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ok so last night i was driving home and my tranny lines decided to blow.. i had to make it ten miles to my house with no tranny fluid due to it spraying out and leaving a smoke trail from it hitting my exhaust lol... 1 mile first gear quit working (SH**) 6 miles 2nd gear gone(im screwed) finally i got home and it stuck in 3rd the whole time... so today i decided to put some tranny fluid in her to see what happend after i rigged up some lines with rubber hose. well its perfectly fine!!! btw my tranny has 150k miles on it. whew thank god:smileup:
 

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That's real good news! Although you were real low on trans fluid, there was still some there or the truck would refuse to move at all. Taking it easy and getting home was likely harder on you than the trans. :)
 

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Thats it!!!! Im cutting the lines on mine next!! I"ll get it too move one way or the other, and it looks like the other for me! No TSB on this in the books yet, but Im sure one will be added soon after this! LMAO
 

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Thats it!!!! Im cutting the lines on mine next!! I"ll get it too move one way or the other, and it looks like the other for me! No TSB on this in the books yet, but Im sure one will be added soon after this! LMAO
I am looking forward to your post explaining of how the OP was able to drive his truck 10 miles with no oil in the transmission. It is my understanding that an automatic transmission is a hydraulic device that requires oil at the pump to build pressure to close clutches or bands which in turn couple the various parts of the gear train to facilitate connection from the TC to the drive shaft.

It is also my understanding that the TC is a viscous coupler that is not capable to transferring the engine power to the transmission input shaft in the absence of fluid.

It is also my understanding that in a fluid staved transmission, the pressure drop from the pump taking air causes a weak coupling force which leads to slipping, which leads to the big killer - Heat. If there is enough fluid to maintain TC coupling and enough pressure to keep at least the 'direct' couplings in place, and the operator drives at zero slippage to ensure no additional heat, would this not yield the results experienced?

Is there another set of conditions that occur that make this 10 mile drive scenario possible? :4-dontknow:
 
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