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Afternoon everyone. I have a 2015 Ram 1500 Crew Cab Big Horn 5.7L that I feel was purchased at rock bottom price back in February. The truck was Repo’d and listed for sale at 15k miles for $29k. I absolutely love this truck to pieces.

With my new higher paying job comes the “wants” of toys meaning larger boat (currently have. 1996 Four winns Horizon 190) and a 26’+ camper in mind.

Therefore I am looking for a moderately priced diesel. I have found a 2012 2500 Big Horn with 115k miles on it with the 68RFE transmission. Dealer states it needs O2 sensors and some EGR replacement part.

Here’s my problem. I can keep my 1500 and probably beat the hell of it with a planned 24’ boat next year and a potential camper. I prefer to go diese but need the experts to chime in and give me some pointers to look for.

So far it seems like the options part of the new truck would be a downgrade but things like that don’t bother me. The new truck is also another crew cab 4x4. I also know the 68RFE is not the best transmission out there but it seems the problems with it start to arise with power increase from programmers.

Any insight on what to look for would be much appreciated!
 

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I think the 68RE is a decent transmission, actually. I almost bought a 2500 Cummins, but after driving an Ecodiesel, decided to go that route. I'm planning on doing the GDE tune. I've driven a few Cummins Rams, they certainly drive nice, but, now with nearly 4,000 miles on the EcoDiesel, I'm blown away by the smoothness and averaging right around 30 mpg! If you absolutely need to tow over 10,000 lbs, then, by all means. I've driven hemis nearly 700,000 miles, but I'm hooked on the ED. If you don't need to tow over 10,000 lbs, should also check out an ED with 3:92 gears. Of course, the hemis are a great truck as well..... So, guess I was of no help, haha.
 

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The 68rfe is a decent transmission as long as you treat it right. I have a 2012 Ram 3500 with a 68rfe with 150,000 km on it. It's been deleted and tuned since 7000km, and running a 9" lift with 37's since 17,000 km. Daily driven and a weekend tow rig pulling up to 10,000 lbs and the transmission hasn't skipped a beat. But I do run custom trans tunning which helps and the key thing is to not lay into the skinny pedal in 5th or 6th as slipping the overdrive clutches is a common failure for the 68rfe. There are also companies like BD Diesel and Revmax offering valve body separator plates or aftermarket valve bodies that allow increased line pressure (through custom tuning) which helps the clutches not slip.


With regards to the EGR and O2 sensor issues on the truck you're looking at; I'd personally tune and delete it. Then you'll remove all that equipment, have a far more reliable and longer lasting engine, plus the added benefits of more power and torque.
 

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I've owned all three - Ecodiesel, Cummins and Hemi - as well as the old 318 and 360 Rams. IMO, the only question you should consider when purchasing any diesel is are you going to do your own maintenance and service on the truck? Oil, filters and especially labor are very expensive on a diesel unless you do it yourself. I grew up working on diesels so know my way around them but you're going to pay a good chunk of that higher paying job if all you do is drive it and have the dealer maintain it. Run the numbers on fuel cost, maintenance, etc., and then let your wallet be your guide. Also, I've seen Cummins which have 120,000 miles on them with plenty of life remaining ad others which have been beat to death, and are on their last leg. Have a qualified diesel mechanic thoroughly check it out before you purchase it and don't take the dealers word for it. My two cents...
 

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I've owned all three - Ecodiesel, Cummins and Hemi - as well as the old 318 and 360 Rams. IMO, the only question you should consider when purchasing any diesel is are you going to do your own maintenance and service on the truck? Oil, filters and especially labor are very expensive on a diesel unless you do it yourself. I grew up working on diesels so know my way around them but you're going to pay a good chunk of that higher paying job if all you do is drive it and have the dealer maintain it. Run the numbers on fuel cost, maintenance, etc., and then let your wallet be your guide. Also, I've seen Cummins which have 120,000 miles on them with plenty of life remaining ad others which have been beat to death, and are on their last leg. Have a qualified diesel mechanic thoroughly check it out before you purchase it and don't take the dealers word for it. My two cents...
I also had them and the 440 and the 361 high performance with 2 - 4 and duel points the 361 would out do the 440
 
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