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Hey Guys -

Got a 2000 Dodge Ram 4x4 5.9, Flowmaster single in/dual out system. Just installed the cheapo $150 T304 Stainless headers from Ebay. The install was actually quite a pain in the arse.....as the first problem was they included the wrong threaded bolts.....so had to go to hardware store and pick up the correct threaded bolts, which I wanted Stainless anyway. Next, the shorty headers are so "short" that the position of the bends in half of the tubes and placement of the header bolts, make them near impossible to use any kind of common tool to install. Just no clearance to get anything on the bolt heads. Anyway, after finally wresting with them, got them all on and tightened, and although on first few start ups, didn't notice any leaking, but now, there is a definite leak from the drivers side. Not a huge leak, but enough to be annoying. After the near 5 hour install and busted up hands.......I really am not in any hurry to fiddle with it again. Is there anything I can do to fix the leak besides pulling the headers off and trying a different gasket? I'm seriously wishing I'd of left the old rusty manifolds on (which I threw out btw), cause at least they were quiet and sealed.

I do notice a decent gain in power though, it certainly feels quicker in low-mid range, but I don't like it leaking. I also hear a header leak can be bad for your valves if you leave it leaking pro-longed. Another odd thing is that the entire exhaust system is actually quieter now with the headers?? Ever heard of that? I've had headers on an LS1 powered Camaro SS and a Mustang 5.0, and both made exhaust louder. So seemed odd these made mine quieter. Any suggestions for fixes for the leak would be helpful. I might just take it to an exhaust shop and let them try and seal it...think that'd work?

Thanks guys!
 

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Back in the old days of RB engines, putting on exhaust headers always seemed to mean retorque, retorque, and more retorqueing. If you have not run them to the point of blowing out the gaskets, you might consider retorqueing them after warming them up, cuz once good and hot, the gaskets used to shrink a little, and then every 6 months or so thereafter. Sooner or later, they seemed to set up OK, by then, however, they used to get quite rusty, and you would end up repeating the whole cycle over again, but I live in the land of road salt lovers...
 
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