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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok so Traction control is turned on BUT seems like it doesn't do much . Tip the gas pedal even a little heavy and rear tires break loose. Is this normal ? Only vehicle I have ever owned where it seemed like the traction control really does nothing. I own a C6 Corvette and the traction control turned on vs off difference is HUGE. My Ram acts like ready to smoke the tires by just thinking about it
 

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2014 345ci 8hp70 44-44 3.92 Truetrac NX Express Comp Greene Racing
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Ken, the traction control is always on with the factory untuned PCM until you hit the button or switch on the new generation. If you manually pushed it will notify TCS has been partially disabled.

They make 4x4 systems for this reason, the rear of the truck unloaded is extremely light and you may have an open rear differential spinning only one tire
 

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Traction control reacts in our trucks, it does not anticipate. Once the wheel starts spinning the truck takes action to mitigate the loss of traction.

If it anticipated the loss of traction that would be more like launch control. Sports cars and trucks are used for different reasons so the programming is not going to be the same for most of the systems.

It is not hard for me to spin a tire, especially if it's wet outside. I either lock the rear or use 4WD AUTO if it is a problem until I get moving.

Just my .02
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Look I like my truck , 2nd Ram I have owned BUT the traction control is shit period. I should not have to put it in 4x4 auto or anything like that. I understand it reacts BUT I have yet to see it react period as it seems I react quicker than the truck. This is the ONLY vehicle I have ever owed that does this period. Owed Chevy trucks that react quickly , My corvette reacts quickly ( much faster than I can ) . Not bashing the truck as I really like everything about it except how crappy the so called traction control works. The point of this feature is to keep you from doing something crazy and so far I just don't see it. I was hoping the answer was " NO mine doesn't do that and something is broken " If this is how it works , its how it works and I will live with it
 

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This is my first RAM so don't know what the "norm" is but my truck's version of traction control is to get it back when you start to lose it. These trucks were built to haul, not race.

I prefer it this way as I can use my truck as I see fit and not have it cut the fuel or apply the brakes before I lose traction when I don't want it to. If I drove it like an Indy Car then I'd probably want that margin but in a truck...no thanks.

I know you can de-activate Traction Control but I don't if that's the whole thing or just part of it. I know that the Electronic Stability Control is always on unless you are in 4LO.

Just my .02
 

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Not sure if the newer ones are different, but if I pull my 2013 over so one side is on the grass and stab the accelerator the tire lights up for a second, then the power is cut down until the tire quits spinning. Works the same way on snow and ice.
 

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Not sure if the newer ones are different, but if I pull my 2013 over so one side is on the grass and stab the accelerator the tire lights up for a second, then the power is cut down until the tire quits spinning. Works the same way on snow and ice.
No different. Mine does the same thing.
 

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Traction control simply applies braking to the faster spinning wheel so more power goes to the opposite wheel. More and more vehicles ship with this as it is dirt cheap for the manufacturer when it can reuse the ABS components for the "anti-spin" rear differential which is a rip-off. Limited Slip now is also done with this same process and is not all all like in the past where there was a clutch mechanism in the rear differential.

Trucks are so very light at the rear that I have gone with limited slip in the past but now would only buy a truck with an electronic locking rear differential. For trucks already on the road the cost to install a true locker is less than $1000 and definitely worthwhile with a 2WD truck or SUV.
 

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I can't speak much to your truck on whether or not something isn't working correctly but can definitely say that is not how the traction control feels on my 2013 2500. This was my first truck with traction control with my previous truck being a 2003 ram 1500, the first week I bought the truck (bought it used in 2016) I was leaving work one day and we had about 6 inches of fresh snow on the ground so I decided to try and see what this truck could do and have a little fun. Pulling out on to the road from work taking a left I floored it about half way through the turn to make the back end kick out...I felt it start to slide for a second, got ready to counter steer and then bang, I was almost slammed up against the door cause the truck caught and straightened right out so I looked around like what the hell that was weird so I tried it again I turned the wheel slightly floored it again and got ready for the rear end to kick out and again bang I straightened right out and now I'm like what the hell is going on so I tried it one last time and as I did it I finally noticed the traction control light start blinking on the dash as it catches again and thats when I realized ohhh this truck had traction control...I looked around, found the button, turned it off and gunned it again and finally was able to get the back end to kick out sideways. I can say it definitely worked with the side to side of the rear end...I have since gotten larger tires and noticed with the new tires with a wider footprint the TC doesn't help much with the tires breaking free up a hill or something if it's wet, but it deff will not let the rear end slide out as easily as if I did not have it on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Traction control simply applies braking to the faster spinning wheel so more power goes to the opposite wheel. More and more vehicles ship with this as it is dirt cheap for the manufacturer when it can reuse the ABS components for the "anti-spin" rear differential which is a rip-off. Limited Slip now is also done with this same process and is not all all like in the past where there was a clutch mechanism in the rear differential.

Trucks are so very light at the rear that I have gone with limited slip in the past but now would only buy a truck with an electronic locking rear differential. For trucks already on the road the cost to install a true locker is less than $1000 and definitely worthwhile with a 2WD truck or SUV.
Well that is definitely NOT the way traction control works on my Corvette or my Honda Accord. It works with the throttle more than the brakes. Was an auto tech for Honda and Toyota for 20 years prior to my current job with a class 8 truck manufacture and had quite a bit of in-depth training on their systems. IF this is the way Ram is handling traction control seems like a very inefficient and cheap way to handle it.
 

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Typing on a forum is still much easier than hitting that 4x4 button apparently. Add a few hundred pounds of weight into the bed over the axle and get back to us.
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You're comparing apples to oranges, a vette is "closer" to 50/50% front to rear weight ratio and an accord is front wheel drive where most of the static and powertrain weight is.

A 4 door 4x4 truck is 70/30% with an even longer wheelbase.
 

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Well that is definitely NOT the way traction control works on my Corvette or my Honda Accord. It works with the throttle more than the brakes. Was an auto tech for Honda and Toyota for 20 years prior to my current job with a class 8 truck manufacture and had quite a bit of in-depth training on their systems. IF this is the way Ram is handling traction control seems like a very inefficient and cheap way to handle it.
:rolleyes:🤡
 

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Garc is correct, weight ratios hugely different, tire setups hugely different from a vette. as for the compact torque and power of Ram HUGELY different. These trucks have enough power that they can (due to 4 link rear suspension) break both rear tires loose with an open differential (when traction to both tires is equal)......

How many trucks at 5900lbs can run a 1/4 mile in 15 seconds at 93 MPH in pure stock trim and NO power adder....and it was my 1st time ever running on a track.
 

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This is my first RAM so don't know what the "norm" is but my truck's version of traction control is to get it back when you start to lose it. These trucks were built to haul, not race.

I prefer it this way as I can use my truck as I see fit and not have it cut the fuel or apply the brakes before I lose traction when I don't want it to. If I drove it like an Indy Car then I'd probably want that margin but in a truck...no thanks.

I know you can de-activate Traction Control but I don't if that's the whole thing or just part of it. I know that the Electronic Stability Control is always on unless you are in 4LO.

Just my .02
That ESM must be why my left rotor caught fire trying to spin my 2WD out of the snow last night after sledding. I was likely cutting the wheel hard left more often than right and had no idea about this ESM.
 
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