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Discussion Starter #1
I need some help, please. I have a 2001 Ram 2500 Gen 2 Cummins, extended cab. It has the 8-way power seats (driver & passenger)three motors, plus lumbar on both sides. I need to replace / rebuild the seat motors. So far I have had absolutely no luck with finding any or some place that I can send them to be rebuilt. I would greatly appreciate any help. Thank you in advance.
 

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Have you tried googling "2001 dodge ram 2500 power seat motor" or get the part number from a dealer and google just the part number.
 

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I manually adjusted mine after moving the seat all the way forward. I'm happy with mine as low as it would go.
 

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These will probably come in handy:
 

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Hold on before you buy any new motors, I just fixed two of the 3 of the ones in my '98 yesterday with nothing but a soldering iron. The front-back one worked, but the other two didn't. One would turn real slow a few turns, and eventually just stop. The other nothing at all. If you like tinkering with this stuff and are comfortable with electro/mechanical stuff, this isn't two bad.

Before you take the motors out, disconnect the harness from them and place an ohm meter across the terminals (a pair of clip leads will help, they are hard to get to) and read the resistance. My dead motors read about 40 ohms. After I "fixed" fixed them, they read about 1.5 ohms. If you read a low value, this fix may not be for you.

First you might think that you can't even get them out. The torx head screws holding them to the frame look to be blocked by the jack screw (threaded rod). I found that using a bit on a flexible bendy extension I was able to get them out.

On the one closest to the door, take the rear most bolt out first (the short one, the other is actually a pivot pin) then swivel the bracket down a bit and you will be able to get the socket on the other one. Once you get both bolts out, swivel the whole thing down and out toward the front so it is pointing almost the the brake pedal, and then you can slip it out of the end of the jack screw. (this will make sense when you are doing it).

Take the motor off the gear box (two more small torx head screws), then take the long screws out of the motor (1/4" heads), and take the end caps and housing off.

The problem is a component in the end cap where the brushes are. Its not the capacitor (green in my motors) but something I spent a long time looking for. I'm an engineer and I couldn't figure out for the longest time what was up, until I ohmed out the motor at 40 ohms, but got 1.5 ohms reading right at the brushes in the cap when they were both squarely on a single commutator.

Where you see the brass contact come inside the cap, it appears to take a brass bus bar over to the brush, but that bus bar is actually a wafer type device of some type. Look close, it is not a sold bar, but two plates of brass with something thin between them. I still have no idea what they are/do.

And on my motors it was presenting most of that 40 ohms. My fix? I scraped the top edge of both plates with a screwdriver and deposited some solder across the edge of the two plates, effectively shorting them out. I applied power to test and the motor sang!

All I can figure is it is some kind of current limiting device, or circuit breaker, or something the designer put in there and would deteriorate over time, thereby improving the replacement motor market.

Putting the armature back into the end cap with the brushes can be a bit tricky. Slip into the bushing against the brushes, then keeping a bit of pressure on it, use a jewlers screwdriver, or dental pick and pull one brush back until it clears the commutator. Lean the armature to that side with a little bit of pressure, and the brush should stay in place. Then pull back the other brush and the armature should slip down in the cap all the way.

The other tip is when you are slipping the motor casing back over the armature, keep a finger on the far end of the armature and one on the brush end cap. If you don't, as you slip the casing down on the armature, the magnets can grab the armature and pull it out of the cap and brushes and you get to start all over again.

Lastly, I think the back end of the motors have an open, hex/allen bore in them that you could use to turn the motor and mech while it was all still installed if you have to.

Hope that helps, I for one am glad I didn't drop $150 for new motors on my truck!
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Wow - I have pulled the motor and taken it apart, but kinda like you, not sure exactly what to do next. I'm going to give it a try and hope I'm smart enough to figure it out. I like "tinkering" with this sort of thing, so it might be a good new challenge. Thank you for your reply. I will post my results. Have a great day.
 

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Wow - I have pulled the motor and taken it apart, but kinda like you, not sure exactly what to do next. I'm going to give it a try and hope I'm smart enough to figure it out. I like "tinkering" with this sort of thing, so it might be a good new challenge. Thank you for your reply. I will post my results. Have a great day.
The previous reply was a copy and paste from another post not my experience. Hope it helps.
 

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Wow - I have pulled the motor and taken it apart, but kinda like you, not sure exactly what to do next. I'm going to give it a try and hope I'm smart enough to figure it out. I like "tinkering" with this sort of thing, so it might be a good new challenge. Thank you for your reply. I will post my results. Have a great day.
Hold on before you buy any new motors, I just fixed two of the 3 of the ones in my '98 yesterday with nothing but a soldering iron. The front-back one worked, but the other two didn't. One would turn real slow a few turns, and eventually just stop. The other nothing at all. If you like tinkering with this stuff and are comfortable with electro/mechanical stuff, this isn't two bad.

Before you take the motors out, disconnect the harness from them and place an ohm meter across the terminals (a pair of clip leads will help, they are hard to get to) and read the resistance. My dead motors read about 40 ohms. After I "fixed" fixed them, they read about 1.5 ohms. If you read a low value, this fix may not be for you.

First you might think that you can't even get them out. The torx head screws holding them to the frame look to be blocked by the jack screw (threaded rod). I found that using a bit on a flexible bendy extension I was able to get them out.

On the one closest to the door, take the rear most bolt out first (the short one, the other is actually a pivot pin) then swivel the bracket down a bit and you will be able to get the socket on the other one. Once you get both bolts out, swivel the whole thing down and out toward the front so it is pointing almost the the brake pedal, and then you can slip it out of the end of the jack screw. (this will make sense when you are doing it).

Take the motor off the gear box (two more small torx head screws), then take the long screws out of the motor (1/4" heads), and take the end caps and housing off.

The problem is a component in the end cap where the brushes are. Its not the capacitor (green in my motors) but something I spent a long time looking for. I'm an engineer and I couldn't figure out for the longest time what was up, until I ohmed out the motor at 40 ohms, but got 1.5 ohms reading right at the brushes in the cap when they were both squarely on a single commutator.

Where you see the brass contact come inside the cap, it appears to take a brass bus bar over to the brush, but that bus bar is actually a wafer type device of some type. Look close, it is not a sold bar, but two plates of brass with something thin between them. I still have no idea what they are/do.

And on my motors it was presenting most of that 40 ohms. My fix? I scraped the top edge of both plates with a screwdriver and deposited some solder across the edge of the two plates, effectively shorting them out. I applied power to test and the motor sang!

All I can figure is it is some kind of current limiting device, or circuit breaker, or something the designer put in there and would deteriorate over time, thereby improving the replacement motor market.

Putting the armature back into the end cap with the brushes can be a bit tricky. Slip into the bushing against the brushes, then keeping a bit of pressure on it, use a jewlers screwdriver, or dental pick and pull one brush back until it clears the commutator. Lean the armature to that side with a little bit of pressure, and the brush should stay in place. Then pull back the other brush and the armature should slip down in the cap all the way.

The other tip is when you are slipping the motor casing back over the armature, keep a finger on the far end of the armature and one on the brush end cap. If you don't, as you slip the casing down on the armature, the magnets can grab the armature and pull it out of the cap and brushes and you get to start all over again.

Lastly, I think the back end of the motors have an open, hex/allen bore in them that you could use to turn the motor and mech while it was all still installed if you have to.

Hope that helps, I for one am glad I didn't drop $150 for new motors on my truck!
The previous reply was a copy and paste from another post not my experience. Hope it helps.

I give you the credit for posting, even if you didn't originally offer the fix. FYI - I now have six working power seat motors. A couple of hours saved me almost $500.00. A YouTube video needs to be posted on this fix. During my search, I have found motors are almost impossible to find and when I did find one, it the seller wanted $80 or more. I hope, at some point, I can offer you a remedy. Thank you for the reply and have a great day.
 

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I give you the credit for posting, even if you didn't originally offer the fix. FYI - I now have six working power seat motors. A couple of hours saved me almost $500.00. A YouTube video needs to be posted on this fix. During my search, I have found motors are almost impossible to find and when I did find one, it the seller wanted $80 or more. I hope, at some point, I can offer you a remedy. Thank you for the reply and have a great day.
So the post with the repair helped you? If so I was glad to be of assistance.
 
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