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When I bought my Crew cab Chevy I could only find a Long bed and took it. I regretted it at first but over time I was very glad to have it. I was able to put a tool box in the bed and still have a nice size bed. It is definitely harder to maneuver in parking lots though!

I wish I could have got the long bed with my Mega cab but that would be like driving a freakin Limo lol!

Two more things:

the longer wheel base rides smoother and will control sway on a trailer better but your towing capacity is less the longer the wheel base

The CC long bed required a two piece drive shaft with center carrier which caused me some issues and cost about $500 to resolve. Im not sure how RAM is
 

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Neanders

Go to your Dealerships Fleet/Internet sales office, you can do it in person, by phone, or online
They will do the vehicle search for you & they don't have to sell you something locally, you will get the lowest price, they don't get commission, & they don't push you to buy

Buy through the dealership's Fleet Department.

Almost every dealership has a division called the "Fleet Department." It usually consists of only a handful of salespeople who specialize in selling fleets of cars -- large orders of several vehicles direct to businesses. This department is authorized by the dealership to sell their cars at bottom-line non-negotiable prices. The prices they offer are about the same as you would expect from an online price quote or after lengthy negotiations.
A secret of the car business is that many dealerships' Fleet Departments also sell direct to the public.
By the rules of the game, however, they can't advertise to the public since they don't want to compete with the dealership's retail sales team. So to buy from the Fleet Department, you have to specifically ask.

To buy your vehicle direct from the dealership's Fleet Department, simply call the dealership and ask to speak with the Fleet Manager. Explain to him that you're ready to buy a car and you'd like to buy it from him. If he asks you what business you are associated with, tell him where you work. He'll probably be happy to make an appointment with you. Unlike car salesmen, the Fleet Manager has little to hide and no games to play. So ask any questions you may have. He'll tell you exactly what to expect. He may also tell you over the phone, if you ask, his exact bottom-line selling price for the car you plan on buying.

When you arrive at the dealership, the Fleet Manager will show you the vehicle, allow you to test drive it, and then bring you to the office to discuss price. With absolutely no negotiations, he'll offer you a reasonable bottom-line non-negotiable selling price for the vehicle.

(By the way, don't let the Fleet Manager's "lingo" throw you. Since the Fleet Department sets its selling prices based on a small profit over the invoice price, he may tell you a selling price that's in relation to the invoice price. For example, he may say, "That car is three over." That means that his current selling price for that particular car is three hundred dollars over the invoice price.)

If the price he gives you falls within the pre-set limits of your buying goal and you're satisfied with the deal, then you can buy the car. No pressure, no games, no hassles.

If for some reason, you don't want to buy the vehicle, you are under no obligation. Simply thank him for his time and leave on good terms. Then, if you'd like, you can visit (or call) the Fleet Departments of other dealerships to compare prices. The selling prices offered by the various Fleet Departments can vary depending upon their inventories.

http://www.beatthecarsalesman.com/school/step5-9.html
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Neanders

Go to your Dealerships Fleet/Internet sales office, you can do it in person, by phone, or online
They will do the vehicle search for you & they don't have to sell you something locally, you will get the lowest price, they don't get commission, & they don't push you to buy

Buy through the dealership's Fleet Department.

Almost every dealership has a division called the "Fleet Department." It usually consists of only a handful of salespeople who specialize in selling fleets of cars -- large orders of several vehicles direct to businesses. This department is authorized by the dealership to sell their cars at bottom-line non-negotiable prices. The prices they offer are about the same as you would expect from an online price quote or after lengthy negotiations.
A secret of the car business is that many dealerships' Fleet Departments also sell direct to the public.
By the rules of the game, however, they can't advertise to the public since they don't want to compete with the dealership's retail sales team. So to buy from the Fleet Department, you have to specifically ask.

To buy your vehicle direct from the dealership's Fleet Department, simply call the dealership and ask to speak with the Fleet Manager. Explain to him that you're ready to buy a car and you'd like to buy it from him. If he asks you what business you are associated with, tell him where you work. He'll probably be happy to make an appointment with you. Unlike car salesmen, the Fleet Manager has little to hide and no games to play. So ask any questions you may have. He'll tell you exactly what to expect. He may also tell you over the phone, if you ask, his exact bottom-line selling price for the car you plan on buying.

When you arrive at the dealership, the Fleet Manager will show you the vehicle, allow you to test drive it, and then bring you to the office to discuss price. With absolutely no negotiations, he'll offer you a reasonable bottom-line non-negotiable selling price for the vehicle.

(By the way, don't let the Fleet Manager's "lingo" throw you. Since the Fleet Department sets its selling prices based on a small profit over the invoice price, he may tell you a selling price that's in relation to the invoice price. For example, he may say, "That car is three over." That means that his current selling price for that particular car is three hundred dollars over the invoice price.)

If the price he gives you falls within the pre-set limits of your buying goal and you're satisfied with the deal, then you can buy the car. No pressure, no games, no hassles.

If for some reason, you don't want to buy the vehicle, you are under no obligation. Simply thank him for his time and leave on good terms. Then, if you'd like, you can visit (or call) the Fleet Departments of other dealerships to compare prices. The selling prices offered by the various Fleet Departments can vary depending upon their inventories.

http://www.beatthecarsalesman.com/school/step5-9.html
Thanks for the thorough response. Don't worry, I'm all over it. Have dealt with many fleet departments and purchased several vehicles. The problem is I don't like to spend $40k or more on something for myself, that I will spend a lot of time in, without being able to see it and sit in it. Locally, the only options are a couple of long bed Hemi's. There are a few in the region that are short box...Washington and Idaho I think. I may actually make the drive to Idaho. It's a good excuse to get away, take a little road trip, see some nice scenery, and perhaps come back with a new truck. I suppose I could wait for a truck that I order, but because of some other work-related issues I kinda need the replacement sooner than later. Could get by for a while if absolutely needed, but would prefer to just get something done. I guess that's my personality. I'm picky as hell though, so I never seem satisfied with any vehicle for more than a few years before I start looking again. This time around I'm trying to convince myself to buy and hold for a while.
 

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Neanders

Go to your Dealerships Fleet/Internet sales office, you can do it in person, by phone, or online
They will do the vehicle search for you & they don't have to sell you something locally, you will get the lowest price, they don't get commission, & they don't push you to buy

Buy through the dealership's Fleet Department.

Almost every dealership has a division called the "Fleet Department." It usually consists of only a handful of salespeople who specialize in selling fleets of cars -- large orders of several vehicles direct to businesses. This department is authorized by the dealership to sell their cars at bottom-line non-negotiable prices. The prices they offer are about the same as you would expect from an online price quote or after lengthy negotiations.
A secret of the car business is that many dealerships' Fleet Departments also sell direct to the public.
By the rules of the game, however, they can't advertise to the public since they don't want to compete with the dealership's retail sales team. So to buy from the Fleet Department, you have to specifically ask.

To buy your vehicle direct from the dealership's Fleet Department, simply call the dealership and ask to speak with the Fleet Manager. Explain to him that you're ready to buy a car and you'd like to buy it from him. If he asks you what business you are associated with, tell him where you work. He'll probably be happy to make an appointment with you. Unlike car salesmen, the Fleet Manager has little to hide and no games to play. So ask any questions you may have. He'll tell you exactly what to expect. He may also tell you over the phone, if you ask, his exact bottom-line selling price for the car you plan on buying.

When you arrive at the dealership, the Fleet Manager will show you the vehicle, allow you to test drive it, and then bring you to the office to discuss price. With absolutely no negotiations, he'll offer you a reasonable bottom-line non-negotiable selling price for the vehicle.

(By the way, don't let the Fleet Manager's "lingo" throw you. Since the Fleet Department sets its selling prices based on a small profit over the invoice price, he may tell you a selling price that's in relation to the invoice price. For example, he may say, "That car is three over." That means that his current selling price for that particular car is three hundred dollars over the invoice price.)

If the price he gives you falls within the pre-set limits of your buying goal and you're satisfied with the deal, then you can buy the car. No pressure, no games, no hassles.

If for some reason, you don't want to buy the vehicle, you are under no obligation. Simply thank him for his time and leave on good terms. Then, if you'd like, you can visit (or call) the Fleet Departments of other dealerships to compare prices. The selling prices offered by the various Fleet Departments can vary depending upon their inventories.

http://www.beatthecarsalesman.com/school/step5-9.html

:rep:

Awesome info. Somewhere, someone is going to read this and save some money.
 

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Use Chrysler partners, AAA, Costco or a number of other ways to buy through Fleet if you dont like the grind game with sales ;)

For me, Chrysler Partners plus rebates was good enough with Zero hastle and a fast process.

But I thought we were talking about truck beds? :D
 

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Personally, I would go with the long bed. The extra length isn't that noticeable once you get used to it and you will more than likely appreciate the capacity of the larger bed. I've had a few short beds and constantly had issues with not having enough room in them.
 

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The extra length isn't that noticeable once you get used to it
Yeah, until you high center. Short beds are the way to go with an extended cab. If you're routinely filling up a 6.5 or even an 8" bed to the point where you cannot put anything more into it, you need a larger truck. It's as simple as that.
 

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If High centering is going to be an issue for you, having a crew cab with either bed will be an issue. Get a Jeep if high centering is a constant concern.

This is a short bed and it got high centered: :D
 

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Low centered is worse: :LOL:
 

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I'd get the 8ft bed. All my friends have short beds and are always whining about not being able to haul their chit. I'll tell U what I tell them when they whine; "you should have gotten a REAL truck with an 8ft bed"! Anything with less is just an SUV IMO.
 

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Yeah, until you high center. Short beds are the way to go with an extended cab. If you're routinely filling up a 6.5 or even an 8" bed to the point where you cannot put anything more into it, you need a larger truck. It's as simple as that.
I'd bet 90% of the people buying these trucks aren't going to be taking them places where they're going to get high-centered. I've got a quad cab long bed, which isn't a much shorter wheelbase than the new crew cab long beds, and I've been in pretty rough stuff without ever being close to high-centered.

So, if you're routinely hauling 4x8 sheets of plywood what would you get? A 6.5 ft. bed? An 8 ft. bed? Or going by what you just posted, that's routinely filling the bed up, so maybe he should just buy a Freightliner with a 20 ft. flatbed... I don't mean to be offensive, but I just don't understand your logic on that.
 

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You have to ask yourself "how will I use the truck".

If you use it like a car a lot of the time and end up in parking lots, you don't want a long bed.

If you use the truck to haul stuff all the time, you don't want a short bed.

The best work truck is a regular cab long bed, but they are getting to be a rare beast.

I had a long bed GMC regular cab until I bought my short bed Cummins about 5 months ago. I have once had something in the bed that was to long to shut the tail gate, and it was just across town so I left the tail gate down. I have a tool box in my short bed also, so if I need more room, I can take it out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I haul stuff weekly, and exactly how much just depends on the day. I'm the kinda guy that would rather have it and not need it than need it and not have it, and that mindset has me thinking long bed. There are times it really would come in handy. That's how I'm approaching the diesel vs Hemi thing too, although on that front, I just really don't see a need for the diesel.

If I go long bed, then I go local...the only two in the area happen to be sitting about 5 min from my shop. If I go short bed then the truck is in Idaho, nothing here in Oregon. I can drive over and pick it up for a lot cheaper than I can have it brought in. Last resort would be to order something, but I don't see that being necessary.
 

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You have to ask yourself "how will I use the truck".
Exactly. I bought a truck mostly for towing but I need the seats as well, so I went with a CC short bed. It still hauls 4 x 8 if I need it to occasionally. If I was buying a truck to fill up the back I'd get a long bed.

One thing to keep in mind; if a short bed would do but you're thinking about getting a long bed "just in case", get the short bed. U-haul rents open trailer for $19 a day and it holds more than the extra 2 feet in the long bed would anyway.
 

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I love my short bed, I have a 6x12 trailer to carry things.

.
 

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I'd get the 8ft bed. All my friends have short beds and are always whining about not being able to haul their chit. I'll tell U what I tell them when they whine; "you should have gotten a REAL truck with an 8ft bed"! Anything with less is just an SUV IMO.
Herp de derp, I can fit three YFZ-450's in my 6.5" with the tailgate closed.


If High centering is going to be an issue for you, having a crew cab with either bed will be an issue. Get a Jeep if high centering is a constant concern.

This is a short bed and it got high centered: :D
Dune's are for jumping. Everyone knows that. ;)


The long travel JK behind me in that picture agrees!
 
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