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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Well, after swapping in 2013+ PJ's into my 2010 RAM I had a OEM set of Dual's kicking around in the shop. Since work has been slow and this has become somewhat of an obsession. I decided today was the day I'd open the Duals up in preparation for retrofitting in a Morimoto D2S Projector. I'll preface this conversation by saying, I've never painted anything other than a wall with a paint brush let alone pick up a can of spray paint, and have never done a retrofit...
Plan is to do the dual headlights first incase I screw them up before I tackle retrofitting in the FXR into the 2013+ Pj's.

Retrofitting a Mini H1 into the Quads will be a pretty similar process, so I'd say this is pretty much bang on. There are some good videos on Youtube on how to do the quad with another brand projector but it's very similar.

Hardware:
OEM Dual headlight with 90,000KM
Morimoto Mini D2S Projector (B Stock) $60
Morimoto 5500 XB HID D2H Bulb (D2H is a D2S with amp connections) $40
DDM Ballast (for now) $30
Morimoto Butyl Rubber $15
Retrofitsource Apollo 3.0 Shroud (B-stock) for painting $15

Paint:
Krylon Colormax Primer $3.99
Krylon Colormax Satin Black $3.99
DO NOT USE AN ALL IN ONE PAINT+PRIMER. "PLASTIC" paint will not stick on our headlights either! See my lessons learned below.

Tools you'll need
Dremel, and associated bits for boring
Drill may come in handy.
Red or Gray scotch brite OR 300-600 grit sand paper
1000 grit sand paper
An oven
Flathead screw driver
Large pair of plyers
Channel locks

Summary of Steps:
I'll list them all, and then we'll go into detail on them
1. Open headlights
2. Disassemble reflector (optional)
3. Dremel to open up the H13 headlight socket (H11 if you're using quads)
4. Test fit projector
5. Hand tighten/ aim
6. Tighten and check aim
7. Adjust/Fill if needed
8. Trim shroud to fit.
9. Disassemble and prep for painting
10. 2-3 coats primer
11. 2-4 coats paint
12. Re-fit projector, hand tight. Check aim and align
13. Tighten the nut, and recheck the aim, adjust the projector some more
14. Tighten the nut more, and recheck the aim, adjust projector if needed.
15. Purge with compressed air
16. Apply butyl tape, and preheat oven
17. Reseal headlights
18. Have a beer

Lessons Learned
Okay before we get started, let me preface this tutorial with my lessons' learned so you can avoid screwing up as much as I did.
If I had to do this over again, I'd do it differently from the start up. First, aftermarket headlights are easier to open, but truth be told this was one of the easier parts of this whole ordeal. Do not be afraid of opening them. Second, the Mini-D2S 3" is a great projector, and I chose it because it can run OEM bulbs. However, it was originally designed to retrofit into an H4 headlight which has a much larger opening than the H13 bulb in the dual headlights. It will certainly be a pain in the ass to retrofit into a quad headlight. If I could start over I'd use the Morimoto Mini H1 simply because it has a 27mm shaft vs a 37mm shaft. Therefore, less chance of screwing up your alignment by taking too much of the housing and losing the base on the housing like I did. If you do decide to keep the D2S, great! Here's what I suggest you do differently.... Don't use a hole saw because it is very hard to get it to be concentric with the socket and you may be off center, or take too much. Use a dremel, and take your time. Take only as much as needed.

Next, regarding paint. There is no benefit to removing the chrome with bleach like I did. Simply scuff up the chrome with a red or gray scotchbrite pad, or steel wool. Next, do not use an all in one paint. I used krylon for plastic first after bleaching/scuffing the parts I was painting and it did not stick at all. Why? Plastic is a general term, and plastic paints only stick to very specific plastics. The plastic paints work by mixing the paint with acetone and other solvents which will melt ABS, PVC and other soft injection molded type plastics. The paint is basically a glue and becomes part of the plastic. Our headlights are made of thermoset plastics which are not soluable, nor will they reliquify with heat. Therefore, this type of paint doesn't work. Use a conventional primer and paint! It will look better, and it will be durable.

Lastly, the dual headlight housings make it very difficult to remove the reflector bucket without breaking something. If you can, just paint them in place. You can remove one simply by reaching in with a 10mm wrench and prying it up. The adjuster one you can remove simply by holding the reflector and turning the adjuster in until it pops out. The last one which is hidden is a bastard. You can't get a tool on it from the top. What I suggest instead is that you take a drill to the back of the plastic housing where the torx screws hold the pivot points in, OR heating the assembly in the oven before you pull on the reflector to remove it. If you simply pull on it with all your might when cold you will break something, trust me :/

To summarize:
If this is your first retrofit, use a Mini H1. Don't remove the reflectors, just scuff the paint, and use a conventional primer+paint. OH, and don't put any painters tape on chrome you plan on keeping (IE: turn signal), it will pull it up if you leave it on too long. Instead use plastic wrap or tape over it...see below for example.

Last minute tips:
1.Get some tack cloth to wipe your stuff down before you paint, and between coats (if it's dry). It is also good for cleaning before reassembly since it'll pick up dust/ hair, etc.
2. Handle the projector with care. Don't use any solvent like alcohol to clean it. Simply use compressed air in the bowl and lens. You can wipe the lens with a microfibre cloth. Blow clean with compressed air.
Lets get started:

First lets take a look at this Mini D2S thing so we can get an idea on how to install it, the Mini H1 is similar just smaller.:

Basically you install it by slipping it through your headlight socket, and then tightening the nut. You can see it has a large silicon washer that the projector sits in. This will seat right against your OEM reflector, and then you simply tighten the large nut that it comes with down until it's snug (after you've aligned it of course). Easy peasy right?

Step 1.
It is really important you don't rush or force things too much. Careful not to break the mounting tabs as you manhandle the headlight. The permaseal will never liquify on the OEM headlights like it will on an aftermarket butyl sealed headlight. It will get soft (but still tough) as you heat it but it will cool down and harden. If things become too tough, simply pop it back into the oven for another 10 minutes and keep working your way around the outside with your flathead.

Preheat the oven first, don't place it directly on the rack and ensure no part of the oven is contacting your headlight. Use a piece of cardboard or put a cloth down on a cookie sheet.

First bake 17 mins at 260. Pry the two inner tabs up and then put the screwdriver between the outter most lens and the plastic housing and slide around the headlight to break the seal and removing permaseal as you go.
Final bake 12 mins at 260, on the inside lower where the bottom tab and reinforced corner is, push the screwdriver in and pry until the headlight breaks loose. It should be tough but not overly so. It won't come right up so you may need to reheat it a couple more times to get it out from the opposite corner and work the screwdriver in there.




Step 2. Separating the reflector

There really is no benefit to doing this other than making it slightly easier to paint and work with. . There are little balls and sockets that hold it in at 3 points. (housing and reflector) . One is the adjuster that goes in and out. The first one you can access just above the turn signal with a 10mm wrench. I use the wrench to wedge and pry up to separate it. Next, hold the reflector with your hand and turn the adjuster clockwise to lower the adjuster until you hear a pop. Now you've got two out. One left that is hidden. You can see it just barely by looking through the back of the headlight housing, but you won't be able to get any tool in there to help you. You have a few choices to get this one out....
a. If you don't want to drill, or cut the housing, I recommend you heat the whole thing up (lets say 250deg F for 10 minutes and give it a straight pull. It should come out pretty easy with heat.

b. you can drill from the back to gain access to the torx and simply unthread it.

c. You can cut into the housing to get a wrench in there (I had to do this) or You'll have to reseal this once you're done.

 

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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
3. Dremel to open up the H13 headlight socket (H11 if you're using quads)
Okay, If you're using the Mini-D2S you'll need about 37mm for the shaft to fit through. So you'll be taking a lot of material off here. Just use the 80 grit sand paper cylindrical bit and take your time. It won't take that long honestly. Keep checking to see if it'll fit, but keep the projector away from the work area because you'll get dust f'kn everywhere! Before you can do this you'll need to remove the OEM reflector cap. At the back of the headlight you'll see a small clip folded over, straighten this out and then pull the cap away from the reflector. Wiggle wiggle wiggle! :)


Before:


After:
Also, take off about half of the base the reflector cap holds onto just below the bulb opening. You'll also run your solenoid wires through here.


4. Test fit projector
I should tell you, the solenoid and cutoff go on the bottom. Since you're going to test align these on a wall before putting them back together. You won't make this mistake right? Right? Well people do put them in upside down, so don't let that be you.


5. Hand tighten/ aim
Before you begin, park 15-20 feet back from a wall and mark where your lights hit the wall like I did with painters tape, or whatever you've got. You'll use this as your reference.

6. Tighten and check aim
This is important as it will shift as you tighten it, so I hold the projector while I tighten however, keep double checking your aim because once you seal them up it'll be a PITA to get flat again. I just eyeballed it horizontal.

7. Adjust/Fill if needed
Now if you're like me and were impatient and took too much and the projector isn't seating properly because you removed the flat cylindrical base from the oem bulb seat.....You'll need to fill. I used some JB weld plastic putty. I built up the back of the reflector so it was all the same height, and then sanded it flush. This will guarantee that you don't crack the housing by loading it unevenly and get a nice tight, flat fit. Now if you've been paying attention and only took the bare minimum, you can skip this entirely, and I really hope you do....

That looks better! :D Now repeat steps 5-7. I also re-used the H4 washer and shimmed it to get a bit more vertical adjustment. I simply used a piece of plastic, credit card thickness is plenty. Aluminum tape could work too.
8. Trim shroud to fit.
You only need to trim a small rectangle out from the corner of the shroud which will contact the step in the light where the turnsignal ends. If you are using a mini H1 and a small shroud you probaly won't have to trim anything!


9. Disassemble and prep for painting
If you're a chrome on chrome guy, Prepare for resealing, you're done! Maybe do one last check to make sure your alignment is where it should be. Skip to step 15.
To prep the surface, use a gray or red scotch brite and just lightly scuff up the chrome surfaces you intend on painting. Wash with soap and water afterward and dry. Before painting, use a tack cloth (1.99 at Canadian tire...I cut mine in 2). This will ensure there is no dust/hair/lint/oil on the surface.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
10. 2-3 coats primer
First things first, Don't tape up your reflector bucket like this!

Tape it over the turn signal bucket like this!

Otherwise you may remove chrome or the paint will leak through the tape and paint the reflector... It will be impossible to remove too... You've been warned! The second pic is easier to do anyway.
Like this:


Lets get to primering! It is easier if you elevate the items on boxes like I did so you can keep the can horizontal somewhat. It also helps keep dust off your parts as the paint will statically charge this stuff and pull dust from the ground.
Light coats! Primer is pretty forgiving, so use the primer as practice. Don't expect full coverage in the first coat. The rule is 50% 90% 100% (Coat 1, 2, 3). Allow previous coat to dry before applying another one (can will guide you, but use your judgement)






Take the time now to sand out any imperfections. 600 grit wetsand would be ideal. Blow clean with compressed air, use tack cloth to clean it up. Allow it to dry overnight before proceeding to paint. (Or whatever the can says)
10.1. Test your solenoid while you're waiting for the paint to dry.
Use the solenoid pigtail your Mini D2S or mini H1 projector came with and hook it up to the projector. Now, using a 9V battery, press down on the + side with your thumb, and using your free hand connect the negative side. It isn't polar so don't worry about which side is which. Now, with the free hand, engage/disengage the solenoid 40 times and make sure it works without sticking. Do the same with the other projector. Any problems? contact the retrofit source.
11. 2-4 coats paint



If you've used primer you'll use a lot less paint. Light coats is key. Don't expect full coverage in the first coat. The rule is 50% 90% 100% (Coat 1, 2, 3). Allow to dry overnight or whatever the can says. Also, after the paint has dried to handle (I let mine sit for 30 mins) remove the tape. If you have any defects in your paint from dust landing or what have you, you can clean this up with 1000grit wetsand....Then spray the area again with a light coat after you've cleaned it (tack cloth). Tack cloth between coats will help eliminate dust that will inevitably fall on you work. If you do have any, don't worry, let it completely dry before you attempt to fix it. You can sand it out or sometimes just paint over it.

FYI: Removing/Reinstalling the orange turn signal part is difficult. Apply heat in the oven or use a heat gun to make the clips somewhat softer. It'll pop right in or out after it is warm. If you try to do it cold you'll crack it.

12. Re-fit projector, hand tight. Check aim and align



13. Tighten the nut, and recheck the aim, adjust the projector some more
14. Tighten the nut more, and recheck the aim, adjust projector if needed.

15. Purge with compressed air
16. Apply butyl tape, and preheat oven

I used the moritmoto stuff and it comes a bit thick. You stretch it out quite a bit to fill most of the void in the channel. Preheat oven to 270F as per directions on the box. Apply a bit of pressure on the lens, once everything is clean and you're ready to do it, and throw it in the oven.
17. Reseal headlights
After 12 minute, press firmly and use some channel locks to help seat the lens, push the clips in as the lens falls in place properly. Keep adding pressure until it has cooled down a bit :) Repeat for both sides.








I apologize for the bad photographs. As it turns out the lens reflects a lot of light and with a shitty camera phone it was difficult to get a good photo :p. My lens' were scratched pretty bad even after 2 applications of polish and wax. I will refinish them with wet sanding another day.

18. Have a beer. Reinstall on truck, and admire your handy work.
Before installing the HID bulb in, clean it with alcohol to ensure no oil is on there. If you do you'll have a hotspot and shorten the bulb life/risk a bulb explosion. The morimoto bulbs come with a little wet nap type thing for you to do this.

After thoughts:
This is the first time I've used spray paint, or done a headlight retrofit. Honestly, the benefit of using primer especially if this is your first time is it gives you a good idea on how to lay the paint on. I'm honestly amazed how good the paint turned out and how good they look. All things considered, screwing up was a good thing beacuse I got practice to do it right the second time. You have the benefit of learning from my mistakes and doing it right!!! I'm happy to help anyone taking this on. If a clumsy oaf like me can do it, so can you.

I haven't installed them on the truck yet, coming soon:
 

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I must say that is one good write up. Great job on that. Really makes me want to try but can't afford the down time on my truck. How long did it take?
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Interestingly enough, my motivation for doing this was to prove a point that HID in a halogen projector like the sports, is NOT equal to a real HID projector. The bowls are designed differently, the lens is different. It is equivalent to wearing someone elses glasses and expecting to see better... Lets not even talk about putting HID into a halogen reflector....

For proof, I kept the 4500K morimoto 35W bulbs in my Sport projectors on the right while I tested the new Mini D2s in the left (5500K bulb). The differences you'll see are because the bulb is not broken in on the left, and the lens in the D2S is clear. Also, the bowl in the D2S is wider and designed for the HID so the focal point is sharply defined at the top portion of the cutoff, and is distributed evenly along the entire width. The bulbs are rated at the same lumen output 3200 lumens. However, you can clearly see that the D2S projector is significantly better output. A halogen projector simply cannot use the extra light or focus it well enough to really take advantage of HID.

Compared to the HID in teh sport light, the distribution is not as even and you can see that the majority of hte light is located in a circle below the step in the cutoff, and the light disappates quickly as it goes out to the sides. This translates to intense foreground lighting and not a lot of distance/width vision. For someone like me who drives in areas where there is no ambient lighting, and wildlife/ice/whathave you are a concern. This simply isn't good enough.

Now, I'm not saying HID's in the sport/laramie lights aren't good! I thought they were pretty kickass especially with the highbeam, but this is a whole new level of awesome. I can't wait to try these at night.

Pics!




This is taken during the day BTW. Each pic I focused on the same point on the garage away from the lights to try and make it comparable.
 

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Great pics and breakdown. How long did it take?
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Great pics and breakdown. How long did it take?
I had this set of headlights doing nothing on the shelf so I didn't need to worry about taking my truck out of commision. For this reason I'd recommend you buy a second set of headlights like a cheap set of DEPO's off ebay for like $130 and use those to do the retrofit.

It took me a long while but if I was doing another set, and used mini H1 in a quad/dual housing instead of the mini d2s, and wasn't painting. I could probably do a set in 3 hours. If I did another mini d2s I could probably do it right the first time in the same amount of time. I'd just recommend that for your first one you do a mini h1 simply because you have to trim way less.

Painting needs overnight time to dry so consider that when you're doing the retrofit. It took me a long while because I used shitty paint the first time and had to scrub it all off, and start over. Doing it right the first time is much faster, so learn from my mistakes. It was my first time ever, spray painting. I'm much more confident with it now, so again I could probably do this start to finish much much faster a second time.

If it's your first retrofit, consider not painting, going with a mini h1, and you'll be fine. Opening and resealing the headlights is not very hard so long as you take your time. Plan an hour per headlight to open them on your first try. Honestly the first headlight took me a couple re-bakes before I kinda figured it out, the second headlight I got open in 30 minutes and 2 times in the oven vs. 5 or 6 on the first.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks for the awesome write up! Can't wait to do mine!
Yah man be sure to post a thread on it! :D I'm looking forward to it.

How do ya think mine turned out?? I admit the photos really don't do them justice because of the reflection, of me, in the lens haha... But they really do look quite good in person.
 

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They came out pretty good! You will love them once you see how they are on the truck at night.

One piece of advice for people with the turn signal reflector bowl....unless my lights were different (from ebay), the chrome reflector bowl could be removed with two screws and can eliminate the need for using tape to cover them. Now that I think about it, yours must not have had screws but different sets that I bought from ebay from different sellers, had screws to remove them entirely from the bezel. Just some food for thought!
 

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Discussion Starter #12
They came out pretty good! You will love them once you see how they are on the truck at night.

One piece of advice for people with the turn signal reflector bowl....unless my lights were different (from ebay), the chrome reflector bowl could be removed with two screws and can eliminate the need for using tape to cover them. Now that I think about it, yours must not have had screws but different sets that I bought from ebay from different sellers, had screws to remove them entirely from the bezel. Just some food for thought!
This just goes to show you that the ebay lights make good retrofit lights and the OEM's you're better off selling :p.

OEM is one cast plastic piece so unfortunately your stuck with taping it. However, IT is easy to tape because you know that orange thing is going to cover most of it so if you build a bridge over it like I did you won't have any issues.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Quick update: Put them on the truck and made a wiring harness so that the lights are Plug and play H13. I also used some 3M Velcro stuff to mount the ballast/ignitor onto the actual headlamp so that I can remove the whole together just by unplugging the headlight and turn signal socket. Error canceller and relay harness is tucked away behind the grill.

Waiting for nightfall so I can try these things out!








Now, they look pretty frigging fantastic on the truck so now I'm wondering whether it's worth while keeping the 2013+ sport lights or keeping these. I originally intended on building these to sell.
 

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No way Jose!! Keep those puppies on! They look awesome.
 

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WOW! That output is nice! Is that the low or high beam?

Aren't you concerned about the ballast getting too hot and melting the plastic on the light?
 

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Discussion Starter #17 (Edited)
WOW! That output is nice! Is that the low or high beam?

Aren't you concerned about the ballast getting too hot and melting the plastic on the light?
Lowbeams only for all except the one below. Was trying to show the cutoff. My camera (iphone 4s) couldn't really capture the highbeam due to the intensity of the foreground(reflection from the snow).

No, the 35W ballasts run at 40W. 35W at the bulb, 5W lost at the ballast. 5W isn't going to melt through the housing any time soon. They get sorta lukewarm. I ran them inside the sport lamps without melting/damaging anything so I had confidence mounting them up here. They are potted too so no worries about them getting wet :)

Anyway, no foglight on the planet you'd be able to see a difference with these on :p. That's how good they are.

Second thought:
I think this might be highbeam but I can't be sure because i'm aiming up a hill.

Your mini H1 V7's will probably look just as good and wider. What's nice about the V7's is that they have a foreground limiter...
 

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Good to know! I hate how my ballasts are mounted now (zip tied to frame near headlights) and there really isn't much wire play. How does the retrofits "error canceler for RAM" work? Does it get rid of the "light out" warning? Light come this weekend, but I'm too backed up on project to work on cracking them open.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Good to know! I hate how my ballasts are mounted now (zip tied to frame near headlights) and there really isn't much wire play. How does the retrofits "error canceler for RAM" work? Does it get rid of the "light out" warning? Light come this weekend, but I'm too backed up on project to work on cracking them open.
From what I know the retrofitsource's error cancelers work well but I don't run them. I am running some cheap error canceler/anti-flicker capacitors off ebay $10....Firemedic runs the same ones on his truck without incident. So yes they eliminate the warnings/flickering

On my 2010 I don't have any error message center really but if I don't run the error canceler I'll get flickering. I can eliminate this by simply putting a capacitor across the +- on the relay but I wired the ebay one into my relay circuit.

However, previously waht I did is have everything stuffed into the sport projector housing without relays and they worked good too...

I have to run relays because my truck came equipped with duals from the factory so If I want high+low beam action I have to run a relay and a diode. However, I am getting a shop to reprogram my TIPM so I can disable DRL (and move the drl to the side markers) and keep the lows + highs on. AT which point I'll remove the relay.
 

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I currently have a capacitor in mine in the power feed to the relay. Without it the relay hums like no other but I don't get flickering. I still get dash warning but it's not as annoying as when I had LEDs in my tail lights with no resistors.
 
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