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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey everybody I just was wondering what my Dodge Ram 1500 Hemi 4x4 with Cooper tires can tow and what the capabilities are? I was driving to work this morning and saw a Ford F150 double cab stuck with a small trailer. Sometimes I see people stuck on the road and they try to push there cars out of the way so they don't cause traffic. When I see that I feel bad cause I know how it feels when that happens cause it has happen to me before not with my truck though. I do try to help those in need. Now I know that I could tow a car or small suv but would I been able to help that guy with the Ford and his trailer? If I wasnt going to work I would of tried but wasn't sure. What do yall think? Has anyone ever try this?
 

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Hey everybody I just was wondering what my Dodge Ram 1500 Hemi 4x4 with Cooper tires can tow and what the capabilities are? I was driving to work this morning and saw a Ford F150 double cab stuck with a small trailer. Sometimes I see people stuck on the road and they try to push there cars out of the way so they don't cause traffic. When I see that I feel bad cause I know how it feels when that happens cause it has happen to me before not with my truck though. I do try to help those in need. Now I know that I could tow a car or small suv but would I been able to help that guy with the Ford and his trailer? If I wasnt going to work I would of tried but wasn't sure. What do yall think? Has anyone ever try this?
Firs off I can tell you that you can tow more than 5000Lbs, I tow a 32foot travel trailer with my 5.2L ram van, I did the math and the engine produces enough toruqe for the drivetrain to be able to effectively pull 17,444 Lbs but at a very very slow speed. 17,444Lbs at 295 FT-LBs engine torque, 2.45 gear ratio and 3.55 axle ratio, but again the speed will be extremely slow.

But besides the point, you should be able to tow quite a bit of weight. I notice many people who tow actually have more tow vehicle then they need.

With towing, it's the tongue weight that you have to spend more time worrying about. If you have a trailer that weighs 4000lbs and has a tongue weight of 800 lbs it's going to put so much more on the vehicle then a trailer weighing 6000 lbs with a tongue of say 450 lbs. The reason why is because of the downward force being put on the axle, it also displaces some of the weight from the front to the rear. This is a reason why full floating axles are common with heavy duty trucks that are intended to have a high payload.
 

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I towed an 18' dual axle flatbed with my wife's Liberty on it crammed with a bunch of stuff from TX to CT. This was completely stock before most of any mods I have done and the only place I had issues was the TN mountains (they're STEEP!).
 

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Believe me, when it comes to pulling someone out of a tight spot, your Ram will do the trick
just the right choice of transmission gear & good rubber & you can do it

Now towing a trailer down the highway is another matter, then it is a combination of engine power, transmission gearing, & rear differential ratio, then of course tire rubber
 

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I towed an 18' dual axle flatbed with my wife's Liberty on it crammed with a bunch of stuff from TX to CT. This was completely stock before most of any mods I have done and the only place I had issues was the TN mountains (they're STEEP!).
I hope you guys didn't exceed the GCVWR. Any vehicle should be able to tow more then twice it's weight simply.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
This is good info guys. I didn't know the Rams had this much potential. So would my truck be able to pull Hemilonestar's truck and his trailer cause that would be a awesome test of strength and power. Nice pic by the way
 

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I doubt it, Liberty weighs about 4200lbs, we probably had 400lbs of shit in it and the flatbed was about 1800lbs if I remember right. Still less than 7000lbs. It was this trailer but with the Jeep on it:

Oh I must of misread something, I thought you used your wifes jeep to tow. Anyway's yea if you're talking about the truck and I assume you are then yea you have a way to go before you exceed the GCVWR. BTW Nice colour (the truck)...
But for the most part, If I tow it's usually a 32' travel trailer. This year in may I am going to be towing that 32' then tow a small u haul. I did some math to do determinations of engine work and so on to figure out if I can tow the uhaul in Overdrive without it constantly downshifting to 3rd. I might be able too, I don't want to but gas costs man oh man (murder).
 

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This is good info guys. I didn't know the Rams had this much potential. So would my truck be able to pull Hemilonestar's truck and his trailer cause that would be a awesome test of strength and power. Nice pic by the way
My truck + the trailer with the Jeep on it = about 12,000lbs. Possible? Yes. Recommended or safe? No.

Oh I must of misread something, I thought you used your wifes jeep to tow. Anyway's yea if you're talking about the truck and I assume you are then yea you have a way to go before you exceed the GCVWR. BTW Nice colour (the truck)...
But for the most part, If I tow it's usually a 32' travel trailer. This year in may I am going to be towing that 32' then tow a small u haul. I did some math to do determinations of engine work and so on to figure out if I can tow the uhaul in Overdrive without it constantly downshifting to 3rd. I might be able too, I don't want to but gas costs man oh man (murder).
Thanks. Biggest thing I would tow with the Liberty is a small u-haul trailer. Those 42RLE's REALLY don't like heat.
 

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This is good info guys. I didn't know the Rams had this much potential. So would my truck be able to pull Hemilonestar's truck and his trailer cause that would be a awesome test of strength and power. Nice pic by the way
The engine is only part of the equation for power and work, it's how the torque from the engine is distributed which is the purpose of the transmission. Like I said before the engine in my 95 ram van 2500 with a 5.2l magnum can actually push or pull around 17,000 Lbs give some take some for parasitic drag, but it will only be able to do this in 1st gear and it would be at maybe 20-25 MPH tops, at that the transmission will begin to get hot FAST! The issue with towing at high speed is that the engine is that their isn't enough force being applied to the pavement to keep the weight moving.
The vehicle itself won't be able to move that kind of weight, it will have a hard time. However the drivetrain+powertrain can no problem. Sadly it takes around 90 hp to overcome the aerodynamic drag, but thankfully we have low end torque, axle ratios, transmissions, and in some cases torque converters (multipliers)
For example, I'll use my van.

Engine Producing 300 ft-lbs at 3200RPM
3.55 Rear Axle Ratio
Rear wheels have rolling radius of 13"
46RH transmission

ok
in 1st
300*2.45*3.55/1.083= 2409.27978 lbf
in 2nd
300*1.45*3.55/1.083= 1425.90028 lbf
in 3rd
300*3.55/1.083= 983.379501 lbf
and finally 4th gear
300*.69*3.55/1.083= 678.531856 lbf

now this math here is just step 1 of about 25 of what I actually use to determine the max amount of weight the drivetrain alone can effectively move.

now the difference between 4th gear and 3rd gear in terms of lbf is about
305 lbf, however this small amount can make the difference of towing a heavy trailer in 4th gear or not, the problem is with towing in 4th gear is that their isn't enough force being applied to the pavement to keep the vehicle at speed, so as you're towing in 4th the speed will decrease and the transmission will downshift in order to bring the truck back up to speed, then once it's at speed shifts back inth 4th and then the truck begins to slow down and over and over again we go...

Now in order to combat this you will have to do one of about 2 practical things, use a large axle ratio so 4.1 or have an engine which is producing more torque. Now here's the catch, in order to keep the 3.55 ratio and bring up the 4th gear force from 678 to about 1000 the engine will have to produce over 400 ft-lbs torque, period!
however if you use a 4.1 ratio then you can get away with an engine that would produce between 330-380 ft-lbs.

But this all depends on gearing, if you notice the dodge cummins equipped with automatics have heavy brass governor weights, the purpose is so the transmission has taller shifts. And the reason for taller shifts is to get the weight up to speed for the next gear to take over. Once the vehicle is up to speed it doesn't take alot of power to keep it rolling but IF their is excessive weight or hills this is a different story.

Now another thing you can do to increase the force is to use smaller wheels, and how so if because we are diving the axle shaft torque by the rolling radius of the wheel (measured in feet). The smaller the radius the more force is applied to the pavement. Now the gain can have some significance but mostly in lower gears, significance as far as say 300lbs of force.
 

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My truck + the trailer with the Jeep on it = about 12,000lbs. Possible? Yes. Recommended or safe? No.


Thanks. Biggest thing I would tow with the Liberty is a small u-haul trailer. Those 42RLE's REALLY don't like heat.
It's perfectly safe provided you don't exceed the GCVWR of your truck. My GCVWR in stock form is 11,500 Lbs and max tow capacity is 7900Lbs. Of course suspension changes, engine changes, and drivetrain changes can increase this. But it still wouldn't be legal to tow above my GCVWR.

It's also safe if you tow at the proper speed, when I was towing I started out around 60 then 65 and then I went up to 70 max and when overtaking it went up to 80.
 

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This is good info guys. I didn't know the Rams had this much potential. So would my truck be able to pull Hemilonestar's truck and his trailer cause that would be a awesome test of strength and power. Nice pic by the way
I also want to clarify, yea you can tow all that weight and thensome. But it's not going to be fast, we're talking towing at a very slow speed, spent in probably 1st gear or 2nd depends on the transmission and axle ratio like with any vehicle. But it's just not practical to keep it in such a low gear manually because the transmission will build up a massive amount of heat and potentionally burn out the transmission. But these trucks I must say are amazing.
 

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got on the scales before leaving Utah, truck alone was 5k lbs, loaded up the Uhaul and the truck...weighed again at 10,600 lbs....then drove to Edwards AFB to drop the family off before going to Korea.
 

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If you mean just for a short distance at a slow speed and if its not uphill pretty much anything you are likely to need to pull.

Ive pulled 32,000 lb empty flatbeds out of a slick spots with both a 4x4 Toyota with a 4-Cylinder and a 4.3L 4x4 S10.

The heaviest thing Ive ever pulled with my 4.7L 4X4 Ram was an 80,000 lb truck with a dead battery but i only needed to get it up to 10 miles or hour or so to bump start it.
 

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If you mean just for a short distance at a slow speed and if its not uphill pretty much anything you are likely to need to pull.

Ive pull started a loaded 80,000 lb truck with a Ram 4.7L 4x4 and a a 32,000 lb empty flatbed that was stuck in slick spot with a 4.3L S10 4x4.
It should be able to pull dead weight at 12% incline
 

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I have a 2003 1500 4.7L. I need to know where i can connect a temp sender into the transmission so i can read the temp.

I also read that my truck can pull up to 7k pound travel trailer. My trailer is 8,500 LBS. If i go slow up steep hills will my engine and trans take it?
 

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I have a 2003 1500 4.7L. I need to know where i can connect a temp sender into the transmission so i can read the temp.

I also read that my truck can pull up to 7k pound travel trailer. My trailer is 8,500 LBS. If i go slow up steep hills will my engine and trans take it?
You should be able to tow it up a steep hill but that depends how the incline. Mostly how long up hill??? You certainly will have to have it in a very low gear and keep your RPM's around 3000-4000 or higher, but depends on what gear and what ratio also the axle ratio.

But lets say you have 3.55 axle ratio and you have same gears as the 727. Then you certainly should be able to pull it but it might need to be in 1st gear if it's an incline over 15%, the DOT recommends that any grades be 12%, some are much larger but for the majority they're going to be 12 or less.

Honestly, I don't recommend you exceed the tow rating, not that the vehicle is unable to do it but it's not safe at all. And if you exceed the GCVWR you're at high risk of loosing your license, it's against the law in all states to exceed the GCVWR. But the police and DOT doesn't go around checking personal trailers, they stick with the big rigs.
 

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Getting the load moving is the hard part, once it is moving it is fairly easy going

Just like the contest where a person pulls a semi truck from a standing start on flat pavement


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=spD5_yA-kys&feature=endscreen&NR=1
This is true, it's simple physics. But it's very difficult to keep a load moving when it's against gravity meaning up hill.

The purpose of gearing other then speed control is torque distribution. You start out in low gear so their is more torque at the wheels but once the vehicle has made it's way up to speed then it will begin to upshift and it will get to the point that you need minimal torque the keep the ball rolling, until you get to a hill of course.

Most tractor trailers only produce about 600 ft-lbs of torque but they usually have a 12 Gear transmission and a seriously serious axle ratio. But the tow trucks used to tow tractors trailers produce about 1200-2000 ft-lbs and they too 12 speed, but when the tow truck weighs in about 30,000-50,000 lbs and has to be able to pull a fully load tractor trailer (up to 100,000 Lbs) he or she is going to need that torque.
 

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This is true, it's simple physics. But it's very difficult to keep a load moving when it's against gravity meaning up hill.

The purpose of gearing other then speed control is torque distribution. You start out in low gear so their is more torque at the wheels but once the vehicle has made it's way up to speed then it will begin to upshift and it will get to the point that you need minimal torque the keep the ball rolling, until you get to a hill of course.

Most tractor trailers only produce about 600 ft-lbs of torque but they usually have a 12 Gear transmission and a seriously serious axle ratio. But the tow trucks used to tow tractors trailers produce about 1200-2000 ft-lbs and they too 12 speed, but when the tow truck weighs in about 30,000-50,000 lbs and has to be able to pull a fully load tractor trailer (up to 100,000 Lbs) he or she is going to need that torque.
The typical 14-15 liter in most tractor-trailers today make 1550-1650 ft-lb. Their are some smaller displacement light-weight engines that make a little less and some larger displacement engines that exceed 2000 ft-lb.

The majority of over-the-road trucks today use a 10 Speed. Either a "Crash Box" or automated but based on conventional trans internals instead of the hydrostatic design of an Allison or conventional light duty automatics. After that the 9 Speed, 13 Speed (9-Speed where you have a "splitter" allowing ratios between gears in high-range) and 18-Speed (9-Speed where you can "split" all gears) are most common.

Most wreckers use an 18-Speed (9-Speed with an additional splitter for each hole), 15-Speed (10-Speed with additional deep-reduction range), or 8LL (8-Speed with Two Additional Granny Gears) or Allison Automatic. You do still occasionally see some 2-Speed Rears but they are much less common today.
 
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