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A buddy of mine who works in a truck shop (lifts, suspension, all that good stuff) told me something about being able to level my truck without anything but a turn of a wrench. I'm just wondering if anyone knows anything about this. He said I should jack the front end up and there will be a certain screw on either side that if I tighten I should be able to get about 2 inches higher just by that turn of the wrench. I'm new to the whole suspension ordeal and am a little confused. I can get more info on this but has anybody heard of this or does anybody know what screw he's talking about?
 

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Your buddy is referring to raising the torsion bars, assuming you have a 2WD. This is done by adjusting the bolts he made reference to. I don't know ecactly how much lift you will get, but 2" would be about the max. What he didn't tell you is that your ride will be stiffer in the front and that you'll have to have it realigned afterward because of the camber and toe changes. I recommend taking it for an alignment and having it all done at once. Just tell them what you have in mind.
 

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While it may seem like the cheap way out, I wouldn't want a stiffer ride. If i'd want a stiff ride, I would have keep my toyota tacoma.
 

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2" leveling kits on eBay for less than $100 should do the trick. All you do is drop your front end and put the leveling kits on top of the coils and bolt it back up.

Be sure to take the sound advice of having it aligned afterward...
 

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He has torsion bars not coils.
The bolt your friend is refering to is the torsion key bolt. You just put a floor jack under the center of the front end and jack up so the suspension drops all the way down. Then tighten the bolts a few turns on both sides. You can find the bolt by looking under the truck and look for the long bar that runs parallel with your frame and goes from the front lower a-arm towards the rear of the truck. It should end about the end of the transmission. There will be a bolt pointing straight towards the ground that is the bolt you want to turn. Sometimes you will need an alignment but not always. Your suspension will be a little stiffer but as long as you don't tighten the bolt in as far as it will go it will ride just fine.
 

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:smileup: Yes i agree with remerson. What i would do is leave the front end as it is. Buy a 2 inch shackle kit lowering the back. Ive seen them for sale around $70 U.S. That would come close to levling your truck out with not spending alot of money.:smileup:
 

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As 57Hemi08 said! Your just cranking the torsion bars but you can only do this if you have a 4x4. Another thing you want to do is take measurements, measure from the center of the axle to the bottom lip of your fender all the way around. Continue measuring while your doing this. You will also notice that one side of your truck is going to be ½" lower then the other side, this is normal and the way it should be. Lift the whole front end off the ground and give equal turns, always remember how many turns you made. Mine took 5 turns to raise the front end up 2" and leveled it out. What you might want to do also, I gave mine 2 or 3 turns, let the truck down and drove it a little bit that way because the front end is going to settle down, jacked it back up and turned them the rest of the way. When mine was finished I had a front end alignment done and nothing was off on it. But really anytime you do anything with the front suspension you should have the alignment checked.

At that time, I bought Rancho 9000 shocks for the truck which were suppose to be for I believe lifts up to 3-4" and I didn't notice any stiffness in the ride and it handled great.
 

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The correct way to adjust the suspension height is posted below. You obviously won't be using the same numbers, but what you're after is equal numbers from side to side.
HEIGHT MEASUREMENT - 4WD (LD)

The vehicle suspension height MUST be measured and adjusted before performing wheel alignment procedure. Also when front suspension components have been replaced. This measure must be performed with the vehicle supporting it's own weight and taken on both sides of the vehicle.


1 - HEIGHT FROM THE GROUND AT THE FRONT SPINDLE CENTERLINE (STATIC LOAD RADIUS) 2 - CENTERLINE OF THE REAR LOWER CONTROL ARM BOLT FRONT TIP 3 - GROUND LINE

  1. Inspect tires and set to correct pressure.
  2. Jounce the front of the vehicle.
  3. Measure and record the height from the ground at the centerline of the rear lower control arm bolt front tip (2) (HEIGHT MESUREMENT).
  4. Measure and record the height from the ground at the front spindle centerline (Static Load Radius) (1)(HEIGHT MESUREMENT).
  5. Subtract the first measurement from the second measurement. The difference between the two measurement should be 58 mm (2.3 inches) ± 3 mm (0.12 inches).
  6. If value is greater than 61 mm (2.4 inches), tighten the torsion bar bolt until the specification is achieved.
  7. If value is less than 55 mm (2.1 inches), loosen the torsion bar bolt until the specification is achieved.
  8. Repeat the previous steps until the curb height is within specifications.
 

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I cranked the torsion bars up on mine also. No problems at all. Never had an alignment either. Oh, and the best way to measure the change of your fender height is from the bottom lip of your wheel.
 

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Your buddy is referring to raising the torsion bars, assuming you have a 2WD. This is done by adjusting the bolts he made reference to. I don't know ecactly how much lift you will get, but 2" would be about the max. What he didn't tell you is that your ride will be stiffer in the front and that you'll have to have it realigned afterward because of the camber and toe changes. I recommend taking it for an alignment and having it all done at once. Just tell them what you have in mind.
I agree. I always reccomend against adjusting torsion bars. Your ride can get very bad and there are some safety hazards involved, I am not sure of the degree but my understanding is the change in suspension geometry can make a truck get very squirrelly after a big adjustment on the torsion bars. You are basically adjusting the preload and sprig rate of your front suspension.
 

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can't tightening up your torsion bars eventually really screw up your ride especially if your off road as much as most people on this site are?
 

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I've had mine adjusted for over a year now. I go offroad occasionally and drive across highway, mountains, and just about everything else around 100 miles a day back and forth to work. I have had absolutely no problems with my suspension. Yes the ride will change slightly, but nothing drastic.
 
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