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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Yesterday I towed about 4 hours in a cross wind gusting near 40mph. You can see my rig in this picture:

At any rate, every time a gust hit, the trailer sway control worked really well. It was a little hard to keep speed up with traffic as the braking slowed things down, but it kept me safe and steady through the whole drive. My old truck would have almost killed me in those conditions.

Also, I came out of a toll booth next to a Ford with a similar trailer and no outside load. There was a reasonable grade after the booth and the Ford couldn't come close to keeping up.
 

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Cool! Good to know....I plan on pulling a trailer from west to east this summer and glad to have the new RAM to pull it ;o) What roof racks are you using? I need to carry a couple of kayaks and here's no where else to put 'em but on the roof....eliminates using the sunroof but its better than leaving 'em home! I've been wondering if roof racks would mar the paint. Have you had any issues at all?
 

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Sorry for the newb question, but is there some sort of sway control built in? Or is it something aftermarket like sway bars on the hitch?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Those are Thule racks with the fit kit for the 2012 Ram. They hook into the door jam. The only caveat is that they state a "reduced load limit" of 140 pounds. I am also running some Thule hood loops. I can take some pictures of the rack and tie downs. If you have other questions, pm me and I can try to help. I am a Thule dealer, so I know some about the products.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The sway control is built in. When the truck senses sway, the brakes pulse opposite the sway to bring things back in line.
 

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The sway control is built in. When the truck senses sway, the brakes pulse opposite the sway to bring things back in line.
Wow!...I hadn't heard of this. I was looking in my owner's manual, and I can't find any mention of it with the titles I searched by. Could you direct me to the section that describes this?
 

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The link just goes to the main Dodge site. I did a search for anti-sway, but I only saw mention of mechanical swaybars and such. Not saying it isn't there, but I may have missed it as there was a lot to wade through. If this truck has some kind of computer controlled anti-sway, I'd really like to know about it. I'm aware of traction control, stability control, and similiar issues, but I thought these just controlled wheel speeds to maintain traction. If there's something that kicks in for trailer sway control, I'd love to know more about it.
 

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Now that's impressive if it really works like they say, and I notice they claim it's standard on our trucks. However, it doesn't look like it stops sway in the towed vehicle...just keeps the sway from overcoming the towing vehicle. So a good sway control device is still needed in many cases. I like the simple friction sway device that I've always used on my travel trailers. My trailer weight doesn't require a load leveling system, but the simple sway bar gives a lot of stability in windy or passing situations. Thanks for the info on this TSC system.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I was very impressed with how well it worked. Obviously my enclosed trailer is small and isn't that heavy, but the trailer sway control kicked in every time a gust knocked it out of line and it made what would have been a white knuckle drive in my old ford into an almost pleasant drive.
 

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http://www.etrailer.com/Weight-Distribution/Reese/RP26002.html

I have this dual cam system on my camper. Its the best system I have ever used. Much better than a friction swap bar.
That's a very nice setup, but the friction sway bar is as simple as an anvil, and you don't have to do weekly gym workouts to wrestle with all the hardware associated with the conventional load leveling and sway components. Yes, some vehicle and trailer setups just about require the more complex setup because of tongue weight, overall length, weak truck springs, and other issues. However, if you have a decent trailer tongue weight, an airbag or other suspension aid, and a well balanced tow package, this expense and heavy hardware is not needed. I've towed a 27" travel trailer and other towed items all over the western U.S. at high speeds in all kinds of windy and otherwise detrimental conditions with just airbags and a simple friction sway bar. It was very safe, and the trailer hookup and unhook takes a few seconds with no worry about stowage of the more complex hardware.

Now look...I'm not suggesting that people push the envelope with extremely heavy towing packages by shunning load leveling and more complex sway devices when they're truly needed. My travel trailer weighs just a hair over 5000 pounds when loaded and has a well balanced tongue weight. The friction sway bar does just fine and is safe. I pulled this trailer with an '89 full size GMC Jimmy 4X4 that was lifted. This vehicle had a super short 106" wheelbase with suspension assisted airbags and a simple friction sway device. Neither semi trucks at highway speed nor high winds upset this package. You just have know what you're dealing with when it comes to overall weight, weight balance, and the capability of your tow vehicle. I used my parent's load leveling setup on their truck and trailer setup one time some years ago, and it was a PITA in comparison to mine. If you need that setup because of the factors I already mentioned, then by all means use it. Safety first. I'm just saying this is often an overrated issue for all towing situations.
 
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