DODGE RAM FORUM banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have a 2015 Ram 2500 Crew Cab heavy duty with the tow package, with a 6.7 Cummings Diesel engine and automatic transmission. The truck has the factory installed rear leveling air bags. The tow rating for this truck is listed as 17,200 lbs with a payload capacity weight of 2,350 (or close to those numbers anyway)
Question - Do any of you out there have any experience towing a 5th wheel trailer? If so, what model, and how large/heavy of a model do you tow? Do you have any concerns or success stories that can help me decide on the max size 5th wheel to purchase for our Ram 2500?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,496 Posts
Hi, Randy, and thanks for joining the RamforumZ. I encourage you to stop by the Newbie Checkin section and introduce yourself so other members and give you a proper how-do-ya-do.

Good luck finding your answer. I have read some stories about other members' towing experiences with a 5th wheel. Have you used the search function yet. It may be a needle in a haystack. Luckily, we have a pretty good haystack.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
237 Posts
I have a truck very similar to yours, just with out the air bags. My Tow Rating is les though, 17,050 (or I was told). 5th weels carry almost 20% of the weight on the pin. That means that the 20% of the weight of the entire trailer will be on the pin in the back of your truck. 2500s can't handle the same pin weight (Palyload weight) as a 3500. actually now wheres near. I would try to stay around 12K lbs for the trailer and you should be ok. That gibes a pin weight of just over 2,000 lbs. Don't forget to take in account of your passengers and gear.

We ordered our truck with the same 5th wheel / Gooseneck package. I really want to get a Goosneck flat deck trailer later for hauling Jeeps, and my backhoe. I picked up a old dual axle car trailer and have been using that. Truck tows like a champ and the engine brake helps out a lot.

Good luck! Hope you find a nice 5th wheel trailer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
248 Posts
jeep pretty much covered it. I'll add that You limited yourself to very few choices with the 2500. U didn't say how big of one you would like to have or if you wanted a toy hauler or plain fifth wheel. You will find your actual trucks payload capacity on the sticker inside your drivers door. Should be around the numbers you listed. Your trim will affect that number too. If for example u have a Laramie it will b less. That's why I bought a 3500. You will have no problem with the Cummins though unless of course you were 1ooking at triple axles. Then your gearing etc. would come into the equation. But u don't have to worry about that. Don't forget to add up your weights and your 5er hitch (suckers are heavy). You could go with an Andersen ultimate aluminum like I have. They are awesome and weigh almost nothing. Mine is a 36' heartland torque . Don't forget to check my other thread about the factory brake controller. They are not working correctly on the 15's if u have it. Good luck

I have a 2015 Ram 2500 Crew Cab heavy duty with the tow package, with a 6.7 Cummings Diesel engine and automatic transmission. The truck has the factory installed rear leveling air bags. The tow rating for this truck is listed as 17,200 lbs with a payload capacity weight of 2,350 (or close to those numbers anyway)
Question - Do any of you out there have any experience towing a 5th wheel trailer? If so, what model, and how large/heavy of a model do you tow? Do you have any concerns or success stories that can help me decide on the max size 5th wheel to purchase for our Ram 2500?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
237 Posts
CC is right. We didn't even think of it when purchasing our truck. I was planning on hauling Jeeps for the most part. We got a Gooseneck package and are planning on getting a flat deck Gooseneck later. I have a 66 Case backhoe that because of the width and outriggers needs a heavy duty flat deck trailer. Our truck has a max tow capacity of 17,050 lbs. My Backhoe weighs in at almost 10,000 lbs. My backhoe on the gooseneck trailer would be just over 15,000 lbs, depending on the trailer. I'd be within 2,000 lbs (1 ton) of my max towing capacity). That is pretty close but on our truck with a gooseneck trailer I believe it will be fine. Close but not worried.

5th wheels carry alot of weight on the pin, where Goosenecks you can position your load forward or back on the trailer to dispurse the weight where you want it. I honestly didn't realize that before purchasing our truck. Learned it from reading on here. luckily we are looking at Gooseneck not fith wheel. If I was trying to pull a fith wheel I would be scrwed. We also wanted the rear coils, not auto leveling air bags. I believe they help some, but not sure. I didn't want them becuase of suspension mods later.

Good luck, keep us updated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
248 Posts
The laws vary by state whether you only need a cdl for certain brakes or an r endoresement, or whatever. Correct me if im wrong, but doesnt the law go by actual weight of what youre towing, not what the ability of the truck and trailer are? I have a 3500 with a 38' toy hauler. So, my trucks gvw is 10500 and the gvw of the t.h is just over 15k so i am still under the 26k even with a 3500 even if i was fully loaded which i never am. I bought the 1 ton because it gives me a 3800 pound payload which is perfect for the trailer i tow. Most being tongue heavy. The pin weight on mine is up there approaching 3k . I dont have to worry about squat.

Now, you have youre guys that have a dually diesel that think they can tow anything and its all a penis size competition. They buy it for a triple axle, think they are fine, and dont know they are over weight cause they have the wrong gearing. Some will not get a dually and should have one cause the pin weight is up into the 3000's .Just as an example, there are a lot of big fivers (toy haulers) that have a gvw closer to 20k or more and they are loaded up with toys and supplies. now you have a 20k trailer and a truck full of people, supplies, etc. Now, in this case , if you were to cause an accident or kill someone, youre screwed. Chances are they dont even look at you on the road though. i deal with large rvs.. This is why i dont understand getting the 3/4 over the 1 ton. Cause some of those 3/4 trucks will really squat! I know some guys like the coils on the ram or dont want to pay a few more bucks for registration. But, i made the mistake of buying not enough truck before. From now on, I will get as much as I can afford. It all depends on what you are towing i guess.
I saw one guy who had an older ram 2500 (early 2000's). He had atriple axle toy hauler and I had to stop and take a look. He said he had beefed up the suspension (I think he modded the leaf system). But, his towing cap. was ridiculous for that trailer. He told me he couldnt make it up a big grade and he had to stop once LOL




Here's a link to someone that tows for living with a 2500HD Megacab.

http://s474.photobucket.com/user/Ltngdrvr/media/Why I run a the truck that I run.jpg.html

Ltngdrvr posts more on the Cummins Forum.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,247 Posts
The laws vary by state whether you only need a cdl for certain brakes or an r endoresement, or whatever. Correct me if im wrong, but doesnt the law go by actual weight of what youre towing, not what the ability of the truck and trailer are? I have a 3500 with a 38' toy hauler. So, my trucks gvw is 10500 and the gvw of the t.h is just over 15k so i am still under the 26k even with a 3500 even if i was fully loaded which i never am. I bought the 1 ton because it gives me a 3800 pound payload which is perfect for the trailer i tow. Most being tongue heavy. The pin weight on mine is up there approaching 3k . I dont have to worry about squat.

Now, you have youre guys that have a dually diesel that think they can tow anything and its all a penis size competition. They buy it for a triple axle, think they are fine, and dont know they are over weight cause they have the wrong gearing. Some will not get a dually and should have one cause the pin weight is up into the 3000's .Just as an example, there are a lot of big fivers (toy haulers) that have a gvw closer to 20k or more and they are loaded up with toys and supplies. now you have a 20k trailer and a truck full of people, supplies, etc. Now, in this case , if you were to cause an accident or kill someone, youre screwed. Chances are they dont even look at you on the road though. i deal with large rvs.. This is why i dont understand getting the 3/4 over the 1 ton. Cause some of those 3/4 trucks will really squat! I know some guys like the coils on the ram or dont want to pay a few more bucks for registration. But, i made the mistake of buying not enough truck before. From now on, I will get as much as I can afford. It all depends on what you are towing i guess.
I saw one guy who had an older ram 2500 (early 2000's). He had atriple axle toy hauler and I had to stop and take a look. He said he had beefed up the suspension (I think he modded the leaf system). But, his towing cap. was ridiculous for that trailer. He told me he couldnt make it up a big grade and he had to stop once LOL
I understand what your saying. My own personal opinion is the 2014+ 2500HD with Cummins has the payload underated. They just don't squat much until you put 3k plus in the bed. There was a thread not too long ago where someone had put 3900 lbs in his 2500HD bed and was surprised it rocked from side to side. That's a lot of weight.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
A lot of guys, myself included, pay more attention to the Tire and Axle weight ratings than the trucks GVWR/GCWR. Axle and tire weights are what they DOT will look for if you're stopped, and the GVWR is basically just a certified rating by the manufacturer. Particularly on the 2500's, they are extremely payload underrated to keep them under a rating of 10000 pounds for registrations sake. Of course, this is your choice and I'm sure some people will disagree, and I'm not looking to start a war here. That's just my opinion and what I've become comfortable with through a lot of my own research. Ultimately of course, it's your decision to make.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
jeep pretty much covered it. I'll add that You limited yourself to very few choices with the 2500. U didn't say how big of one you would like to have or if you wanted a toy hauler or plain fifth wheel. You will find your actual trucks payload capacity on the sticker inside your drivers door. Should be around the numbers you listed. Your trim will affect that number too. If for example u have a Laramie it will b less. That's why I bought a 3500. You will have no problem with the Cummins though unless of course you were 1ooking at triple axles. Then your gearing etc. would come into the equation. But u don't have to worry about that. Don't forget to add up your weights and your 5er hitch (suckers are heavy). You could go with an Andersen ultimate aluminum like I have. They are awesome and weigh almost nothing. Mine is a 36' heartland torque . Don't forget to check my other thread about the factory brake controller. They are not working correctly on the 15's if u have it. Good luck
I was caught off guard because I purchased the new Ram based upon the towing ability of 17,200 lbs. I didn't realize the pin weight would be so limiting. Fortunately, we are not interested in a large toy hauler triple axle. I am looking at a 35 foot Montana 5er, pin weight dry is 2400, suppose if I loose some weight and don't bring my wife, I can stay near the payload,,,hahaha.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
I understand what your saying. My own personal opinion is the 2014+ 2500HD with Cummins has the payload underated. They just don't squat much until you put 3k plus in the bed. There was a thread not too long ago where someone had put 3900 lbs in his 2500HD bed and was surprised it rocked from side to side. That's a lot of weight.
A lot of guys, myself included, pay more attention to the Tire and Axle weight ratings than the trucks GVWR/GCWR. Axle and tire weights are what they DOT will look for if you're stopped, and the GVWR is basically just a certified rating by the manufacturer. Particularly on the 2500's, they are extremely payload underrated to keep them under a rating of 10000 pounds for registrations sake. Of course, this is your choice and I'm sure some people will disagree, and I'm not looking to start a war here. That's just my opinion and what I've become comfortable with through a lot of my own research. Ultimately of course, it's your decision to make.
the information you talk about, the tires and axel weight ratings align with the information I got from an experienced Diesel mechanic and RV towing friend Thanks a ton,
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Everyone, Thanks for all the great input. I'm looking over the links you sent and sorting through to determine the input closest to my desire to pull the 5er trailer. I am hoping to be successful buying a rig that has a dry weight of about 12,000 lbs and being mindful of additional payload (although, I am aware this includes the 5er hitch, people, and gear.) Continuing the search, thanks. If I buy, Ill let you all know.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Everyone, Thanks for all the great input. I'm looking over the links you sent and sorting through to determine the input closest to my desire to pull the 5er trailer. I am hoping to be successful buying a rig that has a dry weight of about 12,000 lbs and being mindful of additional payload (although, I am aware this includes the 5er hitch, people, and gear.) Continuing the search, thanks. If I buy, Ill let you all know.
However, Please keep the posts coming. I am really interested in getting advice from a 2500 owner towing a 5er that is over their payload by say 600 to 800 lbs..
I know my diesel will handle it, and the factory air bags will help, but 'does it swat or have other issues?

Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,247 Posts
What 5th Wheel RV are you towing? If you don't have one already, lightweight 5th wheel RV's are more available. Just use google. 1500 lb hitch weight is easy to find.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
A lot of guys, myself included, pay more attention to the Tire and Axle weight ratings than the trucks GVWR/GCWR. Axle and tire weights are what they DOT will look for if you're stopped, and the GVWR is basically just a certified rating by the manufacturer. Particularly on the 2500's, they are extremely payload underrated to keep them under a rating of 10000 pounds for registrations sake. Of course, this is your choice and I'm sure some people will disagree, and I'm not looking to start a war here. That's just my opinion and what I've become comfortable with through a lot of my own research. Ultimately of course, it's your decision to make.
Thanks Tri, this is what I was thinking too. The advice on the tire is sound
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
What 5th Wheel RV are you towing? If you don't have one already, lightweight 5th wheel RV's are more available. Just use google. 1500 lb hitch weight is easy to find.
Fortunately, we have not purchased the 5th wheel yet. We are looking at the 35 foot Montana. I think the pin weight will be about 3000 when it is fully loaded with water, our stuff, etc.
On the light weight trailer side, I will research that (perhaps a different forum) My initial thought is that light weight is not as durable and will risk poor longevity, but i don't know.
I.ll google as you suggested,
Thanks Ray
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Towing 5th Wheel

I bought a 30' travel trailer last year that weighed about 8500 lbs. About the same time I purchased our 2014 2500 4x4 CTD far exceeding what I needed for that trailer. Several months later an opportunity came along on a used 39' 2014 Grand Design Solitude 368RD fifth wheel. Dry weight is about 12,700. Loaded it roughly has a payload of about 3000 or less. The truck drops 2 1/4" when hooked up. I can say that with the knowledge I have now if I could start over I would have bought a 3500 SRW first because the "specs" say that is what is needed. However, this truck pulls great and drives great, it is steady down the road. I average 12 MPG on the flat interstate roads in Florida. It drops to 10+ the further north I go where the roads aren't quite as flat. Stopping is ok (can be better), but in my opinion it was also only ok on the 8500 lb. 30 foot I previously owned. With few exceptions all travel trailers and fifth wheels have drum brakes, there is no excuse for that. The problem is not the truck, it is the trailer brake system. My plan is to install disc brakes on the Solitude when the weather cools off in Fl. I drive this truck 7 days a week. I already have almost 20,000 miles on the truck. My wife and I have gone camping 20+ times in the last year. The 2500 CTD is a terrific truck towing or not towing. As a side note I highly recommend 4x4. More than once on nothing more than slick grass it has saved the day.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
32,659 Posts
The Rams will handle the weight
BUT IF you drive across the Truck Scales on the Highway, be prepared to get pulled into Inspection & pay the price. They check everything !!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
I bought a 30' travel trailer last year that weighed about 8500 lbs. About the same time I purchased our 2014 2500 4x4 CTD far exceeding what I needed for that trailer. Several months later an opportunity came along on a used 39' 2014 Grand Design Solitude 368RD fifth wheel. Dry weight is about 12,700. Loaded it roughly has a payload of about 3000 or less. The truck drops 2 1/4" when hooked up. I can say that with the knowledge I have now if I could start over I would have bought a 3500 SRW first because the "specs" say that is what is needed. However, this truck pulls great and drives great, it is steady down the road. I average 12 MPG on the flat interstate roads in Florida. It drops to 10+ the further north I go where the roads aren't quite as flat. Stopping is ok (can be better), but in my opinion it was also only ok on the 8500 lb. 30 foot I previously owned. With few exceptions all travel trailers and fifth wheels have drum brakes, there is no excuse for that. The problem is not the truck, it is the trailer brake system. My plan is to install disc brakes on the Solitude when the weather cools off in Fl. I drive this truck 7 days a week. I already have almost 20,000 miles on the truck. My wife and I have gone camping 20+ times in the last year. The 2500 CTD is a terrific truck towing or not towing. As a side note I highly recommend 4x4. More than once on nothing more than slick grass it has saved the day.
Good info, thanks. By your weights provided for your 368RD, using 20% calculation for estimated pin weight, it looks like you have about 3,140 lbs payload. That is right in the ball park of the package I am looking at purchasing. Thanks much for your experience and mileage expected too.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top