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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know there is a thread with a loooooong debate on which spark plugs to use. I decided to go with NGK but could not find them easily on line. I saw one location where the stock NGK ZFR5C-11's were $3.89 + shipping brought them to over $70 for 16. I contacted my local dodge dealer and at first they said that they replace them with Champions. I asked him to take a look at the box. He came back to the phone a said I was right. The plugs were in a Mopar box with NGK's inside. Mopar part# SPLZFR5C11. Oh...and they wanted $5.39 a plug ($86.24 + tax). I found the below online wholesaler and they have them for $3.05 plus $12 shipping. Brings the grand total to $60.80

http://dodge-wholesale.com/catalog/product_info.php?products_id=18016
 

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thanks for the tip :D
 

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Rep points for doing your homework... great info for everyone.. now my question is is the mopar part number only for NKG or is that for Champion as well ???
 

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The reason i ask is that both times I had the plugs changed on my 08 the dealer always left the parts for me to look at and both times they were Champions in a Mopar box. Wish I had kept the box now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Curious....I did ask him to look in the box and he said NGK. ZFR5C-11 is unique to NGK so it looks like they just added the SPL to make it a Mopar part number.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)

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My Ram dealer sells SPLZFR5C11 for $4.45. They are in a MOPAR box and are NGK plugs.
They are assembled in U.S.A. from Japanese parts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The plugs got here today. They are in a mopar box with NGK plugs inside. And by the way...they are not copper...they are nickel.
 

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The plugs got here today. They are in a mopar box with NGK plugs inside. And by the way...they are not copper...they are nickel.
The core is copper with a Nickel alloy plating. :)
 

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I'm still wanting to know where the thread or source info exists as to why we're allegedly not supposed to use precious metal plugs in our hemi's. I'm not saying it isn't so, I'm just saying I haven't found it among the many spark plug threads I've searched and read so far.
 

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Champion PN 570. Just bought them yesterday and they have the same PN as the sticker under my hood. As long as this thing likes 1.99 Champion plugs, why bother with Iridium or platinum or any other more expensive type?
 

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Yep NGK's, same plugs i pulled out of my stock 09 Ram.
 

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Champion PN 570. Just bought them yesterday and they have the same PN as the sticker under my hood. As long as this thing likes 1.99 Champion plugs, why bother with Iridium or platinum or any other more expensive type?
Well, the ability to run about 100,000 miles vs 30,000 miles might be a factor.
 

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I dont care how long they run..I just want them to perform well and be reliable (us old school guys dont mind changin plugs)...been running ngk 4306 coppers for over 150k miles (changed frequently for my peace of mind), before that i did try iridiums an platinums... saw no difference with iridiums and i was throwin error codes with platinums...
 

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I dont care how long they run..I just want them to perform well and be reliable (us old school guys dont mind changin plugs)...been running ngk 4306 coppers for over 150k miles (changed frequently for my peace of mind), before that i did try iridiums an platinums... saw no difference with iridiums and i was throwin error codes with platinums...
Old school, eh? My first car was a '57 Chevy in which I installed a 409, Muncie 4-spd, and 12-bolt rear axle when I was 16 back I don't mind working on just about anything. My '12 Express may run like a hot rod from the old days, but I don't particularly want to keep throwing spark plugs into it if I don't have to. If you're drag racing or doing other frequent performance oriented activities with your truck, that's great and lots of fun. I want my truck to reliably pull a travel trailer and be able to go coast-to-coast without drama or having to putz with it anymore than necessary. I have my motorcycles for out-and-out performance addiction now. I've done a simple intake and exhaust mod to my truck, and I and probably lots of others would like our spark plugs to go much more than 30K in a modern vehicle...like just about every other modern car or truck these days.

Frankly I think it's downright silly to have such a recommendation in the modern world with sophisticated FI, ignition, unleaded fuels, and precious metal plug availability...especially with 16 spark plugs. Now don't get me wrong. I love this truck. I have a good deal of automotive experience in both stock and hotrodding. I'd just like to hear or see the bottom line, official reason as why this engine allegedly won't run precious metal plugs. If yours threw codes with with platinum plugs, I'm not doubting it...I'd just like to know the engineering issue that caused it. And now with the police car hemi allegedly running precious metal spark plugs, I'd like to know even more why our trucks won't run them.

Fred, even some of us who know how to do all manner of service, repair, or modding to a vehicle don't necessarily want to change the plugs in our daily drivers every 30K. IMO it just shouldn't be necessary these days if there's any viable alternative.
 

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Anyone try the E3's??
As much as I like precious metal plugs over the older more conventional plug design, I don't think a design like the E3 brings any benefit to the performance table. In fact I'd almost be concerned with the electrode design possibly shielding the spark a bit depending on how it was indexed. Spark plugs aren't magic, and if fact they may the simplest item in the engine. Improving ignition in an existing engine almost always involves the coil and/or computer manipulation of the spark. As long as the spark plug has sufficient conductive quality and a gap that doesn't prohibit spark jump, there's not a lot more that the plug can do. A hotter spark with more energy is good and in many cases so is a spark that has multiple discharges. The multiple discharge design is what made MSD famous for many years in many engine applications. Oddly, however, many of todays combustion chamber and valve designs in cylinder heads don't benefit as much from multiple spark discharge. And the hotter spark issue isn't always required as long as the engine's existing ignition design is capable igniting combustion. More sophisticated and efficient valve and combustion chamber designs, along with fuel injection, have negated the need for many of these aftermarket ignition devices. Now, when you start manipulting that existing engine with aftermarket mods like a turbo, supercharger, higher compression, and some other more extreme mods that put pressure on the combustion processs, those "older-school" ignition mods "can/might" bring some higher performance back to the existing ignition system on the engine.

Still, the spark plug's contribution to all this is minimal as long as the plug gap and heat range are properly selected. Where the plug quality has its biggest influence is the wear factor over high mileage and how it affects a continued level of performance. This is where precious metal plugs can be a noticeable benefit...not producing more power, but delivering the same power over a longer time. The precious metal referred to wears better and keeps its shape over a longer period of time, thus maintaining the proper spark. Again, this isn't magic either, and in an exaggerated example, it's like using a shovel made out of steel rather than one made of a very hard plastic. Hard plastic can be designed to dig the hole about as good as a steel one, but it obviously won't hold up as well over time. Having an engine with 16 plugs, it would be a realistic advantage IMO to have spark plugs that last over 3 times longer while yielding the same results.

And I speak from a bit of experience with this in my last engine. I had a stroked 350 GM small block to 383 with an MSD ignition in my last truck. Even with a wider plug gap, the precious metal plugs I installed went 100K with no issue, no ignition breakdown under acceleration, and no breakdown under load. In fact when I pulled those plugs for replacement, they appeared to be capable of many more miles. I just didn't feel like pushing the envelope any further. I went another 100K on another set of precious metal plugs and just sold that truck in November with those plugs still in it. A neighbor has that truck now.

And of course, I'm talking about vehicles used primarily for street use here. In the extreme environment of "race only" applications, no one uses plugs for 100K miles. Even a weekend warrior racer might want to replace the plugs more often so as to not leave any stone unturned in the pursuit of every performance advantage. Still, I think it's pretty impressive how long a good precious metal plug can provided sustained performance, even in a modded engine.
 
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