DODGE RAM FORUM banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello--Will be towing a 25' travel trailer (GVWR 9000) for 3-5 years, from Flordia to Alaska and maybe all the way back, stopping for periods of a few days, a month or two, perhaps an entire park season. Would like to keep my 1500 hemi and change the read-end to a 3.92 rather than doing the sure thing of bumping up to a 2500 diesel. Money not really a factor, it's just the ride and the ability to runabout town when unhooked. Plus, I like 1/2 tons. Anyone with experience on this, or a strong conviction one way or the other? Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,264 Posts
9000 pounds sounds like a high GVWR for a 25' TT. My 285 (31.5' end to end) is 6000# dry and about 7600# GVWR.
What is your en-route weight of the camper or truck and trailer combined? This will determine more that the GVWR as you may not come close to that.

Also you need to consider how much tongue weight you will have and what your truck's payload is rated for.

Without knowing more weight specifics it's hard to give good advice. I towed my previous 26' camper from New Hampshire to Colorado and back with no issues aside from fuel consumption, which still wasn't bad at 10mpg. With that being said, I have the 8 speed transmission whereas your truck will have the 6 speed transmission if it's still the 2009-2010 listed in your info. The 8 speed has better gear spacing and a much lower 1st gear.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
towing q

Thanks 14Hemi and yes, you are correct--I rounded up a little sloppily for padding. Don't want to over-strain and/or wear out the truck along the way.
GWR of trailer is 7575, hitch weight is 600 lbs.
Truck plus trailer GVWR by the book = 14,375, payload is rated at 1480. Hitch weight is 600lb.
Not sure which figures I use to figure out how hard the engine and how much load is on the rear suspension, but Dodge specs say I am rated (after I drop to 17" tires and a 3.92 read end) to tow 10,000 lbs.
As you can probably tell, no experience sorting through this. Every way I look at it though, it's telling me it's time to get a new truck.
 

·
Registered
'18 RAM 3500 4WD Tradesman 6.4
Joined
·
1,248 Posts
Those with more 1500 experience will be better positioned to say if you "need a new truck" or not, but if you do I'd say it's going to be because of chassis/supension issues rather than engine capability.
Your trailer is not going to outstrip any available gas engine capability. You're not going to need the Cummins for the kind of duty you're describing.
A 2500 with the 6.4 could handle that standing on its head for sure, and then some.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
34,750 Posts
9thousandfeet is right on; if you'll be towing a lot like that you will want a 2500. It will be much more stable and the brakes, suspension, etc... will hold up better. Skip the diesel though, either the 5.7 or 6.4L Hemi will do you at those weights
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
32,783 Posts
A crazy fact:

You mentioned
Not sure which figures I use to figure out how hard the engine and how much load is on the rear suspension, but Dodge specs say I am rated (after I drop to 17" tires and a 3.92 read end) to tow 10,000 lbs.

I am currently studying to renew my Commercial Drivers License
Federal & State Rules for a regular drivers license have a cut off point
Class C drivers licenses can only Tow up to 10,000 pounds
When your Towed vehicle officially weighs 10,001 pounds, you have to have a Class B or Class A drivers license
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
775 Posts
A crazy fact:

You mentioned
Not sure which figures I use to figure out how hard the engine and how much load is on the rear suspension, but Dodge specs say I am rated (after I drop to 17" tires and a 3.92 read end) to tow 10,000 lbs.

I am currently studying to renew my Commercial Drivers License
Federal & State Rules for a regular drivers license have a cut off point
Class C drivers licenses can only Tow up to 10,000 pounds
When your Towed vehicle officially weighs 10,001 pounds, you have to have a Class B or Class A drivers license
The federal CDL rules say over 26,000 GVW requires a CDL. If 10,000 is the law where you live it must be a republic of California thing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,776 Posts
If towing that much, I wold recommend a diesel.
Cheaper fuel costs. Less wear and tear on the engine.
Regarding ride, 2500 s not bad. Had 99 Dodge 2500 for 15 yrs.
Loved that old truck.
It had a V-10 and wish I had gone diesel as much as my mpg dropped towing stuff.
not to mention when unloaded, the diesel would have got twice as much mpg./
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
34,750 Posts
A diesel for 10,000 lbs??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
318 Posts
If money was not an option I would go 3/4 ton.

If I were doing what you were doing I would throw some airbags on the rear end, maybe get a weight distribution hitch, check the brakes frequently, and go for it.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top