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Discussion Starter #1
So I wrecked my truck this past winter.


I had the body shop do the radiator core support, side brace under passengerside fender and the suspension work that needed to be fixed and I wanted to tackle the rest


I went with a stock hood and stock fender.
I got a stock new grille and an aftermarket insert and did my grille the way i wanted it.
I have a tradesman so instead of just a stock bumper I bought one with the fog light holes so i could have fog lights.
For headlights i bought the smoked factory style headlights that use one bulb.


So i bought some ebay LED headlights and I cant get them to aim at all. I read that you have to have the LEDs postioned so they are on the sides, so that is good but one points up and to the left and shows a little on the road and the other shines way right and not on road at all. its like driving with no headlights.


Do i not have the right kind of headlight lamp housings or just cheap crappy LEDs.

I had HIDs before crash and heard the LEDs are better so thats why i am going with them. I am not looking to spend a couple of hundred dollars on headlights just want to be able to see while driving.
Any info would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks
 

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Your housings are not designed for LEDs, they produce light differently than incandescent bulbs and actual LED headlights require a series of lenses in the housing to work right, like the high end F150s or some Acuras do. Those are basically just LEDs on a plastic stick with a base from a headlight that will mount to your harnesses. Your housings cannot focus or aim LEDs.

A lot of people will drop these in and think they are great because they are dazzled by foreground lighting but don't realize they actually don't throw light as far as the halogen bulbs they had did. Worse, they glare off the reflector and blind people in oncoming traffic.

Try halogens, if you are still getting inadequate lighting then I would suggest untinted housings. AFAIK Ram never built tinted OEM dual housings
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Your housings are not designed for LEDs, they produce light differently than incandescent bulbs and actual LED headlights require a series of lenses in the housing to work right, like the high end F150s or some Acuras do. Those are basically just LEDs on a plastic stick with a base from a headlight that will mount to your harnesses. Your housings cannot focus or aim LEDs.

A lot of people will drop these in and think they are great because they are dazzled by foreground lighting but don't realize they actually don't throw light as far as the halogen bulbs they had did. Worse, they glare off the reflector and blind people in oncoming traffic.

Try halogens, if you are still getting inadequate lighting then I would suggest untinted housings. AFAIK Ram never built tinted OEM dual housings
Thats the information i was looking for. Back to HIDs for me
Thanks
Bernie
 

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HIDs have the same problem in those housings. If you don't put projectors in them don't put HIDs in
 

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Discussion Starter #6
HIDs have the same problem in those housings. If you don't put projectors in them don't put HIDs in
I had HIDs before the accident and they worked fine, plenty of light. You are correct on the on coming traffic getting more then their eye full of headlights but that seems to be the only issue i have seen.
Thanks for the help
Bernie
 

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I had HIDs before the accident and they worked fine, plenty of light. You are correct on the on coming traffic getting more then their eye full of headlights but that seems to be the only issue i have seen.
Thanks for the help
Bernie

Yeah but that's a safety issue and incredibly selfish if you don't put projectors in there. Not to be a douche, but that's not the right way to look at it and just like with the LEDs you are being dazzled by foreground lighting and glare despite the light not actually going as far. Here is a good explanation:

http://www.danielsternlighting.com/tech/bulbs/Hid/conversions/conversions.html

You're going to do what you're going to do but I'm not going to condone it
 

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Thanks for the response, your useless :doh: was of great help.
TH had it covered. I didn't need to say much more. I just found it was funny that you tried the LED glue sticks, came to the conclusion they weren't made for your headlights and then went back to a HID PNP kit. It's the same problem just albeit, not quite as cheesy. The problem is the filament position(s) and the shape and intensity of the lighting source.

Halogen filaments are very specifically hot in the center and cooler towards the ends of the filament.

HID has two hotspots and are hottest at the electrodes and coolest in the middle, and the ARC is well, ARC'd.

the LED on a stick is well, an LED on a stick and generally not manufactured to very high standards/quality and the light source is unidirectional and not omni directional like the halogen light source it is replacing. Not only that but the average LED is much wider than a filament.

Now, when they build a headlight they focus it with a pretty high level of precision around the light source it was designed for (halogen in this case). No matter HOW good the HID/LED is positioned it will never be good enough enough because the light source/hot spot is shaped differently. The other problem is compounded by the DOT lighting standard which allows for X amount of lumens above a cutoff line for the purposes of illuminating road signs. When you add one of these HID's in there, most of that light ends up there and on the ground. So the resulting output is brighter yes, but it doesn't help you see any farther and in most cases it actually reduces your distance vision. A little hard to wrap your head around, but think of it as lighting efficiency. You gain lumens with HID's but none of it is focused so the resulting output is inefficient as opposed to a highly focused halogen light will actually have more lumens where you want it, even though the total amount is less.

If you want to upgrade your lighting safely you could check out the bulb upgrade thread that I have in my signature.

I'm happy to help and give you all the information you want on the subject.In the end it's your decision and if you are really OK with jeopardizing other peoples safety then I'm not sure we can help you.
 

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Discussion Starter #11


Acceptable??:4-dontknow:
 

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Acceptable??:4-dontknow:
Absolutely!

My favorites are Philips Nightguide but apparently they're discontinued now :( They were a clear untinted bulb with a laser etched prism on one side intended to split a small portion of the light up so that yellower light (lower glare/rayleigh scattering) was directed toward the left and bluer light to the right/edge of the road. (greater scatter, potentially better visibility of white and blue eyeshine on roadside animals.) Deer and elk typically have white eyeshine, dogs and horses I think are bluer, cats and sheep/goats I believe are greenish so colors on that side of the spectrum are more useful on the side of the road. A lot of smaller mammals have red eyeshine but they pose less of a hazard to vehicles.. still not fun to hit them but that's one casualty not potentially you too.

No idea why NightGuide was discontinued... I guess their effectiveness is dependent on the design of the reflector but they work awesome in my wife's Mustang, in my old Grand Cherokee.. haven't yet installed them in the high beam of my Ram and they're entirely unavailable for our low beam :(

Anyway big tangent and a lot of words - sorry. Yes, silverstar ultras make great quality, high visibility low glare light!
 

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Mine are Phillips, they and Sylvania seem to be the most common. Good option though!
 
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