric LD truck would have handled that no problem.
 

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And not to mention all these electric vehicles putting a load on the power grid, what are they going to do with all the batteries when it's time to dispose of them???
 

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The Ford F-150 Lightning EV pickup arrives in one year with impressive specs and aggressive pricing. There's a lot of discussion on the relative merits of gas vs EV, with a strong concern over long trips and towing. Fact is most owners seldom take extended trips, with towing limited and confined to lighter trailers.

RAM has promised an EV pickup; not much is known yet. Agree or not as to whether 1500-segment EVs can compete with gas/Diesel, we're about to find out. EVs are rapidly expanding into all segments, and the 1500s are in the pipeline. They're not aimed at the drivers that require 35 gal tanks and 5th-wheel towing capacity. These EV pickups will appeal to many that use a pickup locally and only drive within the ranges from home.

I'm looking forward to RAM being competitive on specs and pricing. Here's the bar:
  • Five-passenger SuperCrew cab with a 5.5-foot bed. Same dimensions as its conventional counterpart. Common accessories and equipment will work and fit just the same.
  • Maximum payload of 2,000 pounds, of which 400 pounds can go in the frunk where the engine used to be.
  • Maximum tow up to 10,000 pounds.
  • With extended battery: 563 horsepower, 775 lb-ft of torque, and a driving range of about 300 miles on a single charge.
  • With standard battery: 426 hp, 775 lb-ft, and a range of about 230 miles.
  • Front and rear motors provide standard all-wheel drive, and skidplates protect the underbody while off-roading.
  • It retains the full-size spare tire in the back.
2022 F-150 Lightning First Look
Ev's in the truck segment are green points producers. Companies like fca buying points for millions of $$from tesla. Producing their own is cheaper than buying points, which getting more expensive the harsher the emission limits are. They need to lower the fleet emissions. Ev's are the only way to get them. That's pushing the agenda through the backdoor.
Negative effect: more Ev's means more cobalt and lithium needed. The resources are mined with manpower in 3rd world countries with disregard of human life, environment and safety. Companies pledged to only buy from safe and complying sources, but they cannot keep up with the sources, so they keep buying from the bad guys, producing child labor, slave labor and poison the surroundings.
Degenerated elite lobbyists don't care, as they get their money out of it. At the end, we will see a devastating disaster, where everyone has to suffer, except the ones responsible.
This push is wrong. I'm not saying we need to go from electric, but a healthy mix is the key.
Oil, natural gas and e- power, where it makes sense. And quit hinder the infrastructure for lpg, which is right now the best source to lower co emissions.
Just my 5 ct.
 

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Most pickups are used around town or on jobsites and not to tow a trailer thousands of miles. Contractors and service businesses will appreciate having vastly reduced maintenance costs with the electric pickups and not losing time with their trucks in the shop for oil changes and filter changes and repairs. And with an electric vehicle there is far less for a mechanic to have to figure out and the industry is short of competent mechanics of all types.
 

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Electric motor vehicle power numbers are always impressive, but you need to remember that an electric motor produces maximum torque right a way, it does not have to build torque like a gas or Diesel engine does. The more load you put on an electric motor the more energy it uses, wait until you get to that long hill. Further how long is it going to take to charge that electric motors battery pack and where are the charging stations going to be?

I can fill up my Diesel in 10 minutes and be back on the road again, will I have to go out of my way to even find a charging station and then will I have to sit there for the next several hours waiting for it to recharge? I know they claim a Tesla will fast charge to 80% in about 30 to 45 minutes but damn that is a long time to wait for a partial charge with less range now.

A range of 300 miles on a 100% charge is reduced to only 240 miles on an 80% charge.

If you only have the standard battery pack that gives you a 230 mile range an 80% charge reduces your range down to only 184 miles.

Sorry but they can keep all their electric vehicles.
I fly model electric R/C planes. When you "Fast-Charge" your LiPo battery, it's life is shortened, so you'll need to replace it sooner. I'm guessing the same will happen with E.V. batteries. I'm sure the cost to replace THEM is a LOT more then my model airplane 14v batteries, which cost around $30 each! When these trucks and cars are tested for mile distance, they are NOT I believe driven under conditions WE would use them. How many of us get "EPA" mileage listed on the sticker of a new gas or diseal vehicle? Plus how much more is that "1500" E.V. to a 5.7l hemi'? You can KEEP E.V. trucks, I'll stick with my 2015 5.7!!!
 

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Most pickups are used around town or on jobsites and not to tow a trailer thousands of miles. Contractors and service businesses will appreciate having vastly reduced maintenance costs with the electric pickups and not losing time with their trucks in the shop for oil changes and filter changes and repairs. And with an electric vehicle there is far less for a mechanic to have to figure out and the industry is short of competent mechanics of all types.
And in what world do YOU live? Most of those I know who own truck use them more the just around town! Oh, sorry boss, we forgot to plug in the truck last night, so we won't be able to get the load to the site! Or, sorry boss, we forgot to plug in the truck last night, so we won't be able to drive the 100 mile round trip pulling the 3,000lb trailor to bring that backhoe to the job site!
 

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The specs of the standard F150 EV would meet my truck needs just fine. However, my RAM is low usage, so I won't be in the market to replace it for quite some time. Which is fine with me because EVs just don't sound the same!
 

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The specs of the standard F150 EV would meet my truck needs just fine. However, my RAM is low usage, so I won't be in the market to replace it for quite some time. Which is fine with me because EVs just don't sound the same!
1st, I would never buy a Ford product again. 2nd, my 2015 Ram 1500 5.7 is equipped with a "Classic" 60's-70's style "Cherry Bomb"! I have 2 on my 69' 340 Dart Swinger 4spd and it's "Music" to my ears! At 66 years, I DON'T plan on driving a "Vaccuum Cleaner/Toaster" in MY LIFETIME!!!
 

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Barney is over in my Coal forum and I suspect he is a professional shill or should I say troll? Same lines, same tired crap.
 

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The Ford F-150 Lightning EV pickup arrives in one year with impressive specs and aggressive pricing. There's a lot of discussion on the relative merits of gas vs EV, with a strong concern over long trips and towing. Fact is most owners seldom take extended trips, with towing limited and confined to lighter trailers.

RAM has promised an EV pickup; not much is known yet. Agree or not as to whether 1500-segment EVs can compete with gas/Diesel, we're about to find out. EVs are rapidly expanding into all segments, and the 1500s are in the pipeline. They're not aimed at the drivers that require 35 gal tanks and 5th-wheel towing capacity. These EV pickups will appeal to many that use a pickup locally and only drive within the ranges from home.

I'm looking forward to RAM being competitive on specs and pricing. Here's the bar:
  • Five-passenger SuperCrew cab with a 5.5-foot bed. Same dimensions as its conventional counterpart. Common accessories and equipment will work and fit just the same.
  • Maximum payload of 2,000 pounds, of which 400 pounds can go in the frunk where the engine used to be.
  • Maximum tow up to 10,000 pounds.
  • With extended battery: 563 horsepower, 775 lb-ft of torque, and a driving range of about 300 miles on a single charge.
  • With standard battery: 426 hp, 775 lb-ft, and a range of about 230 miles.
  • Front and rear motors provide standard all-wheel drive, and skidplates protect the underbody while off-roading.
  • It retains the full-size spare tire in the back.
2022 F-150 Lightning First Look
$55k+ for the xlt, no price yet with 300 mile battery, 5.5' box. Ya, that'll work for a construction truck! LOL
 
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