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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is the hemi motor ok to use this filter in?There seems to be some that say it's no good and could lead to mechanical damage.Seems the oil can damage some sensors depending how the motor is seup.Anyone else hear this?Is it ok in the hemi?Thanks all.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yes,the drop in one. Something about it being an oil type and if oiled too much can mess with some sensors.I have't heard of it being bad for a Hemi, more so Ford on account of where in the plumbing they put their sensors.Anyone know anymore?
 

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excess oil can mess up sensors. thats pretty much all you need to know when you clean it. might want to check afe syntha flow? not sure if that is the correct name. supposed to be a dry hi flow filter. others that know more about them will most likely chime in.
 

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i used one in my 08 and just put one in my new 12, havent had a problems with it
 

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I've done many magazine articles using K&N products and even used their own flow bench for several of them. They are a company that is commited to product excellence and quality. If there was even a hint of an issue like this with a product it would be quickly rectified or the product would be pulled from store inventory. I have every confidence in K&N as a company.
 
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I think what he might be referring to is the habit some folks have of over-oiling the K and N filters. The only need a light coat of oil to catch particles that are drawn thru the filter. There's a tendency to think that if a little oil on the screen is good, then more must be better. Too much oil pulls the oil thru the throttle body and can ruin a MaF sensor. Properly installed and maintained, K and N does not harm your engine....there are thousands in use.Do a google search on "over oiling a K and N filter".

The argument I've heard is that K and N screens let more particulate matter in than a good paper filter....so some folks have gone back to the stock filter. Simply installed on its own with no other mods, the K and N does little or nothing for performance in spite of ads to the contrary. It does NOT give you more horses, or gas economy. The most it does is hit your VISA and give you a throaty engine sound when the engine ignition sounds come back up thru the filter you get a whine similar to a supercharger. Lots of guys really like the sound. I'm not sure some sound is worth the money....but folks also spend a lot of money on mufflers....so sound is a big motivator.
 

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I'm curious about an element with these aftermarket CAI's on the gen 4 Ram hemi. Do most of them still draw air only from that single fender well hole?...or do they all have an additional inlet hole somewhere? I haven't seen one up close to inspect it for myself. I know that one or two of the more common CAI's, like a Volant I believe, provide a secondary intake hole. I guess what I'm asking is, if a CAI is only drawing air through that highly congested OEM fender hole, are you really getting full benefit from a CAI? This is one thing I liked about jmr's mod with the OEM airbox and a drop-in K&N. You're insured of more air volume with 2 inlets like some of the CAI's I've seen mentioned here. And while there's some argument about the ribbed vs. smooth airbox-to-throttle body tube, most of what I've read is that it's not the massive issue some make it out to be. The biggest benefit of an aftermarket CAI is the additional air volume available through the huge filter, but if there's still only one, relatively small inlet hole, that may limit the benefit. Again, I haven't seen any of them in the flesh, so that's why I'm asking.
 

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The argument I've heard is that K and N screens let more particulate matter in than a good paper filter....so some folks have gone back to the stock filter. Simply installed on its own with no other mods, the K and N does little or nothing for performance in spite of ads to the contrary. It does NOT give you more horses, or gas economy. The most it does is hit your VISA and give you a throaty engine sound when the engine ignition sounds come back up thru the filter you get a whine similar to a supercharger. Lots of guys really like the sound. I'm not sure some sound is worth the money....but folks also spend a lot of money on mufflers....so sound is a big motivator.
THis is how the internet can be a bad thing. Every K&N product comes with a dyno chart to show what improvement it makes over stock. K&N will not sell a product that shows zero improvement. What the purchaser has to decide is if the improvement is enough to warrant the cost of the item. In the case of their CAI for the Hemi, the improvement is small, but quantifiable. When you combine it with other things like a free-flowing exhaust or engine mods then it becomes more noticeable. If your plans include those other mods you aren't likely to handcuff them with the stock intake system, so a K&N would be a good complement to them. On its own, I agree, the expense of a K&N CAI is probably money better spent elsewhere, but to say it has no benefit is just plain wrong. Even if it is just the "throaty sound," if that pleases the vehicle owner then it is worth every penny.
 

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THis is how the internet can be a bad thing. Every K&N product comes with a dyno chart to show what improvement it makes over stock. K&N will not sell a product that shows zero improvement. What the purchaser has to decide is if the improvement is enough to warrant the cost of the item. In the case of their CAI for the Hemi, the improvement is small, but quantifiable. When you combine it with other things like a free-flowing exhaust or engine mods then it becomes more noticeable. If your plans include those other mods you aren't likely to handcuff them with the stock intake system, so a K&N would be a good complement to them. On its own, I agree, the expense of a K&N CAI is probably money better spent elsewhere, but to say it has no benefit is just plain wrong. Even if it is just the "throaty sound," if that pleases the vehicle owner then it is worth every penny.
Well said. There is also the added benefit of only having to purchase one filter for the life of the truck. When dirty, stock filters are tossed and a new one must be purchased. With the K&N you just clean it when it needs it and you're back in business.
 

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I run a K&N in everything I own......for years, no problems related to them.

I was considered a "CAI", but reading about them, not sure it makes sense.

If the goal is to suck in more COLD air, the ones that open up to the side of the inside of the engine bay would seem to be doing the opposite....plus, I cant believe the seal at the tops of them work perfectly.....?

Seems like a bunch of $$$ to spend to suck in engine bay air.... :4-dontknow:
 
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This has been a good forum. I've belonged to six different ones over the years. So far, this has been a civil and friendly place to disagree...so I must disagree with the contention that a CAI produces a discernable improvement in either horsepower or gas consumption. I have participated in dyno runs with a before and after readouts and found no noticeable increase in HP. I would agree with the gentleman who said that my comment that there's no advantage is incorrect. If you consider the throaty sound you get as an improvement, then yes, it's an "advantage". If you consider the fact you don't have to buy another filter, then yes, that's an advantage...but it really ends there.

Now.. as stated by Miami Son....if you combine the CAI with additonal mods like a throttle body spacer and some modifications of the mapping with a good and reputable tuner (Diablo and SuperChips)....absolutely do you get some noticeable and measureable results. Unfortunately, there's no tuner that's been developed that can get around the encryption algorithms Dodge has implanted in their ECU software. They'll eventually come up with a work around, we just have to wait.

What you don't see with the K and N dyno results is whether they fine tuned the car prior to the run wiht the K and N...or ran it on a day that had better environmental conditions....but to simply drop in a K and N and expect instantaneous improvements is wishful thinking...other than the sound feedback which some folks feel is HP improvement. So, in the spirit of friendly comaradarie, we continue to disagree. BTW...I have run K and N in previously owned trucks; my 99 Dodge 2500 (no other mods) and in my 2001 3500 dually, but along with a chip, Banks exhaust system, 4 inch piping, and turbo rebuild. Both of these were Cummins diesels. This is my first gas truck. So I'm not an anti K and N consumer by any means...just like to qualify some of the propaganda.

To respond to the original question regarding air intake....Most of the K and N kits I've used give you a length of customized tubing that routes itself around your engine compartment and hooks into your throttle body. It is enclosed in a box open on the top that holds the K and N and serves to block off some of the residual heat generated under the hood. The one I used in my 3500 was a conical filter and set up like that. The Airaid system is open at the top (actualy in a four cornered box) and uses a conical filter similar to the K and N, but also connects to the air intake on the side that the stock box used. The Airaid system is also California CARB compliant for smog regs. I can't remember if K and N has a CARB sticker for California applications. Most likely they do....because they have to have a port to connect the electronic sensors to. Since I haven't installed a new K and N I don't know if they also connect to the original air intake on the side of the engine compartment. Those of you who have them can better respond to that part of the OP's question.
 

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C Jones, on the K&N filter benefit, here's my personal experience. This is on motorcycles, so take it for what it's worth, but it is an equal-to-equal comparison. I've had tons of motorcycles since 1970. I've modded most of them in various ways. On most of them I've swapped the stock filter with a K&N replacement...equal size for size. In at least half of those applications, I had to raised the main jet number by one...in other words one step richer on the main. Now, the main jet is usually in effect from about 3/4 throttle to WOT. No, most of us seldom drive our pickups in this range. But...this does indicate that the K&N filter medium flows more air, and my findings don't necessarily confirm that no air flow benefit was occuring at other rpm's and throttle openings...just that it didn't require rejetting or changing the carb's needle position. While this isn't a dyno chart, in my book this has always indicated to me that it was proof positive that the K&N medium and its similar counter parts flow more air than a paper or foam filter.

Now, there are airbox inlet size and flow issues and other things to consider in this mix, but I think there is something to be said for potential airflow increases with these kinds of filter mediums. This has been a good discussion on this issue.
 
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